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Lion Air JT610 crashes in Indonesia govt audit team on board

 
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 29, 2018 10:53 am    Post subject: Lion Air JT610 crashes in Indonesia govt audit team on board Reply with quote

Why would Lion Air Chief Executive VOLUNTEER information about a technical fault on his aircraft yesterday??
I see Lion Air founder Rusdi Kirana is a politician. Indonesian ambassador to Malaysia
And that Indonesian government Auditors were on board, who will have been looking into corruption.
The pilot should have been able to bring this airliner down safely in the sea.
Sounds to me like it was being flown remotely
Hacked?

Government officials aboard
Government officials are reportedly among the passengers aboard the downed aircraft.
http://www.thejakartapost.com/amp/news/2018/10/29/lion-air-jt610-crash -what-we-know-so-far.html

Finance Ministry spokesperson Nufransa Wira Sakti confirmed that 20 ministry officials were among the 178 adult passengers on the flight.
Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said they had been returning to their office in Pangkalpinang after either spending time with their families in Jakarta or attending the 72nd anniversary of Currency Day over the weekend.
One Environment and Forestry Ministry official and four from the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry were also on the flight, while reports have said that officials from the Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) and the Bangka Belitung Legislative Council may also have been on board.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lion Air flight JT 610 - 0620hrs 29Oct18
Jakarta to Pangkal Pinang - HACKED?


Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_IqKeiUk3lk&feature=youtu.be
- No ailerons, no elevators, no rudder?
- Why couldn't pilot ditch safely in the sea?
- Total loss of control in brand new 737 airliner?
- Indonesian govt fraud investigation team on board.
- Conflict of interest: Businessman or diplomat? Lion Air owner Rusdi Kirana is ambassador to Malaysia.
- Why did Lion Air CEO Edward Sirait volunteer damning info about 'faulty plane'?

29th October 2018
Richie Allan - Tony Gosling
richieallen.co.uk - thisweek.org.uk

Why would Lion Air Chief Executive VOLUNTEER information about a technical fault on his aircraft yesterday??
I see Lion Air founder Rusdi Kirana is a politician. Indonesian ambassador to Malaysia
And that Indonesian government Auditors were on board, who will have been looking into corruption.
The pilot should have been able to bring this airliner down safely in the sea.
Sounds to me like it was being flown remotely
Hacked?

Government officials aboard
Government officials are reportedly among the passengers aboard the downed aircraft.
http://www.thejakartapost.com/amp/news/2018/10/29/lion-air-jt610-crash -what-we-know-so-far.html

Finance Ministry spokesperson Nufransa Wira Sakti confirmed that 20 ministry officials were among the 178 adult passengers on the flight.
Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said they had been returning to their office in Pangkalpinang after either spending time with their families in Jakarta or attending the 72nd anniversary of Currency Day over the weekend.
One Environment and Forestry Ministry official and four from the Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry were also on the flight, while reports have said that officials from the Supreme Audit Agency (BPK) and the Bangka Belitung Legislative Council may also have been on board.

This is what happened after the ill-fated Lion Air flight took off. All times are in Jakarta local time.
6.20am: JT 610 takes off from Jakarta’s Soekarno-Hatta International Airport. Its arrival at Pangkal Pingang airport is scheduled for 7.20am
6.23am: Pilot Bhavye Suneja asks air traffic control for permission to turn around and return to Jakarta airport. His request is approved.
6.33am: The aircraft loses contact with air traffic control and plunges into coastal waters less than 35m deep in the Java Sea.

FRIGHTENING details have emerged of problems on the previous flight of the ill-fated Lion Air plane that crashed into the Java Sea, killing all 189 on board.
Issues which should have served as a warning, such as rapid descents that reportedly terrified passengers, occurred on the Boeing 737 MAX 8 jet before it took its final flight on Monday.
The plane, which flew from Bali to Jakarta on Sunday, suddenly dropped several times in the first few minutes of the flight.
“About three to eight minutes after it took off, I felt like the plane was losing power and unable to rise,” passenger Alon Soetanto told TVOne.
“That happened several times during the flight. We felt like in a roller coaster. Some passengers began to panic and vomit.”
Passengers from the Sunday flight, which was delayed, took to social media to report concerns about problems with the air-conditioning system and cabin lighting before the plane eventually departed, the Strait Times reported.
Indonesian TV host Conchita Caroline had concerns about the Lion Air plane on her flight from Bali to Jakarta on Sunday, a day before that same plane would crash. Picture: @conchizzlin
Indonesian TV host Conchita Caroline had concerns about the Lion Air plane on her flight from Bali to Jakarta on Sunday, a day before that same plane would crash. Picture: @conchizzlinSource:Instagram
In a detailed post online, Indonesian TV presenter Conchita Caroline, who was on Sunday’s flight, said boarding was delayed by more than an hour because a technical problem forced it to return to its parking space.
“I was angry because as a passenger who had paid her ticket, we have every right to question the aircraft’s safety,” she said in the now-removed post, according to the Times.
She said there was a “weird” engine noise upon takeoff that lasted for the whole flight.
After its initial struggle, the aircraft eventually came to a steady climb and cruise before landing safely. It was not the same story when the same plane took off for its one-hour flight the next day.
Passengers on Lion Air’s ill-fated flight JT610 experienced similar sickening drops in altitude in the 13 minutes they were in the air before the plane plummeted with rapid speed into the Java Sea.
The Boeing 737 MAX 8 struggled from the moment it began on what would be its final flight on Monday, erratically climbing and dropping until it eventually plunged 1479m in just 21 seconds.
https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/the-13-minutes-before-tr agedy-struck-how-the-lion-air-disaster-unfolded/news-story/28de53a2328 5acd177d9f5386b6731fb

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FBI: Hacker claimed to have taken over flight's engine controls
By Evan Perez, CNN
Updated 0119 GMT (0919 HKT) May 19, 2015
Man claims entertainment system helped him hack plane
https://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/17/us/fbi-hacker-flight-computer-syste ms/index.html

Man claims entertainment system helped him hack plane 02:09
Story highlights
Document: Hacker told investigators he hacked plane's controls, ordered it to climb
FBI detained Chris Roberts in April after he got off of a United Airlines flight in Syracuse
Roberts says via attorney that his only interest "has been to improve aircraft security"
(CNN)A cybersecurity consultant told the FBI he hacked into computer systems aboard airliners up to 20 times and managed to control an aircraft engine during a flight, according to federal court documents.

Chris Roberts was detained by the FBI in April following a United Airlines flight to Syracuse, New York, after officials saw Twitter posts he made discussing hacking into the plane he was traveling on.
An FBI search warrant application filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York describes the investigation of Roberts for possible computer crimes.
Read the search warrant application (PDF)
During FBI interviews in February and March, the document says, Roberts told investigators he hacked into in-flight entertainment systems aboard aircraft. He claimed to have done so 15 to 20 times from 2011 to 2014.
He also said, according to the document, that once he had hacked into the systems and then overwrote code, enabling him to issue a "CLB," or climb, command.
"He stated that he thereby caused one of the airplane engines to climb resulting in a lateral or sideways movement of the plane during one of these flights," the document says.
Roberts said he knew of vulnerabilities aboard three types of Boeing aircraft and one Airbus model. He hacked into in-flight entertainment systems made by Thales and Panasonic, he told agents, according to the document.
Canada's APTN first reported on the document.
Roberts has accused the FBI via Twitter of "incorrectly" condensing five years of his research into one paragraph.
"Lots to untangle," he tweeted.

The Kilted One...
@Sidragon1
Sorry it's so generic, but there's a whole 5 years of stuff that the affidavit incorrectly compressed into 1 paragraph....lots to untangle
4:40 AM - May 17, 2015
20
30 people are talking about this
Twitter Ads info and privacy
Attorney Andrew Crocker with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, an Internet rights advocacy group, told CNN that Roberts was not available for an interview but offered a brief statement from his client: "Over last 5 years my only interest has been to improve aircraft security. Given the current situation I've been advised against saying more."
In an interview with Wired magazine, he declined to say whether he had hacked the flight mentioned in the federal affidavit. In that article, he said a key paragraph was out of context.
"That paragraph that's in there is one paragraph out of a lot of discussions, so there is context that is obviously missing which obviously I can't say anything about," he said. "It would appear from what I've seen that the federal guys took one paragraph out of a lot of discussions and a lot of meetings and notes and just chose that one as opposed to plenty of others."
The FBI document says the bureau's agents and technical specialists "believed that Roberts had the ability and the willingness to use the equipment then with him to access or attempt to access the in-flight entertainment systems and possibly the flight control systems on any aircraft equipped with an in-flight entertainment system, and that it would endanger public safety to allow him to leave the Syracuse airport that evening with that equipment."
Roberts said he used a modified Ethernet cable to connect his laptop to an electronic box underneath his seat that controls the entertainment system. From there, he hacked into the airplane's computer nerve center, the document cites Roberts as telling the FBI.
FBI: Hacker claims he took over flight engine controls

FBI: Hacker claims he took over flight engine controls 02:16
On April 15, United Airlines told the FBI that Roberts had posted tweets about hacking into the plane he was traveling on and possibly activating the emergency passenger oxygen masks, the document says. At the time, Roberts was traveling on a United flight from Denver to Chicago, then connecting to Syracuse.
FBI agents tracked the aircraft that Roberts traveled on from Denver to Chicago and found signs of tampering and damage to electronic control boxes that connect to in-flight entertainment systems. The boxes tampered with were under the seat where Roberts sat and the one in front of his seat, the warrant application says.

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IN-FLIGHT AIRPLANES CAN NOW BE HACKED FROM THE GROUND, CYBER EXPERT WARNS
BY JASON MURDOCK ON 6/6/18 AT 12:35 PM
https://www.newsweek.com/flight-airplanes-can-now-be-hacked-ground-cyb er-expert-warns-962420

A security researcher is set to prove how security weaknesses in satellite communication (SATCOM) technology exposed “some of the largest airlines in the U.S. and Europe” to hackers and could be exploited by adversaries to reveal NATO bases in conflict zones.

Building on research first published in 2014, Ruben Santamarta, an expert at cybersecurity company IO/Active, will tell attendees at 2018’s BlackHat hacker conference in August how “entire fleets” of airplanes were left accessible from the internet, leaving hundreds of in-flight craft at risk. His talk, using the same name as a previous research report, is titled “Last Call for SATCOM Security.”

Santamarta says that he has now proven his previous theories—which suggested ships, aircraft, military personnel, emergency services, media, and industrial facilities were all vulnerable—and is now able to demonstrate exactly how a plane’s WiFi network can be tampered with from the land below.

"As far as I know I will be the first researcher that will demonstrate that it's possible to hack into communications devices on an in-flight aircraft…from the ground," he told Dark Reading this week. "We also managed to get access to important communications devices in the aircraft,” he added.

Cybersecurity
Researcher Ruben Santamarta is set to demonstrate how to tamper with planes via satellite communication (SATCOM) technology.
ISTOCK

While I/O Active, already well-known in cybersecurity circles for experiments in car hacking, has attempted to report all the potential bugs to impacted companies, the researcher has acknowledged that a number of “significant vulnerabilities” are still exploitable. None of his analysis put lives at risk, but he said the bugs in some SATCOM devices "could be used to perform cyber-physical" attacks.

"This has to be explained carefully, and we've got all the technical details backing our claim. It's not an apocalypse, but basically there are some scenarios that are possible,” he told DarkReading, adding that he will show SATCOM devices being weaponized by leveraging the security flaws.

A brief tease on the BlackHat website says his 2014 hypotheses will be taken into real-world territory. “We will go one step further and demonstrate how to turn compromised SATCOM devices into RF weapons,” it reads. “This talk will cover new areas on the topic, such as reverse engineering, Radio Frequency (RF), SATCOM, embedded security, and transportation safety and security.”

Until last year, the notion of effective plane hacking was largely believed to be purely theoretical. But as noted by Aviation Today last November, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) reconsidered this approach after its cyber experts remotely breached the defenses of a Boeing 757 commercial plane.

Robert Hickey, aviation program manager at the agency’s Science and Technology Directorate, said during a security conference in Virginia that much of his work remains classified, but revealed it didn’t take long to develop a working hacking exploit. “We got the airplane on Sept. 19, 2016,” he said. “Two days later, I was successful in accomplishing a remote, non-cooperative, penetration.” Hickey confirmed that his team broke through the network using “radio frequency communications.”

While the research was alarming, showing how future terrorists could take over planes using technology alone, Boeing stressed at the time there was “no hack of the airplane’s flight control systems.”

Back in 2015, a cybersecurity researcher called Chris Roberts hit the headlines after he told FBI investigators that he had broken into various in-flight entertainment systems more than a dozen times between 2011 and 2014, claiming to be aware of bugs in Boeing and Airbus craft. As noted by Wired, a warrant application suggested that he was able to make a plane briefly alter its course.

Roberts said that his tweet that was brought to the attention of the FBI while he was on a United Airlines flight was meant as a joke, Wired reported. He was arrested while carrying “nasty” hacking malware but, ultimately, no charges were filed and his seized equipment was returned.

Santamarta has been warning of the hacking risks for years. “We live in a world where an ever-increasing stream of digital data is flowing between continents,” his 2014 paper read. “It is clear that those who control communications traffic have an upper-hand. The ability to disrupt, inspect, modify, or re-route traffic provides an…opportunity to carry perform surveillance or conduct cyberattacks."

He added: "When it comes to security, it is no longer acceptable to rely on perceptions."

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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How To Hack An Aircraft
Kate O'Flaherty Aug 22, 2018, 05:46am
Contributor
I’m a freelance cyber security journalist covering Europe.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/kateoflahertyuk/2018/08/22/how-to-hack-an -aircraft/#20dc21be41d1


Weak systems and software complexity put aircraft systems at increasing risk of attack.SYNOPSYS
Hacking an aircraft is easier than you might think. Last year, a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) official admitted that he and his team of experts remotely hacked into a Boeing 757.

In 2016, there were more than 50 reports of GPS interference at Manila International Airport - which can lead to “missed approaches” forcing flight crews to re-approach the runway using backup navigation systems.

The results of an attack on a plane can be catastrophic. After the 2008 crash of Spanair flight 5022, it was discovered that a central computer system used to monitor technical problems in the aircraft was infected with malware. An internal report by the airline revealed the infected computer failed to find three technical problems with the aircraft which, if detected, might have stopped the plane from taking off in the first place.


The ability to breach an aircraft system has already been demonstrated. Security researcher Ruben Santamarta has shown how attacks such as bypassing the credit card check and SQL injection can be conducted on an in-flight entertainment system. Such assaults can even be perpetrated from the ground, he says.

Meanwhile, US regulator the Federal Aviation Administration(FAA) has warned that some computer systems on the Boeing 747-8 and 747-8F may be vulnerable to outside attacks due to the nature of their connectivity.

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In addition, weak encryption systems in aircraft communications addressing and reporting systems have raised issues around the privacy of messages sent via the data-link.

According to Nitha Suresh, a cybersecurity consultant at Synopsys, the surveillance signal used to broadcast the position of aircraft can potentially be eavesdropped or spoofed by highly skilled attackers.

The risk is particularly elevated in aviation due to the complexity of aircraft systems. Over the years, the size of the software supporting them has grown exponentially, says Suresh.

This complexity – including multiple lines of code – lowers the testability of the software, leaving behind vulnerabilities which can be exploited by a skilled attacker.

Adding to this, the software goes through many overhauls and updates during the lifecycle of the plane. “Unless this job is carried out with extreme caution, there is a great deal of potential for security bugs to creep into the software,” Suresh says.

In addition, modern avionics software development takes advantage of commercial off-the-shelf components. But this can potentially allow an attacker to tunnel through and enter the heart of the system, Suresh warns.

She says software vendors should take necessary precautions in terms of plugging the loopholes, “just like they would with any other open architecture”.

At the same time, Suresh points out that major development standards don’t currently include detailed cybersecurity policies. Although she concedes, the Aircraft Systems Information Security Protection (ASISP) 2015 initiative by the FAA “is a move in the right direction”.

So, what can be done to prevent malicious actors from attacking aircraft? The risks can, to an extent, be mitigated by the effective decision-making capability of an experienced pilot – who might spot something unusual, says Suresh.

But she emphasizes the importance of understanding the attack surface. “There should be a common repository of threats to both hardware and software detected by the developers and assessors. This needs to be maintained by regulatory agencies like the FAA and should also be available across different development platforms.”

Meanwhile, development teams should be able to compile all known threats to build a model. “Within this threat model, there should be information about threats that exclusively affect the product or piece of software at hand,” she adds.

Suresh also recommends taking advantage of threat intelligence and security awareness. “Anyone who is directly or indirectly involved with critical systems should be made aware of the security threats looming.”

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 1:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Boeing 737 Max 8 safety alert issued after deadly Lion Air crash
Last Updated Nov 7, 2018 10:17 PM EST
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/boeing-737-max-8-safety-alert-lion-air-cr ash-investigation-today-2018-11-07/

Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration have issued a safety alert to flight crews about potential erroneous readings from a sensor in its latest 737 Max 8 aircraft, following last month's Lion Air crash in Indonesia. Everyone on board was killed when it plunged into the sea moments after takeoff.

Boeing said it had issued an "Operations Manual Bulletin" addressing flight crew procedures in cases where there is "erroneous input from an [Angle of Attack] sensor." The "angle of attack" is the angle of the airplane or its wings compared with oncoming air or wind. The FAA said "this condition, if not addressed, could cause the flight crew to have difficulty controlling the airplane and lead to excessive nose-down attitude, significant altitude loss and possible impact with terrain."

"We are issuing this [airworthiness directive] because we evaluated all the relevant information and determined the unsafe condition described previously is likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design," the FAA wrote. "Due to the need to correct an urgent safety of flight situation, good cause exists to make this AD effective in less than 30 days."

The Lion Air flight with 189 people on board crashed into the sea off Jakarta's coast Oct. 29, marking the first crash involving the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft. The "black box" data recorder from the jet shows its airspeed indicator malfunctioned on its last four flights, investigators said Monday.


In a statement, the FAA said it plans to mandate the use of Boeing's instructions about sensors.

"The FAA continues to work closely with Boeing, and as a part of the investigative team on the Indonesia Lion Air accident, will take further appropriate actions depending on the results of the investigation," the agency said in the statement.

There are a total of 49 Boeing 737 Max planes in service across the U.S., including 26 737 Max 8 planes at Southwest Airlines, 16 at American Airlines and seven Max 9 planes at United Airlines.

Southwest issued a statement saying it has thoroughly reviewed Boeing's guidance.

"Our existing 737 Max 8 operating procedures address the scenarios described in the bulletin. To underscore our commitment to safety, Southwest is issuing communication to highlight the existing procedures to Southwest pilots that operate our 737 Max 8 fleet," the company said. "Safety is the top priority at Southwest, and we will continue to work closely with Boeing and the FAA to maintain the integrity of our fleet and validate our operating practices. Southwest's Max 8 fleet of 26 aircraft remains fully operational, and we do not expect any disruption to our schedule."

American said they had "received the bulletin from Boeing and we are reviewing. And yes, we currently have seven Max 9's in operation ... there are no plans to alter our 737 Max operations."

United said: "We are in receipt of a Flight Crew Operations Manual Bulletin, issued by Boeing, which applies to the 16 737 Max 8 aircraft currently in our fleet. This bulletin reiterates existing, well-established procedures for 737 Max 8 pilots."

Kris Van Cleave and Peter Martinez contributed to this report.

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