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Brexit and EU Referendum
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cogbias
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 3:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All of these things are hollow promises.

What you have is a media storm around immigration, but lets not be backward thinking, lets focus on some big numbers, the UK population is expected to rise by 10,000,000 people in the next ten years. That's not immigrants, that's a population boom.

So lets focus on immigration, when the real problem for America would be an emerging European tech scene, capable of taking on silicon valley.

London, Amsterdam, Berlin, Paris all have potential to be big players and while everyone is here arguing among themselves about the past, the future was not as important as the past and casting up the old war anger.

This is why we never hear the end of WW2, just to keep it fresh in our minds, because the establishment don't want anyone to forget.

The EU knocked back the trade deals and now via the US, we've managed to disenfranchise ourselves from the rest of Europe. We are a laughing stock.

Now i'm looking at Britain First directing it's attention to Scotland. They are off up the Brecon Beacons on "training exercises" and nobody bats an eyelid.

Scotland seems to be eyeing up Independence, with it's own currency and you can imagine England being forced back into the Eurozone, with one slight difference - England moving to the Euro.

It's a failure to look forward, stuck in the past. People never been to a war zone slagging off Millenials and comparing them to the guys who went to fight in WW1, etc.

It's thinking like this that fails to consider the effects on services, and how other tech firms in Europe can develop better service design, notably because service design comes from product design thinking, the centre for which would have been places like the Bauhaus.

So lets talk about services, how many tech companies hire folks from abroad? Having to tap into a talent pool of UK talent will not in any way shape or form, be competitive enough and all that talent will now surely be looking to move away.

The numbers in the UK are a problem, but they are not caused by immigrants, they are caused by say 500,000 added to the population last year. So when UKIP say the thing about Scotland being a small percentage of the overall population, it would be wise to remind them that that is the problem, not of immigration, but a population boom in England.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 5:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually the first one of those is the same point as the third one
Main reason I came across was destruction wrought on livelihoods - particularly those of black minority ethnic workers who've spent 40 years or more carving out a life for themselves in Britain. They see EU as anti black, anti commonwealth.

ian neal wrote:
No based on that poll the issues can be shortened to

sovereignty
UK control of immigration
opposition to 'ever closer union' and the European superstate

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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 30, 2016 9:04 pm    Post subject: Checkmate in 2 generations Reply with quote

The brexit referendum has brought the prevailing mindset of the millenial generation into sharp focus for many people. A generation that has been raised to believe that big brother is a reality TV show has largely voted for the 'remain' camp which was funded by the likes of goldman sachs. The brainwashing of the frankfurt school and political correctness is now coming into full fruition with the millenial generation

My concern is that the 'progressive left' ie the authoritarian, corporate-fascist, state-socialists have managed to convince the younger generation that they hold the moral high ground. They seem to have fallen for the schtick that the EU is about building a brighter more 'liberal' future when in fact it is about enslaving everyone under a technocratic police state and if you disagree with their views you are an ignorant 'racist' and should be 'no-platformed'

The true left needs to win back the moral high ground by pointing out to the young that the aim has always been to empower the workers not the corporate-fascist state, but at the moment the millenials seem to think the 'left' is corporate fascism and worst of all they seem to think that it is their friend

By the time they learn this is incorrect it will be difficult to reverse the situation. This will only require two or three more such brainwashed generations and there won't even be any call for referendums to challenge corporate power let alone anyone able to win one

Some people are trying to fight this war through 'facts' but if we don't win the moral struggle over the hearts as well as the minds of the young then they will continue to be manipulated by the emotive but missleading narratives of the controlled education system and corporate media and their state-socialist sponsors
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Brexit Is Only the Latest Proof of the Insularity and Failure of Western Establishment Institutions
Glenn Greenwald June 25 2016, 4:48 p.m. -
https://www.theintercept.com/2016/06/25/brexit-is-only-the-latest-proo f-of-the-insularity-and-failure-of-western-establishment-institutions/

THE DECISION BY U.K. voters to leave the EU is such a glaring repudiation of the wisdom and relevance of elite political and media institutions that — for once — their failures have become a prominent part of the storyline. Media reaction to the Brexit vote falls into two general categories: (1) earnest, candid attempts to understand what motivated voters to make this choice, even if that means indicting their own establishment circles, and (2) petulant, self-serving, simple-minded attacks on disobedient pro-Leave voters for being primitive, xenophobic bigots (and stupid to boot), all to evade any reckoning with their own responsibility. Virtually every reaction that falls into the former category emphasizes the profound failures of Western establishment factions; these institutions have spawned pervasive misery and inequality, only to spew condescending scorn at their victims when they object.

The Los Angeles Times’s Vincent Bevins, in an outstanding and concise analysis, wrote that “both Brexit and Trumpism are the very, very wrong answers to legitimate questions that urban elites have refused to ask for 30 years”; in particular, “since the 1980s the elites in rich countries have overplayed their hand, taking all the gains for themselves and just covering their ears when anyone else talks, and now they are watching in horror as voters revolt.” The British journalist Tom Ewing, in a comprehensive Brexit explanation, said the same dynamic driving the U.K. vote prevails in Europe and North America as well: “the arrogance of neoliberal elites in constructing a politics designed to sideline and work around democracy while leaving democracy formally intact.”

In an interview with the New Statesman, the political philosopher Michael Sandel also said that the dynamics driving the pro-Brexit sentiment were now dominant throughout the West generally: “A large constituency of working-class voters feel that not only has the economy left them behind, but so has the culture, that the sources of their dignity, the dignity of labor, have been eroded and mocked by developments with globalization, the rise of finance, the attention that is lavished by parties across the political spectrum on economic and financial elites, the technocratic emphasis of the established political parties.” After the market-venerating radicalism of Reagan and Thatcher, he said, “the center left” — Blair and Clinton and various European parties — “managed to regain political office but failed to reimagine the mission and purpose of social democracy, which became empty and obsolete.”

Three Guardian writers sounded similar themes about elite media ignorance stemming from homogeneity and detachment from the citizenry. John Harris quoted a Manchester voter as explaining, “If you’ve got money, you vote in. If you haven’t got money, you vote out.” Harris added: “Most of the media … failed to see this coming. … The alienation of the people charged with documenting the national mood from the people who actually define it is one of the ruptures that has led to this moment.” Gary Younge similarly denounced “a section of the London-based commentariat [that] anthropologized the British working class as though they were a lesser evolved breed from distant parts, all too often portraying them as bigots who did not know what was good for them.” Ian Jack’s article was headlined “In this Brexit vote, the poor turned on an elite who ignored them,” and he described how “gradually the sight of empty towns and shuttered shops became normalized or forgotten.” Headlines like this one from The Guardian in 2014 were prescient but largely ignored:


Though there were some exceptions, establishment political and media elites in the U.K. were vehemently united against Brexit, but their decreed wisdom was ignored, even scorned. That has happened time and again. As their fundamental failures become more evident to all, these elites have lost credibility, influence, and the ability to dictate outcomes.

Just last year in the U.K., Labour members chose someone to lead Tony Blair’s party — the authentically left-wing Jeremy Corbyn — who could not have been more intensely despised and patronized by almost every leading light of the British media and political class. In the U.S., the joyful rejection by Trump voters of the collective wisdom of the conservative establishment evidenced the same contempt for elite consensus. The enthusiastic and sustained rallying, especially by young voters, against beloved-by-the-establishment Hillary Clinton in favor of a 74-year-old socialist taken seriously by almost no D.C. elites reflected the same dynamic. Elite denunciations of the right-wing parties of Europe fall on deaf ears. Elites can’t stop, or even affect, any of these movements because they are, at bottom, revolts against their wisdom, authority, and virtue.

IN SUM, THE West’s establishment credibility is dying, and its influence is precipitously eroding — all deservedly so. The frenetic pace of online media makes even the most recent events feel distant, like ancient history. That, in turn, makes it easy to lose sight of how many catastrophic and devastating failures Western elites have produced in a remarkably short period of time.

In 2003, U.S. and British elites joined together to advocate one of the most heinous and immoral aggressive wars in decades: the destruction of Iraq; that it turned out to be centrally based on falsehoods that were ratified by the most trusted institutions, as well as a complete policy failure even on its own terms, gutted public trust.


In 2008, their economic worldview and unrestrained corruption precipitated a global economic crisis that literally caused, and is still causing, billions of people to suffer — in response, they quickly protected the plutocrats who caused the crisis while leaving the victimized masses to cope with the generational fallout. Even now, Western elites continue to proselytize markets and impose free trade and globalization without the slightest concern for the vast inequality and destruction of economic security those policies generate.


In 2011, NATO bombed Libya by pretending it was motivated by humanitarianism, only to ignore that country once the fun military triumph was celebrated, thus leaving a vacuum of anarchy and militia rule for years that spread instability through the region and fueled the refugee crisis. The U.S. and its European allies continue to invade, occupy, and bomb predominantly Muslim countries while propping up their most brutal tyrants, then feign befuddlement about why anyone would want to attack them back, justifying erosions of basic liberties and more bombing campaigns and ratcheting up fear levels each time someone does. The rise of ISIS and the foothold it seized in Iraq and Libya were the direct byproducts of the West’s military actions (as even Tony Blair admitted regarding Iraq). Western societies continue to divert massive resources into military weaponry and prisons for their citizens, enriching the most powerful factions in the process, all while imposing harsh austerity on already suffering masses. In sum, Western elites thrive while everyone else loses hope.

These are not random, isolated mistakes. They are the byproduct of fundamental cultural pathologies within Western elite circles — a deep rot. Why should institutions that have repeatedly authored such travesties, and spread such misery, continue to command respect and credibility? They shouldn’t, and they’re not. As Chris Hayes warned in his 2012 book Twilight of the Elites, “Given both the scope and depth of this distrust [in elite institutions], it’s clear that we’re in the midst of something far grander and more perilous than just a crisis of government or a crisis of capitalism. We are in the midst of a broad and devastating crisis of authority.”

It’s natural — and inevitable — that malignant figures will try to exploit this vacuum of authority. All sorts of demagogues and extremists will try to redirect mass anger for their own ends. Revolts against corrupt elite institutions can usher in reform and progress, but they can also create a space for the ugliest tribal impulses: xenophobia, authoritarianism, racism, fascism. One sees all of that, both good and bad, manifesting in the anti-establishment movements throughout the U.S., Europe, and the U.K. — including Brexit. All of this can be invigorating, or promising, or destabilizing, or dangerous: most likely a combination of all that.

The solution is not to subserviently cling to corrupt elite institutions out of fear of the alternatives. It is, instead, to help bury those institutions and their elite mavens and then fight for superior replacements. As Hayes put it in his book, the challenge is “directing the frustration, anger, and alienation we all feel into building a trans-ideological coalition that can actually dislodge the power of the post-meritocratic elite. One that marshals insurrectionist sentiment without succumbing to nihilism and manic, paranoid distrust.”

Corrupt elites always try to persuade people to continue to submit to their dominance in exchange for protection from forces that are even worse. That’s their game. But at some point, they themselves, and their prevailing order, become so destructive, so deceitful, so toxic, that their victims are willing to gamble that the alternatives will not be worse, or at least, they decide to embrace the satisfaction of spitting in the faces of those who have displayed nothing but contempt and condescension for them.

There is no single, unifying explanation for Brexit, Trumpism, or the growing extremism of various stripes throughout the West, but this sense of angry impotence — an inability to see any option other than smashing those responsible for their plight — is undoubtedly a major factor. As Bevins put it, supporters of Trump, Brexit, and other anti-establishment movements “are motivated not so much by whether they think the projects will actually work, but more by their desire to say * YOU” to those they believe (with very good reason) have failed them.

Obviously, those who are the target of this anti-establishment rage — political, economic, and media elites — are desperate to exonerate themselves, to demonstrate that they bear no responsibility for the suffering masses that are now refusing to be compliant and silent. The easiest course to achieve that goal is simply to demonize those with little power, wealth, or possibility as stupid and racist: This is only happening because they are primitive and ignorant and hateful, not because they have any legitimate grievances or because I or my friends or my elite institutions have done anything wrong. As Vice’s Michael Tracey put it:


Because that reaction is so self-protective and self-glorifying, many U.S. media elites — including those who knew almost nothing about Brexit until 48 hours ago — instantly adopted it as their preferred narrative for explaining what happened, just as they’ve done with Trump, Corbyn, Sanders, and any number of other instances where their entitlement to rule has been disregarded. They are so persuaded of their own natural superiority that any factions who refuse to see it and submit to it prove themselves, by definition, to be regressive, stunted, and amoral.

INDEED, MEDIA REACTION to the Brexit vote — filled with unreflective rage, condescension, and contempt toward those who voted wrong — perfectly illustrates the dynamics that caused all of this in the first place. Media elites, by virtue of their position, adore the status quo. It rewards them, vests them with prestige and position, welcomes them into exclusive circles, allows them to be close to (if not wield) great power while traveling their country and the world, provides them with a platform, and fills them with esteem and purpose. The same is true of academic elites, financial elites, and political elites. Elites love the status quo that has given them, and then protected, their elite position.


Because of how generally satisfied they are with their lot, they regard with affection and respect the internationalist institutions that safeguard the West’s prevailing order: the World Bank and IMF, NATO and the West’s military forces, the Federal Reserve, Wall Street, the EU. While they express some piecemeal criticisms of each, they literally cannot comprehend how anyone would be fundamentally disillusioned by and angry with these institutions, let alone want to break from them. They are far removed from the suffering that causes those anti-establishment sentiments. So they search and search in vain for some rationale that could explain something like Brexit — or the establishment-condemning movements on the right and left — and can find only one way to process it: These people are not motivated by any legitimate grievances or economic suffering, but instead they are just broken, ungrateful, immoral, hateful, racist, and ignorant.


Of course, it is the case that some, perhaps much of the support given to these anti-establishment movements is grounded in those sorts of ugly sentiments. But it’s also the case that the media elites’ revered establishment institutions in finance, media, and politics are driven by all sorts of equally ugly impulses, as the rotted fruit of their actions conclusively proves.

Even more important, the mechanism that Western citizens are expected to use to express and rectify dissatisfaction — elections — has largely ceased to serve any corrective function. As Hayes, in a widely cited tweet, put it this week about Brexit:


But that is exactly the choice presented not only by Brexit but also Western elections generally, including the 2016 Clinton v. Trump general election (just look at the powerful array of Wall Street tycoons and war-loving neocons that — long before Trump — viewed the former Democratic New York senator and secretary of state as their best hope for having their agenda and interests served). When democracy is preserved only in form, structured to change little to nothing about power distribution, people naturally seek alternatives for the redress of their grievances, particularly when they suffer.

More importantly still — and directly contrary to what establishment liberals love to claim in order to demonize all who reject their authority — economic suffering and xenophobia/racism are not mutually exclusive. The opposite is true: The former fuels the latter, as sustained economic misery makes people more receptive to tribalistic scapegoating. That’s precisely why plutocratic policies that deprive huge portions of the population of basic opportunity and hope are so dangerous. Claiming that supporters of Brexit or Trump or Corbyn or Sanders or anti-establishment European parties on the left and right are motivated only by hatred but not genuine economic suffering and political oppression is a transparent tactic for exonerating status quo institutions and evading responsibility for doing anything about their core corruption.

Part of this spiteful media reaction to Brexit is grounded in a dreary combination of sloth and habit: A sizable portion of the establishment liberal commentariat in the West has completely lost the ability to engage with any sort of dissent from its orthodoxies or even understand those who disagree. They are capable of nothing beyond adopting the smuggest, most self-satisfied posture, then spouting clichés to dismiss their critics as ignorant, benighted bigots. Like the people of the West who bomb Muslim countries and then express confusion that anyone wants to attack them back, the most simple-minded of these establishment media liberals are constantly enraged that the people they endlessly malign as ignorant haters refuse to vest them with the respect and credibility to which they are naturally entitled.

BUT THERE’S SOMETHING deeper and more interesting driving the media reaction here. Establishment journalistic outlets are not outsiders. They’re the opposite: They are fully integrated into elite institutions, are tools of those institutions, and thus identify fully with them. Of course they do not share, and cannot understand, anti-establishment sentiments: They are the targets of this establishment-hating revolt as much as anyone else. These journalists’ reaction to this anti-establishment backlash is a form of self-defense. As NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen put it last night, “Journalists today report on hostility to the political class, as if they had nothing to do with it,” but they are a key part of that political class and, for that reason, “if the population — or part of it — is in revolt against the political class, this is a problem for journalism.”

There are many factors explaining why establishment journalists now have almost no ability to stem the tide of anti-establishment rage, even when it’s irrational and driven by ignoble impulses. Part of it is that the internet and social media have rendered them irrelevant, unnecessary to disseminate ideas. Part of it is that they have nothing to say to people who are suffering and angry — due to their distance from them — other than to scorn them as hateful losers. Part of it is that journalists — like anyone else — tend to react with bitterness and rage, not self-assessment, as they lose influence and stature.

But a major factor is that many people recognize that establishment journalists are an integral part of the very institutions and corrupted elite circles that are authors of their plight. Rather than mediating or informing these political conflicts, journalists are agents of the forces that are oppressing people. And when journalists react to their anger and suffering by telling them that it’s invalid and merely the byproduct of their stupidity and primitive resentments, that only reinforces the perception that journalists are their enemy, thus rendering journalistic opinion increasingly irrelevant.


Brexit — despite all the harm it is likely to cause and all the malicious politicians it will empower — could have been a positive development. But that would require that elites (and their media outlets) react to the shock of this repudiation by spending some time reflecting on their own flaws, analyzing what they have done to contribute to such mass outrage and deprivation, in order to engage in course correction. Exactly the same potential opportunity was created by the Iraq debacle, the 2008 financial crisis, the rise of Trumpism and other anti-establishment movements: This is all compelling evidence that things have gone very wrong with those who wield the greatest power, that self-critique in elite circles is more vital than anything.


But, as usual, that’s exactly what they most refuse to do. Instead of acknowledging and addressing the fundamental flaws within themselves, they are devoting their energies to demonizing the victims of their corruption, all in order to delegitimize those grievances and thus relieve themselves of responsibility to meaningfully address them. That reaction only serves to bolster, if not vindicate, the animating perceptions that these elite institutions are hopelessly self-interested, toxic, and destructive and thus cannot be reformed but rather must be destroyed. That, in turn, only ensures there will be many more Brexits, and Trumps, in our collective future.

CONTACT THE AUTHOR:
Glenn Greenwald
✉glenn.greenwald@​theintercept.com

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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
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http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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Whitehall_Bin_Men
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fury over legal bid to BLOCK EU exit: Top lawyers in threat to referendum vote & DEMOCRACY
TOP lawyers are launching a bid to stop the Government pulling out of the EU.
By DAVID MADDOX
00:01, Mon, Jul 4, 2016 | UPDATED: 09:01, Mon, Jul 4, 2016
http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/685873/Lawyers-referendum-result-lega l-bid-block-Brexit-EU-leave

There was outrage and warnings of riots on the streets after law firm Mishcon de Reya prepared to lodge a plea at the High Court today. It would force MPs to pass an Act of Parliament before starting the departure from the EU.

It would block the new Prime Minister from triggering Article 50 in the Lisbon Treaty, which begins Britain’s departure from the EU. The move would mean that the Government could not leave the EU quickly.

One of the frontrunners for the Tory leadership, Andrea Leadsom, has said she wants to trigger Article 50 “as soon as possible”. If successful the legal bid could allow pro-Remain MPs to get together to block the result of the referendum with 52 per cent voting to end Brussels rule.

Labour MP David Lammy has already said he wants to ignore the democratic decision of British voters and block the result in Parliament. The challenge followed a demand by former Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair for there to be a second referendum on the final deal with the EU.

The attempt to block the implementation of Article 50 was described as a 'disgrace'
Tory MEP David Campbell Bannerman, a leading figure in Vote Leave, said the legal challenge was a “disgrace”.

The result of the referendum is not in doubt

Kasra Nouroozi, of Mishcon de Reya
He said he believed that it would fail because the original European Communities Act 1972 allowed the Government to initiate changes to treaties with the EU, including departure.

But he added: “This sort of attempt to subvert a clear democratic result is disgraceful. We saw from Tony Blair today and other interventions that there is now an attempt by Remain supporters to overturn this result.

_________________
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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 04, 2016 5:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Must have been vote rigging that got a Brexit majority---who are these 17million people!!!
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Referendum result is dodgy. Google trends spy on everyone and push the hot agenda. The agenda was immigration, which is quite absurd and there is no way the promises on immigration can be met.

Also, the EU must have a thousand different issues at least, narrowing it down to xenophobia, you narrow the debate down into sound bites for a so called democratic country and fail to mention the other 999 issues.

It's not to inform the public, but to dis-inform them. I'd say it goes as far as lobbying as opposed to having a balanced and impartial debate.

Like i've said, this has nothing to do with the democratic vote, if, for example, the remain campaign consistently lied and dis-informed the public.

The public vote was, i think, 52 - 48%, and for that we have what benefits to the people who voted to leave?

Someone will need to explain exactly what these are and who benefits, and who picks up the bill.

Will Brexit bring in more jobs?

Does Britain even exist? According to the UN, England Scotland Northern Ireland and Wales don't exist. We are, right now the United Kingdom, Great Britain does not, i repeat, does not exist. Which makes a mockery of what Brexit is supposed to stand for.

Taking our country back seems to be based on xenophobia and essentially all those wishing to create monopolies outside regulated trade zones.

So it's great for those who operate this way, like the Robber Barons, they operated the same ideology. You can't have a Monopoly in the US, but you can abroad without those same guiding principles and it's those making it rich in offshore conglomerates, who are most frustrated they can't make even more money.

So, you can add greed to the agenda, corporate greed at that.

Complete incompetency can also be added with Boris talking up Bank of England reports and admitting he hadn't even read the report. Not only did they not read it and preach it as gospel, it took the much hated Alex Salmond to point out Boris and co, also couldn't do the math regarding the data of how immigration affects wages, a complete lie, not an honest mistake.

So now when all these corporate lobbyists and the sons of Thatcher run away, that should tell you just how popular leave is with the left. The left being largely the non-violent side of the country.

If we have this rise from the right and UKIP emerge as the second party, you will see massive emigration, which is a far greater problem than immigration.

But i can categorically say well done to everyone who voted, the EU has no right to say it's a gang and when people try to leave gangs it often turns out bad. Nobody has the right to say that to any country.

I voted to leave, simply because i could. That's not necessarily voting "democratically", essentially because there was no democratic process involved in the lead up to election day.

You simply cannot claim that democracy exists for one day, then disappears, everyone gets shafted, the corporations being the ones to guide us from here to eternity.

It's a mess, a complete shambles, one which i'm finding quite interesting to sit back and watch unfold, where contradictions are allowed to select the parts of history you don't like, and completely disregard our own failings on international policy. This is the latest one of those.

My own guess is this is roughly how it went down.

Turkey and Russia get together to encourage mass immigration to the Euro zone. Scotland leaves the union (the United Kingdom), England votes to leave the EU. What exactly does that leave us?

Westminster or Brussels isn't the choice, the choice is face abandonment in an ever increasing population boom for England, due to mass unemployment.

That's a far bigger risk than having to actually put people in the European parliament who aren't actually just there to disrupt.

I'll tell you how far democracy goes in this country.

During the European Parliament elections, in Scotland 2.4% of the population turned out to vote. So go and look at the front page of the Daily Mail in England, telling those in England to go out and vote, and giving those in Scotland a completely different front page story. Encouraging a low turn does not help democarcy.

It is so bad, nobody barely knew a vote was happening.

So democracy, i'm afraid does not exist unless you have a fair and balanced reflective media, passing the same message to Scotland and England. Otherwise, it's a trading cabal oligarchy in the back pocket of America and i can assure you, if America goes, we go with them.

America doesn't want a strong Europe. 500million in the Eurozone potentially buries silicon valley and instead what we now have is a bubble in the infotech sector, and a mobilized, potentially violent right wing movement up against the left, which is exactly the point to keep the banks and the Royal family safe.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 1:00 pm    Post subject: Brexit and immigration Reply with quote

More evidence that concern about immigration is not related to the impact of immigration on people. Concern about immigration is motivated by xenophobia.

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/it-is-the-perception-of-immig ration-levels-rather-than-actual-change-in-local-areas-that-explains-t he-ukip-vote/?utm_content=buffer1591b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twi tter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
LSE report on support for UKIP and the perception of immigration

Quote:
How well do levels of immigration among these groups correspond with UKIP support? Figure 3 shows the share of electorate voting UKIP in May 2015 general election. As we can see, the hypothesis that UKIP vote is driven by experience of change in the local area can be rejected – in fact Pearson correlations between UKIP vote and increases in the share of each immigrant group are negative.

Correlation % UKIP vote Perception of Increase in share of:
Immigration levels
White foreign-born -0.22 -0.14
Non-white UK born -0.07 -0.08
Non-white foreign-born -0.19 -0.19

Interestingly, what seems to be correlated with UKIP vote is the perception of levels of immigration (Spearman correlation 0.54). In three waves of British Election Study available for 2014, respondents were asked whether they think that immigration levels are getting higher or lower (with answers recorded on a five point ordered scale where 1 stood for “getting much lower” and 5 “getting much higher”). It is known that people tend to overestimate the share of immigrants (for instance Ipsos 2014 report shows that British respondents think that 31 per cent of population consists of foreign-born respondents, where the figure is closer to 13 per cent according to 2011 Census); here we also show that people’s estimations of levels of immigration do not correspond to actual change in their local areas, it is the perception that seems to be linked with anti-immigration vote.
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 3:40 pm    Post subject: Re: Brexit and immigration Reply with quote

In 1975 UK had full employment
Now....?

Nearly two-thirds of children in poverty live in working families
Authors: Chris Belfield , Jonathan Cribb , Andrew Hood and Robert Joyce
Rising employment between 2009–10 and 2013–14 led to increases in the proportion of children living with working parents. At the same time, falls in real earnings reduced the incomes of working families. These two contrasting trends led to absolute child poverty remaining unchanged overall in this period. However, the proportion of children in poverty living in a working family rose from 54% in 2009–10 to 63% by 2013–14.
These are among the findings of a new report by IFS researchers published today: Living Standards, Poverty and Inequality in the UK: 2015, funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. The research uses data on household incomes from the government’s Households Below Average Income series, recently made available up to and including the financial year 2013–14.
Key findings on trends in child poverty include:
Between 2009–10 and 2013–14, the proportion of children in workless families fell from 18% to 16%. This reduced absolute child poverty by more than 1 percentage point (see notes to editors for cash-terms poverty lines for different family types).

Over the same period, increased rates of poverty within working families acted to increase absolute child poverty by more than 2ppt. This was caused primarily by falling real earnings. The rate of absolute child poverty in working families rose from 19% to 21%.

Benefit cuts over this parliament will put upward pressure on absolute poverty for working-age households – including those in work. The planned rises in the minimum wage will help many of those on the lowest hourly pay, but are smaller in overall magnitude than the benefit cuts and less tightly targeted on low-income households.
Looking at other measures of low living standards and financial difficulties:
Among those in income poverty, ‘material deprivation’ (according to what families say they cannot afford) is much higher for social renters, lone parents and disabled people than for owner-occupiers, the self-employed and those with some savings. In fact, among families with children, social renters with incomes (after housing costs) around the median are at least as likely to be materially deprived as the lowest-income owner-occupiers. This illustrates the importance of looking at more than just current income to understand low living standards.

Cuts to council tax support and the introduction of the so-called ‘bedroom tax’ in 2013–14 both seem to have caused clear increases in arrears, on council tax and rent respectively. Council tax arrears among working-age recipients of council tax support rose by 10ppt in areas that introduced the highest minimum council tax payments (above 20%), but fell in areas with no minimum payment. Rent arrears increased by 8ppt for those likely to be affected by the so-called ‘bedroom tax’, but were essentially unchanged for other working-age social tenants on housing benefit.
The report also examines changes in average living standards:
By 2013–14, real median household income was almost back to its pre-recession (2007–0Cool level though still 2.4% below its 2009–10 peak. Pensioners have done much better than average: median pensioner income in 2013–14 was 7.0% above its 2007–08 level, while median non-pensioner income was still 2.7% below.

Recent income growth has been much weaker than in the equivalent periods around previous recessions. Median income in 2013–14, four years after the peak, was about the same as seven years earlier in 2006–07. Over the corresponding seven-year period around previous recessions in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, median income grew by between 13% and 17%. This mostly reflects slow growth before and after the recession, rather than particularly large peak-to-trough falls in income.
The report also analyses changes in inequality, over the short and longer run:
Inequality amongst the majority of the population has fallen since 1990. In 2013–14, incomes at the 90th percentile were 3.8 times those at the 10th percentile, compared with 4.4 times in 1990. Much of this fall has happened since the recession.

But the top 1% have been taking an increasing share of household income, up from 5.7% in 1990, to 8.4% in 2007–08 prior to the crisis (and 8.3% in 2013–14).

The fall in inequality partly reflects the ‘catch-up’ of pensioners. The median pensioner now has a higher income than the median non-pensioner (after accounting for housing costs), having been more than 30% poorer in 1990.

Workless households have also been catching up with those in work. Excluding pensioners, median income (after housing costs) for workless households is 46% of the median among working households, up from 39% in 1990.

Inequality among working households was rising before the recession, but has fallen since 2007–08. This fall reflects the fact that lower-earning working households get more support from in-work benefits, which have been more stable than earnings.
“The recent stability in absolute income poverty among children has masked important and offsetting trends,” said Chris Belfield, a Research Economist at the IFS, and an author of the report. “Since 2009–10, a fall in the number of workless families has acted to reduce poverty, but this has been offset by a substantial rise in in-work poverty. This largely reflects the wider nature of the labour market since the recession: robust employment and weak earnings.”

http://www.ifs.org.uk/publications/7880

insidejob wrote:
More evidence that concern about immigration is not related to the impact of immigration on people. Concern about immigration is motivated by xenophobia.

http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/politicsandpolicy/it-is-the-perception-of-immig ration-levels-rather-than-actual-change-in-local-areas-that-explains-t he-ukip-vote/?utm_content=buffer1591b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twi tter.com&utm_campaign=buffer
LSE report on support for UKIP and the perception of immigration

Quote:
How well do levels of immigration among these groups correspond with UKIP support? Figure 3 shows the share of electorate voting UKIP in May 2015 general election. As we can see, the hypothesis that UKIP vote is driven by experience of change in the local area can be rejected – in fact Pearson correlations between UKIP vote and increases in the share of each immigrant group are negative.

Correlation % UKIP vote Perception of Increase in share of:
Immigration levels
White foreign-born -0.22 -0.14
Non-white UK born -0.07 -0.08
Non-white foreign-born -0.19 -0.19

Interestingly, what seems to be correlated with UKIP vote is the perception of levels of immigration (Spearman correlation 0.54). In three waves of British Election Study available for 2014, respondents were asked whether they think that immigration levels are getting higher or lower (with answers recorded on a five point ordered scale where 1 stood for “getting much lower” and 5 “getting much higher”). It is known that people tend to overestimate the share of immigrants (for instance Ipsos 2014 report shows that British respondents think that 31 per cent of population consists of foreign-born respondents, where the figure is closer to 13 per cent according to 2011 Census); here we also show that people’s estimations of levels of immigration do not correspond to actual change in their local areas, it is the perception that seems to be linked with anti-immigration vote.

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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2016 6:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The dates seem to correlate with the energy crisis.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000s_energy_crisis
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 07, 2016 10:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peer calls for Government to repeal the European Communities Act 1972
http://www.theunituk.org.uk/2016/06/29/editorial-peer-calls-for-govern ment-to-repeal-the-european-communities-act-1972/

Peer calls for Government to repeal the European Communities Act 1972 rather than go “cap in hand to Brussels for permission to leave”

The independent Labour Peer, Lord Stoddart of Swindon, has welcomed the result of the referendum but has some strong words of advice for the Government about how to take Britain out of the EU.
Lord Stoddart said: “What wonderful people the British are to have resisted all the threats, the denigration of their country by their own rulers, big business, big bureaucracy and intervention by arrogant foreign leaders. Despite all this intimidation they still voted to get their country back. We must now ensure that they are not betrayed again by their leaders.
“The first step in this should be for the Government to introduce a bill to repeal the European Communities Act 1972 and all its amendments. This would give it the authority to negotiate our exit from the EU. While this Act remains in force, we have to go on handing over vast sums of money to the EU and we are still subject to its demands.
“The preoccupation with Article 50 of the European Treaty is a red herring and requires the Government to go cap in hand to Brussels for permission to leave. We should seize the initiative and start the process of getting our country back now, not wait months for an interminable Conservative Party leadership contest, followed by several years while we await permission from Brussels to leave. The Government has the authority of the people to act and it should do so, not sit on its hands.”
Lord Stoddart said: “At the moment, Westminster seems to be playing second fiddle to the European Council. I understand that Mr Cameron is going to write to the President of the Council to set out his proposed negotiations before bringing them to Parliament. I call upon the Prime Minister to lay his proposals before Parliament in the right and proper manner and to do so before he presents them to the Council.
“I would remind Mr Cameron that he is the Prime Minister of a Government and sovereign Parliament at Westminster and he is subject to the traditional obligation of any Prime Minister, namely to consult Parliament first about this or, for that matter, any other major Governmental policy decision.
“Therefore, I have submitted a written question in the House of Lords, asking if the Prime Minister is going to consult Parliament, before going cap in hand to Brussels.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 08, 2016 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interview with Juncker and Schulz: 'Deadly for Europe'
http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/interview-with-jean-claude- juncker-and-martin-schulz-a-1102110.html

Interview Conducted by Klaus Brinkbäumer, Horand Knaup and Michael Sauga

European Parliament President Martin Schulz and European Commission President Jean-Claude JunckerZoom
Bert Bostelmann/ DER SPIEGEL
European Parliament President Martin Schulz and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker
The presidents of the European Parliament and the European Commission, Martin Schulz, 60, and Jean-Claude Juncker, 61, talk about the consequences of the Brexit vote, the failures of EU leaders and their early morning phone calls.

Brexit
All Articles
SPIEGEL: Mr. Juncker, who was the first person you talked to after hearing the news of Brexit?

Juncker: With Martin Schulz. He's in the habit of talking to me on the phone each morning between 7 and 8 a.m. It's a habit I sometimes wish he could drop.

Schulz: I seem to remember it being between 6 and 7 a.m. I was shocked. In the days before the vote, I bet that the British would stay in the EU.

Juncker: I put my money on Brexit. The EU Financial Stability Commissioner, Jonathan Hill from Britain, still owes me a pound. (Eds. Note: Hill announced his resignation from the Commission in the wake of the Brexit vote.)

SPIEGEL: What did you say on the phone?

Schulz: I said: "Jean-Claude, I think this isn't going well." Then I advocated for a quick response from the EU. The last thing we need right now is uncertainty.

Juncker: I shared his opinion. It was important for the Brits to trigger Article 50 as quickly as possible in order to avoid any uncertainties. That was also the tenor of the press release the European Commission, Parliament and Council issued afterward.

SPIEGEL: Just like on that Friday, you often present yourselves as extremely tight political partners. Can you appreciate that some in Europe see your relationship as cronyism?

Juncker: Nonsense. Martin and I lead the two important community institutions, whose tasks include working together in confidence. After 30 years in Brussels, I can tell you: The relationship between the Commission and the Parliament has probably never been as good as it is now.

SPIEGEL: That's precisely what many people find problematic. Parliaments are ultimately responsible for keeping governments in check -- not acting as their reinforcements.

Schulz: There can be no talk of reinforcements. Jean-Claude and I are fully aware that we have different roles. There's also friction between us, for instance with the agreement for visa liberalization for Turkey. The Commission sent us a proposal. While 66 of our 72 conditions had been met, many of the most important ones had not been, including the reform of anti-terror laws. So we put the agreement on ice. The Commission very often has a very unpleasant time in Parliament.

Juncker: I don't let it get to me. I said in my inaugural address that I am not the Council's secretary, nor am I the Parliament's lackey. That can sometimes lead to conflicts, which are defused through dialogue. Martin invariably knows what the Commission thinks, and I'm well informed about the sensitivities of the Parliament.

SPIEGEL: The day after Brexit, Martin Schulz and Sigmar Gabriel, who is the head of Germany's Social Democratic Party (SPD), to which Schulz belongs, presented plans for sweeping reform in the EU. These plans foresee turning the Commission into a proper European government, one that is regulated by the European Parliament and by a kind of federal council of member states. The plan would mean a significant loss of power for member state governments. What do you think of the plan?

Juncker: The proposal in and of itself is convincing, but it doesn't suit the times. To implement it, the European treaties would have to be amended. Martin's plan is a long-term project that cannot currently be implemented due to the mood on the continent. But where the community can achieve more on the basis of existing treaties, we should do so.

Schulz: I completely agree with Jean-Claude. I'm fully aware that my vision of a European bicameral parliament can't be implemented tomorrow. I'm also not an integration fanatic. We agree: Brussels can't regulate everything. I'm driven by something else: There are forces in Europe that want to generally give national policy priority over a common European approach. We have to prevent this.

SPIEGEL: Nevertheless, many in Europe see you as being symbolic of the backroom technocratic politics that is associated with the European Union and the euro. Some have even accused you of being responsible for Brexit. Do you plead guilty?

Juncker: No, why should I? In the end, the British didn't vote to leave because of the euro. They're not even members of the currency union. Even the refugee crisis hardly affected the country. I have another explanation: In its 43 years of EU membership, Britain has never been able to decide whether it wants to fully or only partially belong to the EU.

Schulz: Primary responsibility for Brexit lies with British conservatives, who took an entire continent hostage. First, David Cameron initiated the referendum in order to secure his post. Now, fellow conservatives want to delay the start of exit negotiations until they've held a party conference. And regarding detractors: I'm proud of the fact that Ms. Le Pen in France insults me and Mr. Wilders in the Netherlands calls me his opponent. The way I see it is, if these people weren't attacking me, I would be doing something wrong.

SPIEGEL: Criticism isn't only coming from right-wing populists. Mr. Juncker, the Polish and Czech foreign ministers have called for your resignation. They feel the Commission is too domineering.

Juncker: After these reports came across the wire, I spent hours sitting at the same table as the Polish prime minister at the European Council. She made no mention of any resignation. And the Czech prime minister assured me during a recent visit that he thought I should definitely stay in office.

SPIEGEL: Do you deny that a number of Eastern European countries feel that the Commission has been too domineering -- with the specification that quotas be established for accepting refugees, for example?

Juncker: I have a different understanding of the word "specification." Sure, the Commission suggested the quota, but it was the council of interior ministers that ratified it with a qualified majority. Furthermore, the Commission helped negotiate the agreement with Turkey and thus delivered the decisive contribution to solving the refugee crisis.

SPIEGEL: Eastern Europeans see it differently. In their eyes, it was the border closures along the Balkan route that led to the numbers dropping.

Juncker: Without the Turkey agreement, tens of thousands of refugees would still be stuck in Greece. The Commission presented proposals for securing Europe's external borders early on, but they languished in the Council for months. As you can see, the Commission isn't asleep. Oftentimes it has to wake up the others.

SPIEGEL: Do you also need to be woken up, Mr. Schulz?

Schulz: Not at all. It's long been routine that member states blame the Commission for everything they can't agree upon. The scapegoat is always Jean-Claude Juncker. Should I give you a few examples?

SPIEGEL: Please.

Schulz: The plan for a financial transaction tax has been ready for years, but the member states can't come to an agreement. To combat terrorism, the European Parliament hurriedly passed a law for gathering passenger data -- but it then took the interior ministers months to sign off on it while at the same time, the automatic exchange of data was rejected. Those are two examples among many. If cooperation among governments were the superior concept for progress in Europe, I'd be onboard immediately. But the problem is that cooperation isn't working.

SPIEGEL: For the citizens of Europe, it's not that important who is to blame. What bothers them is the constant jockeying for power and jurisdiction and the fact that European processes are so lengthy and opaque.

Schulz: It's true. For many people, politics in Brussels and Strasbourg might as well be happening on another planet. Just come to Brussels after a Council meeting. Do you know what happens? Every head of government holds his or her own press conference. They all say the same thing, in 24 languages: I was able to push through my agenda. And if the result is anything other than what they desired, the message is: Brussels is to blame. It has been this way for over 20 years. These messages stick with people, and that's deadly for Europe.

Juncker: On top of that, there is a distorted perception of what goes on in Brussels. No one reports on the Commission taking a hundred initiatives from its predecessor off the table in order to shift competencies back to member state governments. Stories are invented: Juncker wants to introduce the euro everywhere or immediately deepen the EU -- although I publicly stated the opposite that same day. This doesn't just happen -- it happens in order to weaken the European institutions.

SPIEGEL: What are you doing to stop it?

Schulz: Not being opportunistic. It's not attractive at the moment to vouch for the European idea. I still do it, because I believe nothing would be better for our continent. Complementing the nation-state as it reaches its limits amid globalization: That is what Europe must offer.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Juncker, you have always presented yourself as an admirer of the great European politician Helmut Kohl. But Kohl has been rather critical recently. Today, less Europe is more Europe, he said. And he criticized some people in Brussels who he said were confusing a united Europe with a uniform Europe. Do you feel as though he's talking about you?

Juncker: Not at all. I completely agree with Helmut Kohl. I am not an advocate of the "United States of Europe," nor am I an integration fanatic. You can't deepen the European Union against the wishes of the European countries.

SPIEGEL: Kohl also said Europe must return to being a community committed to stability and the rule of law. The former German chancellor was referring to the exceptions that you have granted to France, Spain and Portugal on euro-zone deficit criteria.

Juncker: Those weren't exceptions. Rather, the Commission applied the Stability Pact as it is currently formulated. We no longer have the pact from 1997; it was radically amended in 2005 and the Commission is applying this Stability Pact with wisdom and rationality. France finds itself in a difficult economic situation and the government has taken several measures to bring order to the public budget. In doing so, France is conforming to the law. And the Commission is making decisions on the basis of applicable laws, which I recommend reading.

SPIEGEL: You didn't justify the exceptions economically, but with the fact that presidential elections are soon to take place in the country.

Juncker: I cannot recall the Commission ever referencing elections in any of its resolutions. It could be that some commissioners said something to that effect. It also wouldn't be prudent to slap a country down prior to elections. But that wasn't the reason for our decision. The reason was that the Stability Pact provides justification for this decision.

SPIEGEL: The pact codifies limits of sovereign debt. France intends to exceed them. That's a clear violation, isn't it?

Juncker: The pact allows for the consideration of positive forecasts when sanctioning earlier violations. That is why we will soon be speaking with the Portuguese and Spanish governments to ascertain whether the two countries have the willingness and the ability to get their economies structurally back on the right track.

SPIEGEL: The free trade agreement with Canada, known as CETA, is also controversial. First, you said the final decision should be made by the EU. But then, after Sigmar Gabriel, the head of Germany's Social Democrats (SPD), called your approach "unbelievably misguided," member state parliaments are now going to be allowed a say in the decision. What was the reason for the about-face?

Juncker: Your description isn't accurate. The fact is, according to a legal opinion from the Commission, this treaty is an EU-only treaty. But I'm not deaf and the Commission isn't operating in a parallel world of legal texts. That's why we decided to treat this agreement as a hybrid treaty. All EU heads of state and government have agreed with me that this agreement is the best that we could have negotiated. Now, they have the opportunity to show strong leadership and make the agreement their own.

Schulz: Jean-Claude is right. The Canadian government made significant concessions on the controversial question of the dispute settlement courts and it recognized the norms of the International Labor Organization. Both were European demands that have now been pushed through. As such, CETA also set the standard for the upcoming trade talks with the US.

SPIEGEL: You don't just agree on questions of European and trade policy. You have also emphasized that you are bound by a close personal bond. What is special about your friendship?

Schulz: I agree with the aphorism: "Friends are those who stay when everyone else leaves." I have never been in a situation when companions have abandoned me. But I am certain that, were it to come to that, Jean-Claude would be there.

Juncker: In politics, there are different categories of friendship. My friendship with Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, for example ...

SPIEGEL: ... which was especially apparent at the height of the Greek crisis …...

Juncker: …... I would describe that as a utilitarian friendship. At the time, his country was facing the prospect of leaving the euro zone and many Greeks felt abandoned by Europe. In such a situation, it seemed appropriate to me to present myself as a friend to Greece. It had to do with the country's dignity. My friendship with Martin, by contrast, is completely different in that it goes far beyond politics.

SPIEGEL: How did it begin?

Schulz: We got to know each other at an award ceremony in Aachen (Eds. Note: the prestigious Charlemagne Prize, awarded annually by the German city of Aachen). At the time, Jean-Claude was already an important man in Brussels. I was a young representative in the European Parliament. We talked for a long time and from that point on, our connection became increasingly deep. But our working-class origins are at least as important to our bond.

Juncker: My father was a steel worker and Martin's grandfather was a miner in Saarland. In these occupations, there is a particular awareness of solidarity. That creates links that aren't present in other relationships.

Schulz: There is an additional biographical parallel. Your father, Jean-Claude, was forcibly drafted into the Wehrmacht (Eds. Note: Germany's Nazi-era military). He was badly wounded and ended up as a prisoner of war in Russia. My mother's brother was killed while clearing mines in 1945. Those are things that mark your childhood and they help explain why we are so devoted to European unity.

Juncker: I have always considered it to be a minor miracle that after the war, people in Europe's border regions were able to forget everything and, in accordance with the slogan "Never Again War," develop a program that still works today. It is always said that Europe is a project of the elite. That's incorrect. In fact, it was a concern of the soldiers who fought at the front, the concentration camp prisoners and the Trümmerfrauen (Eds. Note: The women in Germany who helped clear away the rubble following World War II). It was they who said, we're going to do everything differently now. De Gaulle and Adenauer merely acted upon this desire.

SPIEGEL: Oskar Lafontaine, the former SPD leader who resigned as party leader in 1999 and moved to the Left Party in 2005, once said that there are no real friendships in politics, merely temporary alliances of convenience.

Juncker: Lafontaine has certainly proved that he adheres to his own maxim.

Schulz: I can understand Oskar. In political life, it is extremely difficult to remain loyal to a friendship when constellations of power or interests are in the way. I have friends in politics who really put the friendship to the test through their behavior.

SPIEGEL: Which friends are you referring to?

Schulz: It is an element of friendship that one not talk about everything publicly.

SPIEGEL: Your friend Juncker has also disappointed you in the past. Following the most recent elections for the European Parliament, you agreed that he would nominate you as his Commission vice president. Were you angry with him?

Schulz: Initially, yes. But then we talked about it. I told him, you promised me. He answered, that's true, but I can't keep my promise because I won't be able to push it through internally. I understood that. The most important thing is candor. In cases of lying and cheating, by contrast, the friendship usually comes to an end.

SPIEGEL: It is part of politics that one sometimes must compete for a post against one's best friend. Is power ultimately more important than friendship?

Schulz: Would I sacrifice a friendship to take a step forward in my political career? Thus far in my political career, I have been spared from having to make such a decision, thank God. And I can't imagine what it must be like.

SPIEGEL: Have you ever done so, Mr. Juncker?

Juncker: No, my friends have thus far protected me from such decisions. One can't allow blind loyalty to a friendship to lead one away from acting in the public interest. If Martin were to propose something that was totally absurd, our friendship would not prevent me from doing the opposite.

SPIEGEL: Have you ever had to reject a proposal from Schulz?

Juncker: That we aren't always of the same opinion is something that comes up constantly. Then, we talk about it. Europe is a democracy and differences of opinion are part of it. The problem is: When two governments or institutions in Europe hold differing opinions, it is immediately a crisis. If in Germany the government, the Bundesrat (Eds. Note: Germany's second parliamentary body representing the interests of the states) and the state parliaments aren't in agreement, nobody questions the survival of the republic. I'm always quite amazed that people in Europe become unnerved when two institutions or two people have different views.

SPIEGEL: In your friendship, do you also talk about private things?

Schulz: Yes.

SPIEGEL: Recently, there have been reports about the state of Juncker's health and his alcohol consumption. Have you talked about that?

Schulz: Of course. We exchanged our aggravation over the platitudes that have been disseminated. Jean-Claude has one of the most stressful and difficult jobs. The fact that one sometimes seems tired is unavoidable. Many reports are obviously part of a political campaign, no doubt.

SPIEGEL: What is your response, Mr. Juncker?

Juncker: I said in Parliament that I am neither sick nor tired. Period.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Schulz is approaching the halfway point of the legislative term as president of European Parliament and, according to the deal, the post must then be handed to a conservative. Are you also in favor of a change, Mr. Juncker?

Juncker: I am in favor of the European institutions being led for the next two-and-a-half years as they have been thus far. We need stability.

SPIEGEL: The conservative fraction, your fraction, may see things differently.

Juncker: Europe is facing difficult times and at such a moment it is good for Brussels institutions to work well together. That works great at the moment with the two floor leaders, my friend Manfred Weber and my comrade Gianni Pittella, and the same holds true for Council President Donald Tusk. I don't see why we shouldn't continue with a proven team.

SPIEGEL: Are you saying that as a politician or as a friend?

Juncker: I am saying that as a politician and as a friend.

SPIEGEL: Mr. Juncker, Mr. Schulz, we thank you for this interview.

_________________
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2016 9:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why Tony Blair Must be Destroyed:
A Conservative Case
by Sean Gabb
(7th April 2003) by email

The Friday before this war started, I had dinner with some friends, where I was forced to defend my bitter dislike of Tony Blair. At the moment, nothing could be easier. The front page of my newspaper today carries one of the most disgusting photographs I have ever seen. It is of Ali Ismael Abbas, a 12 year old boy in Baghdad who had his arms blown off in a rocket attack at the weekend. His lower body appears to have been burned all over, and the smile on his face is probably the effect of the opiate he was given to block the pain. The rocket that did this may have been fired by the Americans - or even, though I doubt if they now have the means, by the Iraqis. But thanks to Mr Blair, we share in the corporate responsibility. Because of his joining us in the "coalition of the willing", it is partly in our name that this boy has had his life destroyed. Killing and maiming are always bad. I doubt at present if they can ever be right. Certainly, unless absolutely necessary, they are wrong. For me, that is reason enough for the most envenomed hatred.

However, the question was asked of me before the war started, when my opinion of Mr Blair was already fixed. This beastly war aside, what do I so dislike about him?

I will begin by conceding that my usual complaints about his domestic policies do not in themselves justify such positive loathing. Yes, he has integrated this country further into the European Union since he came to power. Yes, his other domestic policies have been directed to the creation of a sinister police state. He has done all this and is to be blamed for it. Even so, is there anyone to replace him who would not have done, or would not continue to do, very much the same?

Forget their claims, unconvincing as they are. The Conservatives are just as committed in reality to the European project. They got us into it, and have said nothing to indicate they would get us out. If possible, they are even more committed to the American alliance than Labour. Indeed, I suspect they would have us pressing on with the Americans to Damascus and Teheran, whereas many of the present Ministers seem to want this horror over for us as quickly as the soldiers can be marched out of Basra.

As for all the police state laws, these the Conservatives have failed efficiently to oppose during the past six years, or have even supported. Nor let it be forgotten that it was the Conservatives who began to demolish the Constitution when they were last in power. Can we hope for any better from them? I rather think not.

How, then, about the most likely Labour replacements of Mr Blair - Gordon Brown and David Blunkett? Would they be any better? Again, not. Mr Blunkett is hard at work outdoing both Michael Howard and Jack Straw in the attack on due process. Mr Brown might be slightly less friendly to European integration, but this cannot be taken for granted; and he seems to lack Mr Blair's belief in the marketising of public services, which is about his only worthwhile achievement.

So why hate the man? What is there to justify wanting him replaced by people who might only differ for the worse, if they differed at all?

The answer is that Mr Blair is so bad because he is so effective in the work of destruction. Let us compare England with America. The United States has a written constitution. Plainly, this has not preserved American freedom so well as its framers hoped. But at least it draws a visible boundary between what is constitutional and what is not. Everyone can see when a law crosses that boundary; and its clear wording provides a point around which libertarians and conservatives can rally—and cann sometimes rally with success. Our own constitution is different. Though it has restrained power for longer than any other, it is not written. We have fundamental laws, but they are not easily perceived, and their breach is hardly ever obvious to those without a detailed legal and historical understanding.

We are free in this country because freedom is part of our constitution as conceived in the wider, old-fashioned sense of the word. It resides in our habits of thought and action. Now, this sort of constitution derives its stability not from the wording of a written document, but from a mass of conservative prejudice. Freedom is generally an administrative inconvenience. It stands in the way of privilege for wealthy business interests. The lack of detailed policing that it requires gives offence to the various moral entrepreneurs who make their way into politics and the media. Considered alone, trial by jury is an expensive and often inaccurate means of deciding guilt. Freedom of the press allows people to say hateful things. Unlike any specific disadvantages, their benefits are hardly ever understood by the mass of people. What keeps them, and all the other freedoms and protections of freedom, reasonably safe is that they are parts of an ancient and general order of things. They are legitimised in the main less by their rightness than by the appearance that they have always existed in this country.

There can be no doubt of the many benefits that have flowed over the centuries from our Constitution. Those Americans who dismiss it as a fraud should bear in mind that their own is barely a quarter as old, and that it is already falling apart. Even so, it is peculiarly open to attack at the margins. The restraints in power in this country are largely customary. They derive their force form the fact that they exist within a web of associations that tie the present to the past. Let these associations be removed, and with them will go the old restraints on power.

That is, for example, why compulsory metrication is so objectionable. Metres are more rational than yards, and probably more useful for most purposes. Compulsion aside, it is the break with the past that is objectionable—especially when the benefits, though undeniablle, are not that great. It is the same with renaming writs as claim forms and bailiffs as enforcement agents, with changing the old forms of public address, with rearranging museum displays to make the English past shameful or incomprehensible, and with much more. Individually, these changes may be of no importance. It is their conjunction that is important. Let there be a sufficient conjunction of changes, and the setting within which freedom resides is destroyed. Disconnected from the web of associations in which they have come down to us, valuable protections like trial by jury and habeas corpus can be presented as more rubbish form the past to be cleared away—especially when they can be presentedd as hindrances to a cheaper and more efficient system of criminal justice. Unlike in America, where the Constitution must first be abolished or plainly turned on its head, we can be led into tyranny along a route where every step can be presented as of no great consequence, and where objectors can be dismissed as pedants or cranks. As Lord Eldon said against the claims for parliamentary reform—and, I am now inclined to thinkk, rightly—"Touch one atom, and the whole is lost".

What makes Mr Blair so dangerous is that he has been able, as no other politician could, to combine systematic destruction of the old order of things with reasonable economic policies in the short term, and to persuade large numbers of people for most of the time that his is not a very radical government. It is a radical government at the cultural level, but his genius has been to conceal this. I had lunch last month with a highly intelligent friend from my university days who announced as if it were an incontestable truth that "Tony Blair is the best Tory Prime Minister this country has ever had". Not so. He is the least Tory. His most honest statement of intent was his speech to the 1999 Labour Conference, in which he attacked "the forces of conservatism". It was so honest that it was soon removed from the Labour Party website. One of my friends at dinner the other week tried to claim that this was really an attack on resistance to change within the public sector. But he is wrong. I looked out the speech on The Guardian website - http://www.guardian.co.uk/lab99/Story/0,2763,202189,00.html. It is a manifesto for destroying every ancient association, so that any conservative defence of freedom—and this is the best one wee have, I repeat—becomes impossible. The New Labour project has llittle to do with overturning the economic settlement imposed by Margaret Thatcher. It is, much rather, a cultural revolution. But his charm—his ability to make radicalism look other than it is—has casst almost a magic spell over much of the English middle class.

That is why I so long for his destruction. No one else in politics would be so able to do what he has done. Take him away, and the spell would be at least weakened. The problem of who should replace him is not, on this analysis, a problem. Anyone will do. Gordon Brown might be more socialist in his economic policies—but he would not so easilyy seduce the middle class formers of opinion. Iain Duncan Smith might be even less friendly to our remaining civil liberties. Anyone else might be worse is some other respect. But there is no one else in British politics with the same lethal blend of qualities to hide the work of destruction, or to make it seem an improvement on the past.

Of course, the war may have changed this. It has wiped that boyish smile from Mr Blair's face. He has aged ten years in the past six months, and the result is not pretty. From now on, his every appearance in public will be attended by passionate demonstrations. Combine this with the unconcealable effects of his economic policies, and he may have lost his hold over the national mind. Until last year, perhaps, he could be compared to the Lloyd George of 1910—the man of the people staanding up to the forces of conservatism. He may now be compared to the Lloyd George of 1922—the dangerous adventurer surrounding himself withh all that is corrupt and all that blocks the way back to a gentler and safer and greatly more attractive past. Nothing may ever be easy for him again. Never again may his good intentions be so readily trusted. Perhaps, therefore, we have him where we want him—as the weak leader of aa weak government, able to do little more that is bad while we wait for the Conservatives or some other party of replacement to pull itself together.

On the other hand, this is not certain. A Prime Minister in being is still a Prime Minister; and events may always bring a recovery of his standing and power. And though I am not often given to explosions of moral outrage, that photograph will not quickly fade from my memory. I cannot think of it, and of our vicarious role in its production, without wanting to shout obscenities. Let him be replaced, I say, and soon. It matters not who replaces him. His continued residence in Downing Street dirties this country. He is trash, and all I really want at this moment is to know that I shall live long enough to dance on his grave.

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 17, 2016 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Theresa May promised to deliver a Brexit — but here is why we shouldn't be so sure
Adam Payne Jul. 12, 2016, 10:23 AM 3,520
http://uk.businessinsider.com/brexit-terms-under-new-conservative-prim e-minister-theresa-may-2016-7?utm_source=yahoo&utm_medium=referral

Theresa May after being confirmed as the leader of the Conservative Party and Britain's next prime minister, outside the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, central London, on Monday. Reuters
Theresa May is about to become Britain's new prime minister, but do not be so sure that she will deliver a Brexit as promised.

The current home secretary is set to be confirmed as David Cameron's successor on Wednesday evening after Andrea Leadsom dropped out of the Conservative Party leadership contest on Monday afternoon.

One of the reasons Leadsom was able to mount a challenge to May was the positive effect that her pro-Brexit campaigning had on her popularity. May, however, had campaigned for Britain to remain in the European Union.

Nonetheless, speaking in Birmingham on Monday morning, May said "Brexit means Brexit" and pledged to make a success of it.

As social-media users pointed out, though, "Brexit means Brexit" was a very vague statement. It did not even begin to indicate any form of time scale for when the country will leave the 28-nation bloc or what a post-Brexit Britain will look like.

When will May trigger Article 50?
For the UK to officially begin withdrawing from the EU, the prime minister must invoke Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. Leadsom promised that the period between the referendum result and Article 50 being triggered would be "as short as possible," but May has not made this promise.

In fact, Brits who voted Leave should not expect to see the country withdraw from the 28-nation bloc until 2019 at the very earliest under May's leadership.


In an interview with Robert Peston earlier this month, May said (emphasis ours):

"I don't think it's possible to say that there is an absolute deadline [for Article 50 to be invoked]. What is important is that we do this on the right time scale and we do it to get the right deal for the UK.

"I've said that we shouldn't invoke Article 50 immediately. It shouldn't be before the end of the year. We need to establish our own negotiating position. What's important is that we get the right deal and that's a deal which is about controlling free movement, but it's also about ensuring that we've got the best deal possible in trade of goods and services."

Given that the Article 50 process lasts two years — and can be extended if deemed necessary — it looks as if Britain won't actually leave the EU until at least 2019. Leavers, however, will probably have to wait even longer.

One reason for this is that crucial elections will take place in France and Germany next summer. With both countries being key players in the EU, it would be wise for May to wait until this electoral cycle is over so that she won't have to struggle to negotiate with leaders whose minds will be elsewhere.

Another is that it is extremely unlikely that the UK will be able to establish its negotiating position in just a few months. Business Insider spoke with constitutional expert Peter Catterall last month, and he predicted that Article 50 probably wouldn't be triggered until 2018 because the government would require this length of time to clarify which deals it could reach with other countries.

May seemed to echo this when she said the UK must secure the "right deal" before it activates Article 50. With this in mind, she may not lead the country out of the 28-nation bloc until 2020 or beyond.

You can see May discuss Article 50 in the clip below.


What will May's Brexit look like?
Like many senior politicians, May has been rather vague on the issue of negotiations. Speaking in Birmingham on Monday, she reassured pro-Brexit party members that "Brexit means Brexit" — but what does this actually mean?

Here is an excerpt from a speech May gave in April about negotiating with the EU in the scenario of Brits voting to leave the bloc. It won't fill Leavers with too much confidence.

May Brexit negotiations April 2016Gov.UK

This speech implied two things:

1) May preferred the country to remain in the single market if it voted to leave the EU.

2) But she had serious doubts about whether a future government would be able to secure the type of Brexit that many pro-Leave MPs desire — i.e., the UK remains in the single market but does not sign up to the Freedom of Movement Act.

May had every right to be skeptical, as multiple EU officials have already told the UK that it should not expect to be given exception from free-movement rules in addition to access to the single market. Donald Tusk, the European Council president, reiterated this stance last week when he said the UK could not enjoy the free market "à la carte" — suggesting that May will not be able to negotiate a deal based on single-market access without freedom of movement or even to pick what Britain wants to keep or denounce from EU membership.

So, what will Brexit actually mean?
May was lauded by MPs from both sides of the referendum debate for taking a firm stance on the UK's withdrawal from the EU. But what awaits her is a long, grueling process that will be much less straightforward than her claim that "Brexit means a Brexit" suggested.

It is also worth noting that if the activation of Article 50 is delayed until 2018, the process of leaving could easily coincide with the next general election. This scenario would have some significant implications. If the Tories win the next election, it will give May the mandate to bring the country out of the EU on the terms she deems satisfactory.

But more interesting is that May could be tasked with negotiating an acceptable Brexit while trying to win an election. The electorate may feel more positive about EU membership in four years, or conversely, it could feel that May is failing to deliver the deal that was voted for on June 23, 2016. Taking all of these considerations into account, the crucial year for UK's relationship with the EU could well be 2020, not 2016.

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2016 12:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Andrew Marr hardly bats a warmongering eyelid

Brexit: Article 50 will be triggered before next general election, Tory chairman says
Patrick McLoughlin says referendum result is binding but confesses 'technically it isn’t'
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-article-50-genera l-election-eu-referendum-leave-tory-chairman-patrick-mcloughlin-a71531 41.html

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2016 12:38 am    Post subject: Re: Delusional Leave vote Reply with quote

insidejob wrote:


The idea that 3 million Eastern Europeans has depressed the wages and displaced the jobs of 17- plus million Leave voters, including all the pensioners who voted Leave, is utter garbage. The reality is as the proportion of older people grows, the UK well need more migrants!

If you have evidence that Eastern European migration is depressing wages, please let see it.


Gordon Brown announced the end of boom and bust under capitalism.
You invert the capitalist law of supply and demand and argue that mass migration increases wages. So an oversupply of labour hasn't led to 5m on zero hour contracts. That is obviously a fiction of capitalist propaganda, Socialism is allready here but some of us ain't realised it yet.
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PostPosted: Mon Jul 25, 2016 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/brexit-a-blow-to-the-ruli ng-class/18567#.V5Vf3MTTVDs
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 12:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Pilger: Why the British Said No to Europe
By: John Pilger
Published 25 June 2016
http://www.telesurtv.net/english/opinion/John-Pilger-Why-the-British-S aid-No-to-Europe-20160625-0022.html

John Pilger strikes a blow to the hypocrisy of a wider political culture that apologizes for the crimes of the EU while denigrating the nation's poor.
The majority vote by Britons to leave the European Union was an act of raw democracy. Millions of ordinary people refused to be bullied, intimidated and dismissed with open contempt by their presumed betters in the major parties, the leaders of the business and banking oligarchy and the media.

This was, in great part, a vote by those angered and demoralized by the sheer arrogance of the apologists for the "remain" campaign and the dismemberment of a socially just civil life in Britain. The last bastion of the historic reforms of 1945, the National Health Service, has been so subverted by Tory and Labour-supported privateers it is fighting for its life.

A forewarning came when the treasurer, George Osborne, the embodiment of both Britain's ancient regime and the banking mafia in Europe, threatened to cut 30 billion pounds from public services if people voted the wrong way; it was blackmail on a shocking scale.


Immigration was exploited in the campaign with consummate cynicism, not only by populist politicians from the lunar right, but by Labour politicians drawing on their own venerable tradition of promoting and nurturing racism, a symptom of corruption not at the bottom but at the top. The reason millions of refugees have fled the Middle East—first Iraq, now Syria—are the invasions and imperial mayhem of Britain, the United States, France, the European Union and Nato. Before that, there was the willful destruction of Yugoslavia. Before that, there was the theft of Palestine and the imposition of Israel.

The pith helmets may have long gone, but the blood has never dried. A nineteenth century contempt for countries and peoples, depending on their degree of colonial usefulness, remains a centerpiece of modern "globalization," with its perverse socialism for the rich and capitalism for the poor: its freedom for capital and denial of freedom to labor; its perfidious politicians and politicized civil servants.

OPINION:
Flying the Nativist Flag: 'Brexit' and Austerity

All this has now come home to Europe, enriching the likes of Tony Blair and impoverishing and disempowering millions. On 23 June, the British said no more.

The most effective propagandists of the "European ideal" have not been the far right, but an insufferably patrician class for whom metropolitan London is the United Kingdom. Its leading members see themselves as liberal, enlightened, cultivated tribunes of the 21st century zeitgeist, even "cool." What they really are is a bourgeoisie with insatiable consumerist tastes and ancient instincts of their own superiority. In their house paper, The Guardian, they have gloated, day after day, at those who would even consider the EU profoundly undemocratic, a source of social injustice and a virulent extremism known as "neoliberalism."

The aim of this extremism is to install a permanent, capitalist theocracy that ensures a two-thirds society, with the majority divided and indebted, managed by a corporate class, and a permanent working poor. In Britain today, 63 per cent of poor children grow up in families where one member is working. For them, the trap has closed. More than 600,000 residents of Britain's second city, Greater Manchester, are, reports a study, "experiencing the effects of extreme poverty" and 1.6 million are slipping into penury.

Little of this social catastrophe is acknowledged in the bourgeois controlled media, notably the Oxbridge dominated BBC. During the referendum campaign, almost no insightful analysis was allowed to intrude upon the clichéd hysteria about "leaving Europe," as if Britain was about to be towed in hostile currents somewhere north of Iceland.


On the morning after the vote, a BBC radio reporter welcomed politicians to his studio as old chums. "Well," he said to "Lord" Peter Mandelson, the disgraced architect of Blairism, "why do these people want it so badly?" The "these people" are the majority of Britons.

The wealthy war criminal Tony Blair remains a hero of the Mandelson "European" class, though few will say so these days. The Guardian once described Blair as "mystical" and has been true to his "project" of rapacious war. The day after the vote, the columnist Martin Kettle offered a Brechtian solution to the misuse of democracy by the masses. "Now surely we can agree referendums are bad for Britain," said the headline over his full-page piece. The "we" was unexplained but understood—just as "these people" is understood. "The referendum has conferred less legitimacy on politics, not more," wrote Kettle. "The verdict on referendums should be a ruthless one. Never again."

OPINION:
John Pilger: Silencing the United States as It Prepares for War

The kind of ruthlessness Kettle longs is found in Greece, a country now airbrushed. There, they had a referendum and the result was ignored. Like the Labour Party in Britain, the leaders of the Syriza government in Athens are the products of an affluent, highly privileged, educated middle class, groomed in the fakery and political treachery of post-modernism. The Greek people courageously used the referendum to demand their government sought "better terms" with a venal status in Brussels that was crushing the life out of their country. They were betrayed, as the British would have been betrayed.

On Friday, the Labour Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, was asked by the BBC if he would pay tribute to the departed Cameron, his comrade in the "remain" campaign. Corbyn fulsomely praised Cameron's "dignity" and noted his backing for gay marriage and his apology to the Irish families of the dead of Bloody Sunday. He said nothing about Cameron's divisiveness, his brutal austerity policies, his lies about "protecting" the Health Service. Neither did he remind people of the war mongering of the Cameron government: the dispatch of British special forces to Libya and British bomb aimers to Saudi Arabia and, above all, the beckoning of world war three.

In the week of the referendum vote, no British politician and, to my knowledge, no journalist referred to Vladimir Putin's speech in St. Petersburg commemorating the 75th anniversary of Nazi Germany's invasion of the Soviet Union on 22 June, 1941. The Soviet victory—at a cost of 27 million Soviet lives and the majority of all German forces—won the Second World War.

Putin likened the current frenzied build up of NATO troops and war material on Russia's western borders to the Third Reich's Operation Barbarossa. NATO's exercises in Poland were the biggest since the Nazi invasion; Operation Anaconda had simulated an attack on Russia, presumably with nuclear weapons. On the eve of the referendum, the quisling secretary-general of NATO, Jens Stoltenberg, warned Britons they would be endangering "peace and security" if they voted to leave the EU. The millions who ignored him and Cameron, Osborne, Corbyn, Obama and the man who runs the Bank of England may, just may, have struck a blow for real peace and democracy in Europe.

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 3:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

'No real shift' towards Scottish independence since Brexit vote - poll
Despite YouGov’s findings, the SNP’s business convener professional liar Derek Mackay says many voters in Scotland are reconsidering
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jul/30/no-real-shift-towards- scottish-independence-since-brexit-vote-poll

Nadia Khomami @nadiakhomami
Saturday 30 July 2016 12.12 BST Last modified on Saturday 30 July 2016 15.20 BST

Scottish voters are reconsidering their opposition to independence after the Brexit vote, the SNP’s business convener, Derek Mackay, has said, despite a poll that found a majority still favoured being part of the UK outside the EU.

The YouGov poll found there had been no real shift in opinion towards Scottish independence, with 53% saying they would vote for Scotland to remain in the UK and 47% that they would vote to separate....

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Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2016 5:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scots prefer post-Brexit UK to independence, poll finds

The poll's findings suggest that most Scots do not want another referendum on independence despite the EU vote
Chris Green Saturday July 30th 2016
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/politics/scots-want-stay-part-post -brexit-uk-poll-finds/

A clear majority of Scots want the country to stay part of a post-Brexit UK rather than becoming independent and remaining part of the EU, an opinion poll has found.

The results of the survey, carried out a month after the result of the European referendum, calls into question Scotland’s appetite for a re-run of 2014’s vote on independence.

“The arguments for Scotland remaining a part of the UK are just as compelling as they were in 2014 – in or out of the EU”

Lord Dunlop

The YouGov poll found that 46 per cent of Scots would prefer to remain part of a post-Brexit UK, while only 37 per cent favoured of breaking up the Union and being allowed to remain in the EU.


The results will be seen as a blow to the SNP’s hopes of securing independence for Scotland following the UK’s decision to leave the EU last month, which came despite 62 per cent of Scots voting to remain.

IndyRef2?

Nicola Sturgeon, the SNP leader, warned in the aftermath of the result that a second referendum on Scottish independence was now “highly likely” as voters would be furious at the prospect of being dragged out of the EU against their will.

The survey also found that the result of the EU vote has not had much of an impact on people’s opinions on independence, with a majority of people continuing to favour remaining part of the UK.

Only 47 per cent said they want Scotland to become an independent country, while 53 per cent want to keep the Union intact, the poll of more than 1,000 Scottish adults found.


The survey also showed that more Scots would rather be part of a post-Brexit UK with no access to the EU’s single market than leave the Union to secure continued free trade, with 40 per cent favouring the former scenario and only 34 per cent the latter.

“Inevitably, some will suggest that the high-water mark of Scottish independence has now passed, especially as it was thought that leaving the EU might persuade No voters to change their minds and vote against the Union,” said Joe Twyman, YouGov’s head of political and social research.

“However, the situation is, naturally, more complicated than that. There remains a great deal of uncertainty about what the UK’s relationship with the EU will look like…once precise details of Brexit are hammered out it could change the whole context of the independence debate.”

‘Divisive constitutional debate’

The Scottish Conservatives said the poll’s findings “completely exposes the SNP’s post-Brexit hyperbole” and called on Ms Sturgeon’s party to “get back to the day job, instead of agitating for yet another independence drive”.

Scotland Office Minister Lord Dunlop added that another “divisive constitutional debate” was not want the country wanted. “The arguments for Scotland remaining a part of the UK are just as compelling as they were in 2014 – in or out of the EU,” he said.

“The Prime Minister has been very clear that we are going to make a success of Brexit, and the focus now needs to be on collaborative working with the Scottish Government as ‘Team UK’ to ensure the best possible deal for Scotland and the rest of the UK.”

However, the SNP pointed out that support for independence had risen since YouGov’s last poll on the subject, suggesting that No voters were reconsidering their views in light of the UK’s decision to leave the EU.

“In light of the overwhelming vote to remain in the EU, it is right that the Scottish Government explores every option to protect our relationship with and place in the EU – including the option of another independence referendum if that is what it takes,” said SNP business convener Derek Mackay.

_________________
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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 10:36 am    Post subject: Socts independence, poll confusion Reply with quote

Quote:
A clear majority of Scots want the country to stay part of a post-Brexit UK rather than becoming independent and remaining part of the EU, an opinion poll has found.


The results of the survey, carried out a month after the result of the European referendum, calls into question Scotland’s appetite for a re-run of 2014’s vote on independence.


Seems that polls are all over the place:

Quote:
In a clear reflection of the growing backlash north of the Border to Thursday’s Brexit result, a ScotPulse online survey of 1,600 Scottish adults on Friday (24 June) showed that 59% of Scots now back leaving the UK.


http://www.scotsman.com/news/poll-puts-support-for-scottish-independen ce-at-59-1-4163338
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 01, 2016 4:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or fixed, bought, paid for?
_________________
--
'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2016 12:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John Pilger - Amazing Interview on Brexit & E.U. - Remainers Please Listen

Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=anht7KXQHBM

_________________
--
'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com
http://aanirfan.blogspot.com
Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2016 12:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Remain campaigners to dominate Theresa May’s new industrial strategy cabinet
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/remain-campaigners-to-do minate-may-s-new-industrial-strategy-cabinet-7167141.html

The committee will be one of the most powerful bodies in the new Government

Andy McSmith |
@andymcsmith |
Monday 1 August 2016|

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is one of a number of prominent Remain campaigners to secure a role on the new Committee on Economic and Industrial Strategy

Theresa May will be in Downing Street today presiding over a new Cabinet committee that she has created to drive forward her Government’s industrial strategy.

The Committee on Economic and Industrial Strategy will focus on achieving long-term improvements in industrial productivity and on encouraging innovations that will give the UK a competitive advantage.

The committee, which will be one of the most powerful bodies in the new Government, is heavily dominated by ministers who, like Ms May, backed the losing Remain campaign in the referendum.
Read more
May tells Lords ‘get behind Brexit’ after threat to derail Article 50

It will include the Chancellor Philip Hammond, the Business Secretary Greg Clark, the Work and Pensions Secretary Damian Green, the Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt, the Culture Secretary Karen Bradley, the Education Secretary Justine Greening, the Defence Secretary Michael Fallon and the Communities Secretary Sajid Javid – all of whom campaigned to stay in the EU.

They will be alongside three former Brexit campaigners – the Environment Secretary Andrea Leadsom, the International Trade Secretary Liam Fox and the Transport Secretary, Chris Grayling.

Speaking ahead of the Committee meeting, the Prime Minister said: “I will govern for the whole United Kingdom, and we will look to build an economy that works for everyone, not just the privileged few.

“That is why we need a proper industrial strategy that focuses on improving productivity, rewarding hard-working people with higher wages and creating more opportunities for young people so that, whatever their background, they go as far as their talents will take them. We also need a plan to drive growth up and down the country – from rural areas to our great cities.

“If we are to take advantages of the opportunities presented by Brexit, we need to have our whole economy firing. That’s why this Committee’s work is of the highest priority, and we will be getting down to work immediately.”

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2016 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a long list of Chairmen and Chief Executives that supported REMAIN
Interesting to see former Nazi companies, high finance, genetic engineering and many Bilderbergers. New World Order? Or just caught up in money-lust?
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/eu-referendum-brexit-l etter-remain-barclays-anglo-american-a7094811.html

Paul Bassett, Principal, A P Bassett Solicitors
Kerry Glazer, Chief Executive Officer, AAR
Matt Regan, UK General Manager, AbbVie
Mark Glatman, Chief Executive, Abstract Securities
Dr John Burt, Chief Executive Officer, Abzena
Dr Julian Gilbert, Chief Executive Officer, Acacia Pharma
Jonathan Biggs, Partner, Accel
Sonali De Rycker, Partner, Accel
Philippe Botteri, Partner, Accel
Harry Nelis, Partner, Accel
Fred Destin, Partner, Accel
Matt McLaren, Executive Director, Access Ambition Recruitment Services
Rolf Fyne, Founding Partner, Accordo Partners Ltd
Matt Southall, Managing Director, Acorn Recruitment Ltd
Chris Brady, CEO, Acro Aircraft Seating Ltd
Robin Bhattercherjee, General Manager, Actelion Pharmaceuticals UK
Lawrence Turner, Founder and MD, Active Online Marketing Group
David Barry, Managing Director, Acunim Software Ltd
James Murphy, Founder and CEO, Adam and Eve DDB
Mark Evans, Director, Adaptix
John Joyce*, Managing Partner, Addleshaw Goddard LLP
Charles Penney*, Senior Partner, Addleshaw Goddard LLP
Eric Van Der Klej, Co-Founder and CEO, Adeptra, Level39, Tech City UK, and Co-Founder Entiq
Kasper Rorsted, Designated CEO, Adidas
Andy Wood, CEO, Adnams plc
Adrian Marsh, Director, Adrian Marsh Ltd
Samantha Hale, Managing Director and Founder, Advanced Performance
Dr Sanjeev Kanoria, Chairman, Advinia Health Care Limited
Doug Monro, Co-Founder and CEO, Adzuna
Mike Adams, Managing Director, Agenda IT
Peter Hancock, President and Chief Executive Officer, AIG
Claire Burrows, Founder, Air and Grace
Tony Fernandes CBE, GCEO, AirAsia and Founder, Tune Group
Paul Kahn, President, EADS Airbus Group UK
Tim Parkinson, Chairman, Airedale Springs Ltd
Matt Pullen, Managing Director, AkzoNobel
Tom Walkinshaw, Founder/CEO, Alba Orbital Ltd
Jason Goodman, Founder, Albion
Dr David Mead, Director, Business Development, Albumedix
Teresa Tinsley, Director, Alcantara Communications
Klaus Kleinfeld, Chairman and CEO, Alcoa
Elizabeth Corley, Vice-Chair, Allianz Global Investors
Alexis Viswanathan, CEO, Alphabet Babies
Wesley Moody, Managing Director, Alphagraphic Inks
Michael Owen, Founder and Managing Director, Always Wear Red
Hermann Hauser, Director, Amadeus
Ahlya Fateh, Managing Director, Amanda Wakeley
Maurice Helfgott, Executive Chairman, Amery Capital
John Kearney, General Manager, UK & Ireland, Amgen
Sally Robinson, Owner, AmpleBosom.com
Lord Rana MBE, Managing Director, Andras House Ltd
Sir John Parker GBE, Chairman, Anglo American
Jacqueline Gold CBE, CEO, Ann Summers
Anya Hindmarch MBE, Founder, Anya Hindmarch
Stephen P. McGill CBE, Group President, Aon plc
Ross Bailey, Founder and CEO, Appear Here
Leah Hutcheon, CEO, Appointedd
David Harris, Managing Director, ArgoGlobal
Paul Green, Technical and Marketing Director, Arkessa
Peter Giørtz-Carlsen, Executive Vice President Europe, Arla Foods amba
Ajaya Sodha, Director, Arma Properties UK Ltd
Surinder Arora, Chairman, Arora Group
Martin Wardhaugh, Group Chief Executive, Arran Isle Limited
Jonas Almgren, CEO, Artfinder
Matthew Stibbe, CEO, Articulate Marketing
Greg Hodkinson, Chairman, Arup
Andy Clarke, CEO, ASDA

Bob Blake , Chairman, Ashe Construction Ltd
Ben Wynn, CEO & Founder, AskDAD Ltd
Brian McBride, Chairman, Asos.com and Wiggle.com
Janet Smith , Co-owner, Aspect
Chris O’Kane, Chief Executive Officer, Aspen Insurance Holdings Ltd
Dr Harren Jhoti, CEO & President, Astex Pharmaceuticals
Pascal Soriot, CEO, AstraZeneca
Ben Roome, CEO, at800
Glenn Cooper, President, ATG Access
Niall Wass, Formerly SVP UBER, EMEA and APAC, CEO Wonga, CCO Betfair, Now Entrepreneur In Residence, Atomico
Steve McQuillan, CEO, Avingtrans plc
Sir Adrian Montague CBE, Chairman, Aviva Insurance
Mark Wilson, CEO, Aviva Insurance

Andrea Slater, Group Vice President UK & W Europe, Avon Cosmetics
Chris Steel, Chairman, AVPE Ltd
Paul Evans, Group CEO, AXA UK & Ireland
Roger Morton, Director, Axion Polymers
Dave Knight, Managing Director, Axminster Carpets
Michael Kent, Founder and CEO, Azimo
Marta Krupinska, Co-Founder and GM, Azimo
Francesco Savignano, Director, Azzurri Hairstylists
Peter Rogers, CEO, Babcock International Group
Sir Roger Carr, Chairman, BAE Systems, vice-chairman BBC Trust
Julia Gash, Director, Bag It Don’t Bin It
Saghir Munir, Director, Baker & Coleman Solicitors
Leo Quinn, Group Chief Executive, Balfour Beatty plc
Alex Wilmot-Sitwell, President, EMEA, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
John McFarlane, Chairman, Barclays plc
David Thomas, Chief Executive, Barratt Homes
John Allan, Chairman, Barratt Homes

Bart Read, Owner, bartread.com Ltd
Richard John Carter, Managing Director UK & Ireland, BASF plc
Kurt Bock, Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors, BASF plc

Marcus Whittington, Director, Bath Boutique Stays
Ian Baxter, Chairman, Baxter Freight Limited
Dr Alexander Moscho, CEO, Bayer UK/Ireland
Christoph Weaver, General Manager, BayernLB
Christopher Baker-Brian, Co-Founder, BBOXX
Nikos Stathopoulos, Managing Partner, BC Partners
Silvestro de Besi, Managing Director, BDB Ltd
Albert Baladi, President International, Beam Suntory
Giles Brook, CEO - EMEA, Vita Coco
Arthur Hoffmann, Managing Director, Beaufort Underwriting Agency
Andrew Horton, Chief Executive Officer, Beazley
Stephen Sichak, Executive Vice President, Integrated Supply Chain, Becton Dickinson
Keith Knowles, Chief Executive Officer, Beds and Bars
Bella Freud, Creative Director, Bella Freud
Una Driscoll, Managing Director, Belt up Kidz Ltd
John Sherwen, Benchmark Scaffolding Ltd
Dr Holger Schmieding, Chief Economist, Berenberg
Richard Swart, Global Sales Director, Berger Group Europe
Rob Perrins, Managing Director, Berkeley Group plc
Tony Pidgley CBE, Chairman, Berkeley Group plc
Paul Berwin, Senior Partner, Berwins Solicitors
Edward Wray, Co-Founder, Betfair, Fintech investor
Andrew Mackenzie*, CEO, BHP Billiton
Stephen Greenhalgh, Managing Director, Biba Medical Ltd
Sir Michael Bibby, Managing Director, Bibby Line Group
Tim Ward, Managing Director, Bid and Research Development
Julio Taylor , Managing Director, Big Spring
Kenton Allen, Chief Executive Officer, Big Talk Productions
Arthur Kay , Founder and CEO, Bio-Bean Ltd
Dr Erik Miljan, Chief Executive Officer, Biodivide Ltd
Namdar Baghaei-Yazdi, Managing Director, Biotech Consultants Ltd
Nick Vardy , Director, Bison Beer Crafthouse
Helen Gibbons, Director, Bizlang Ltd
Daniel Benamran, General Manager UK, BlaBlaCar
Gerry Murphy, Chairman, Blackstone Europe
Emily Brooke, Founder and CEO, Blaze
Charlie Andrew, Managing Director, Bleiker’s Smokehouse Ltd
Ambarish Mitra, Founder and CEO, blippar
Michael Bloomberg KBE, Founder, Bloomberg News
Yoge Patel, CEO, Blue Bear System Research
Mike Turner, Managing Director, Bluebird Tea
Jane Whitton, Director, Blumont Pharma Ltd
Dr Ian Robertson, Board Member, BMW AG
Simon Bradley, Group Managing Director - Extrusion, BOAL UK Limited
Julian Granville, CEO, Boden
Ghislaine Boddington, Founder / Creative Director, BDS Creative Ltd, body>data>space, and Women Shift Digital
Paul Brown, Founder and CEO, Bol Foods
Sam Bompas, Director, Bompas & Parr Studio Ltd
Grace Bonner Wales, Director, Bonner Wales
Glenn Shoosmith, CEO, BookingBug
Phil Elliott, Managing Director, Booth Dispensers Ltd
Matt Dredger, CEO, Borroclub
Gill Jakes, Director, Bosworth Plastics
Steven Mendel, CEO, Bought By Many
Alasdair Pettigrew , CEO , Boxarr
Lord Browne of Madingley, Former CEO, BP plc
Bob Dudley, CEO, BP plc

Chris Holder, Director, Brand X PR
John Ayton, Chairman, Bremont Watch Company
Prof Brian Mark Evans, Director, Brian Mark Evans Urbanist
Chris Grigg, CEO, British Land
Simon Litherland*, CEO, Britvic plc
Bruce Flatt, Chief Executive Officer, Brookfield Asset Management Inc
Gwyn Jones , Director, Broughton Dairy
Sir Alan Parker, Chairman, Brunswick Group
Chris Oglesby, CEO, Bruntwood
Sir Mike Rake, Chairman, BT Group
Gavin Patterson, CEO, BT Group

Tony Buckingham, Managing Director, Buckingham Insurance Consultants
Adam Amor, Director, Buffoon Film and Media
Nigel Whittingham, Manufacturing Director, Bühler Sortex Ltd
Christopher Bailey MBE, CEO, Burberry
Sir John Peace, Chairman, Burberry Group and Standard Chartered
Jo Irons, Director, Bureau Direct
Alan Hibbert, Co-Founder, Buxton Pudding Company
Becky Downing, CEO, BuzzMove
Hussain Al Hilli, Co-Founder and COO, Byoot
Gavin Roberts, Managing Director, Caerbont Automotive Instruments Ltd
Elaine Pritchard, Director, Caittom Publishing
Julien Hammerson, Chief Executive Officer, Calastone
Joe Parry, Founder and CEO, Cambridge Intelligence
Sir George Iacobescu CBE, Chairman and CEO, Canary Wharf Group
Chris Geldard , UK Managing Partner, Capco
Sir Rodney Aldridge OBE, Founder, Capita
Roger Gewolb, Director, Car Loan Originations Limited
Philip Green, Chairman, Carillion plc
John Carley, Director, Carley’s Organics
Carolina Bucci, Founder, Carolina Bucci
Julie Brangstrup, Founder & CEO, Cash & Rocket
Daniel Sangiuseppe, Director, Castlewood Hotels
Mark Dorsett, Country Director, Caterpillar UK
Alex Mitchell, Founder, Causarma
Andrew Law, CEO and Chairman, Caxton Europe Asset Management
Subhash Thakrar, Partner, CBW Partners
John Whiteford, Transport Manager, CCI Transport
Gerard Versteegh, Chairman, CEG
Wim Souverijns, Vice President & General Manager, UK and Ireland, Celgene
Dr Will West, Executive Chairman, Cell Centric
Aidan Courtney, Chief Executive Officer, Censo Biologics Ltd

Iain Conn, Chief Executive, Centrica
Mike MacCana, Founder, CertSimple
Leonore Cervantes, Managing Director, Cervantes Ltd
Dr Edward Green, Chief Executive Officer, Chain Biotechnology Ltd
Richard Hales, Managing Director, Charles Peters
Rob O’Donovan, Co-Founder and CEO, CharlieHR
Charlotte Semler, Founder, Charlotte & Co
Sukhdev Mattu, CEO, Chartwell Private Hospital
Ian Stark, Chief Executive, Chemoxy International
Wil Benton, Co-Founder, Chew
Sarah Golding, Chief Executive Officer and Partner, CHI&PARTNERS London
Jonathan Newman, CEO, Chi Ventures Ltd
Tania Boler, Chief Executive Officer, Chiaro
Tom Delahoyde, Managing Director, Chiesi Ltd
Laurent Lacassagne, Chairman and CEO, Chivas Brothers Limited
Christopher Raeburn, Director, Christopher Raeburn
Christopher Shannon, Director, Christopher Shannon Menswear
Iain Anderson, Executive Chairman, Cicero Group
Rodolfo De Benedetti, Chairman, CIR
Marieke Flament, Managing Director Europe, Circle
Phil Smith, Chief Executive UK & Ireland, Cisco Systems
James C. Cowles, CEO for Europe, Middle East and Africa, Citi

Clive Watson, Chairman, City Pub Company plc
Sonny Leong CBE, Chief Executive, Civil Service College
Stephen Clarke, Partner/Director, CJCH Ltd
Paul Ashley MBE, Chairman, Clark Door Limited
Edwina Gieve, Founder and Director, Clary and Peg
Sudhir Dhanani, Director, Clearconsult Management Limited
Andrew Jervis, Founder and CEO, ClickMechanic
Peter George, Group Chief Executive, Clinigen Group plc
Simon Hudson, Founder and Director, Cloud2 Ltd
John Haywood, CEO, Clwyd Compounders Ltd
Penelope Warne, Senior Partner, CMS Cameron McKenna
Alison Baldwin, Managing Director, Coast Communications Ltd
Jason Kent, Managing Director, Cobble Van De Wiele Limited
Lord Bilimoria CBE DL*, Chairman, Cobra Beer Partnership
Janan Leo, Creative Director & Founder, Cocorose London Ltd
Steve Cowie, Director, Code Enigma
Susan Bowen, VP & General Manager EMEA, Cogeco Peer1
Miro Walker, Chief Executive Officer, Cognifide Limited
Andrew Manasseh, Managing Director, Communicating Europe
Rob Millar, Managing Director, Comotion Consulting Ltd
Paul Walsh*, Chairman, Compass Group
Ian Breminer, Managing Director, Complete Coffee Limited
Jeremy Clarke, Director, Computer Service Centre
Askar Sheibani, CEO, Comtek
Paul Bulloch, Managing Director, Concept Vehicle Leasing
Peter Brewin, Co-Founder, Concrete Canvas Ltd
William Crawford, Co-Founder, Concrete Canvas Ltd
Kevin Carrabine, Managing Director, Confidential Solutions Ltd
Sitar Teli, Managing Partner, Connect Ventures
Emma Taylor, Co-Founder, Consult Write
Alberto Linares, Continental Insurance Consultants
Troy Barratt, Managing Director, Contracts Engineering Ltd
Gideon Farrell, Co-Founder and CTO, Converge
Michael Haas, CEO, Coralfox Ltd
Oliver Bridge, CEO, Corner stone
Richard Andrews, Director, Corporate Instinct
Lord Davies of Abersoch CBE, Chairman, Corsair Capital
Ben Cottam, Managing Director, Cottam Brush Ltd
Simon Dutton, Director, CounterLine Ltd
Andrew Perry , Director, CounterLine Ltd
Tim Flood, Director, CounterLine Ltd
Sherry Coutu CBE, Serial entrepreneur
Madhava Turumella, CEO, Cove Venture Ltd
Martin Mackay, Director, Coverdrive Consulting
Peter Morris, Managing Director, Coveris Advanced Coatings (North Wales) Ltd
Sinead Koehler, Founder, Crafty Fox Market
Jagdish Nagrecha, Director, Crane International Limited
Richard Rose, Chairman, Crawshaw Group plc
Prof Geeta Nargund, Founder and CEO, CREATE Health Limited
Praful Nargund, Managing Director, CREATE Health Limited
Tidjane Thiam*, Chief Executive, Credit Suisse
Peter Pack, Chief Executive Officer, Crescendo Biologics Ltd
Dr Robert Scoffin, Chief Executive Officer, Cresset Biomolecular Discovery Limited
Stephen Stone, Chief Executive, Crest Nicholson
Eric Eichmann, CEO, Criteo
Robin Skailes, Director, Cropwell Bishop Creamery
Ben Knight, Founder, Croud Inc Ltd
Darren Westlake, CEO, Crowdcube
Peter Burke, Chartered Accountant, Cruse and Burke
Duncan Crutes, Owner, Crutes la Mar Limited
Craig Wilson, Regional General Manager, CSC
David Ripley, Managing Director, CSD Sealing Systems
Stephen Watson, Chief Executive, CTN Communications
Freddy Macnamara, Founder, Cuvva
David Matthews, Director, Cyberdine Security
Stuart Laidlaw, CEO, CyberLytic
Anthony Lau, Managing Director, Cyclehoop Ltd
Daniela Menzky, COO, CyNation
Daisy White, CEO, Daisy White’s Booktique
Paul Dimond, Deputy Chairman, DAKS Simpson Group plc
David Harper, Director, David Harper & Co
Haakon Overli, General Partner, Dawn Capital
Josh Bell, Partner, Dawn Capital
Davinder Bal, Chairman, DBS Law
Keir Whiteside, Sales Director, DC Associates
Debbie Bryan, Director, Debbie Bryan
Kathryn Parsons*, Chief Executive Officer, Decoded
Ed Salt, Managing Director, Delamere Dairy
David Sproul, Senior Partner and CEO, Deloitte UK
JP Agrawal, Managing Director and Founder, Derivatives Value Advisors
Cathy Owens, Director, Deryn Consulting Limited
Timotheus Höttges, Chief Executive Officer, Deutsche Telekom
Ivan Menezes, CEO, Diageo
Albert Sarpong, Director, Dial Square Project Management Limited
Peter Callahan, Director, Diamond Dispersions Ltd
Nick Denning, CEO, Diegesis
Julian Ranger, Founder and Executive Chairman, digi.me
Dr Andrew Black, Chief Executive, Digit Ltd
Justin Jackson, Director, Digital Remit
Alastair Paterson, Co-Founder and CEO, Digital Shadows
James Chappell, Co-Founder and CTO, Digital Shadows

Luke Taylor, Global Chief Executive Officer, DigitasLBi
David Williams, Chief Executive Officer, Discuva Ltd
Seb James*, CEO, Dixons Carphone
Sir Charles Dunstone CVO*, Chairman, Dixons Carphone & TalkTalk
Sumit Agarwal, Founder & Managing Partner, DNS Associates Ltd
Dr Eddy Littler, Chief Executive Officer, Domainex
Rumi Verjee, Founder, Domino’s Pizza UK
Chris Morling, Founder and Managing Director, Dot Zinc
Baroness Lane-Fox of Soho CBE, Co-Founder, Doteveryone and Lastminute.com
Joyce de Haas, Managing Director, Double Dutch Ltd
Helen Dickson, Director, Dress Place
Ernesto Schmitt, CEO and Co-Founder, Drivetribe
Felix Leuschner, CEO and Founder, Drover Ltd
Damian Kimmelman, CEO and Co-founder, DueDil
Justin Fitzpatrick, COO and Co-founder, DueDil
Ram Gidoomal CBE, Chairman, Dulas Ltd
Paul Edwards, Managing Director, Dunbia Ltd
Derek Smith, Head of UK Operations, Dundee Capital Markets
Lewis Dunn, Managing Director, Dunn’s Bakery
Richard Bradley, Finance Director, Dyer Engineering Ltd
Graeme Parkins, Managing Director, Dyer Engineering Ltd
Adrian Ericsson, Director, Dynamo Analytics
Dr Johannes Teyssen, Chairman and CEO, E.ON
Dr Abel Ureta-Vidal, Chief Executive Officer, Eagle Genomics Ltd
Alejandro Litovsky, Founder and CEO, Earth Security Group
Carolyn McCall DBE, CEO, EasyJet
Rahul Parekh, Co-Founder and CEO, EatFirst
Dinesh Dhamija, President, TIE
Founder, ebookers.com
Julian Carter, Founding Partner & Managing Director, EC1 Capital Ltd
David A Edwards, Managing Director, Edge Group
Ian Livingstone CBE, Co-founder Games Workshop, Chairman Sumo Digital, Playdemic and Midoki
Nick Burgin, President & COO EMEA, Eisai Europe Ltd
Raj Bhatt, Vice Chairman & CEO, Elara Capital plc
Thomas Lawes, Managing Director, Electric Cinema Birmingham
Lindsley Ruth, CEO, Electrocomponents plc
Paul Lindley, Founder and Chairman, Ella’s Kitchen
Adam Joyce, Founder and Chief Scientist, Elliptic
Ian Malcolm, Managing Director, Elring Klinger (GB) Ltd
Dr Jeremy Bennett, CEO, Embecosm
Mark Gilbert, Managing Director, Emerald Trading Waste Solutions
Emilio De La Morena, Director, Emilio De La Morena
Emmeline Pidgen, Director, Emmeline Illustration
James Greenham, Managing Director, EMS Physio Ltd
Liz Weatherill, Managing Director, Enable 2 CIC
Dr Mike Ashmead, Managing Director, Encocam Ltd
James King , Founder and CTO, Encore
Kate Wilde, Managing Director, Engage with Business
Gérard Mestrallet, Chairman and CEO, ENGIE
Kate Shand, Managing Director, Enjoy Education
Amjad Bseisu, CEO, Enquest
Chris Perry, Managing Director, Entec Industries Ltd
Alice Bentinck, Co-Founder, Entrepreneur First
Matt Clifford, Co-Founder, Entrepreneur First
Brian Cass, Chief Executive, Envigo
Eric Van der Horst, Director, EOS Cycling Holidays Ltd
Andrew Cleaton, Director, Epiphany Music
Chris Cowls, Chief Executive, E-productive
Erdem Moralioglu, Creative Director, Erdem
Patrick O’Sullivan*, Chair, ERS Ltd
Dom Jackman, Co-Founder, Escape the City
Esin Akan, Director, Esin Akan Ltd
Damian Croft, Managing Director, Esplora
Charlie Shaw, Managing Director, Esteiro Business Solutions
Nikolay Mitev, Founder, EU Network Ltd
Philip Sheldrake, Managing Partner, Euler Partners
Derek Wood, Managing Director, Euro Culture International Cultural Services
Surjit Jutla, Director, Euro-Link Property Management Services Ltd
Mark Dodsworth, Managing Director, Europartnerships
Nicolas Petrovic, CEO, Eurostar
Andrew Blenkiron, Estate Director, Euston Estate
Adam Shuter, Managing Director, Exact Logistics
Richard Corbett, CEO, Eyetease Limited
Greg Bliss, Director, F I Bliss Ltd
José Neves, Founder, Farfetch
Stephen Browett, Chairman, Farr Vintners
Faye Toogood, Designer, Faye Toogood
Malcolm Durham, Founder, FD Solutions
Frederic Court, Founder & Managing Partner, Felix Cap
Dr Chris Emslie, CEO, Fibercore Limited
Richard Brindle, Group Chief Executive, Fidelis Insurance
Michael Chissick, Managing Partner, Fieldfisher LLP
Aleksandra Polanksa, Managing Director, Finno Medical Ltd
Roland Rudd, Chairman, Finsbury
Simon Hay, Founder, Firefly
Andy Mead, CEO, Firefly Solar Generators Limited
Sarah Jane Thomson, Founder, First News
Gurvinder Sethi, Director, Flavors of India Ltd
Tom Elek, Chairman, Flawless Media
Graham James, Director, Flexcrete Technologies Ltd
Justin Anderson, CEO, Flexeye Group
Dr Tim Willis, CEO, Flexpansion Ltd
Frankie Fox, Co-Founder, Foraging Fox
Max Hunt, Proprietor, Force Ten Productions
James Farley, Executive Vice President and President, Europe, Ford
Geoff Ford, Chairman, Ford Engineering Group Ltd
Dr Ravi Mehrotra CBE, Executive Chairman, Foresight Ltd
Steve Brown, Founder, Forest Hydraulics Ltd
Jilly Greed, Partner, Fortescue Farming
Paul Adamson, Chairman, Forum Europe
Brent Hoberman CBE, Co-Founder, Founders Factory, lastminute.com, Made.com, Founders.Forum
Henry Lane Fox , Partner, Founders Forum
Co-founder and CEO, Founders Factory
Nacho Morais, Director, Frank Consulting
Ed Molyneux, Founder and CEO, FreeAgent
Faye Dicker, Founder, Freelance Mum
Ben Richardson, Director, FreestyleXtreme
Sharon Kaur, Director and Founder, Freida’s Pantry Ltd
John Davies*, Partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP
Vannessa Valdez, Founder, Fruveju Limited
Gareth M Jenkins, Managing Director, FSG Tool & Die Ltd
John Haurum, Chief Executive Officer, F-star
Michael Keegan, Executive Director, EMEIA, Fujitsu
Phillipe Avery, Director, Future Point 4 Business Limited
Rebecca Warden, Business Development Manager, FW Solutions Ltd
Daniel Webber, Co-Founder and Managing Director, FXcompared.com
Fyodor Podgorny, Director, Fyodor Golan
Golan Frydman, Director, Fyodor Golan
Ed French, CEO, GameSessions
David Stitt, Managing Director, Gap 360
James Gardiner, CEO, Gardiner & Bros Footsure
Harry Cotterell OBE, Partner, Garnons Estate
David Garfield, CEO and Co-Founder, Garrison Technology
Henry Harrison, CTO and Co-Founder, Garrison Technology
Stewart Wingate, Chief Executive Officer, Gatwick Airport
Mark Bullen, Managing Director, GB Electronics (UK) Ltd
Kieran Murphy, Chief Executive Officer, GE Healthcare UK Ltd

Alison Wright, Managing Director, Gear For Girls
Lara Findlay, Founder and Director, Geared App
Josh Carson, Founder and Director, Geared App
Andrzej Schmidt, Founder and Director, Geared App
Will Gemmill , Partner, Gemmill Brothers LLP
Mark Elborne, UK CEO, General Electric
Richard Dennys, CEO & Co-Founder, Generate Learning & Skills Limited
Ashok Rabheru CVO DL, Chairman, Genisys Group
Keith Hollinrake, CEO, Get Busy Living
Dr Remo Gerber, Managing Director Western Europe, Gett UK Ltd
Matthew Lowe , Managing Director, Giacomini UK
Harminder Gill, Managing Director, Gillcrest Homes
Bruce Martin, Managing Director, Ginger Juice Ltd
Nigel Stein, Chief Executive, GKN
Chris Ward , Director and Senior Developer, Gladward
Joshua Gladwin, Director, Gladward
Bill Wilson, Managing Director, Glenmore Outdoor Ltd
Dr Mark Carnegie-Brown, Chief Executive Officer, Glide Pharmaceutical Technologies Ltd
Uday Dholakia OBE, Senior Partner, Global Consulting UK Ltd
Dan Mailly, Managing Director, Global Support Services
Laura Gelder-Robertson, Director, Glow Innovation
Dr David Simpson, Chief Executive Officer, Glythera Ltd
Guy Nixon, Founder and CEO, Go Native
Hiroki Takeuchi, CEO and Co-Founder, GoCardless
Ravi Gidar, Director, Gold Care Homes
Nicolas De Santis, Entrepreneur, Opodo.com
Gold Mercury Int
Richard Gnodde, Co-CEO, Goldman Sachs International
Michael Sherwood, Co-CEO, Goldman Sachs International

Gregory McDonald, Group Managing Director, Goodfish Group
Ryan Davies, Managing Director, Gospelware
Joel Freeman, CEO, Grabble
Graham Bishop, Consultant, Grahambishop.com
Tony Matharu*, Managing Director, Grange Hotels
Peter Robinson, Director, Granville Food Care
John Robinson, Director, Granville Food Care
Stan Abbott, CEO, Gravity Consulting Ltd
Hilaire Agnama, Owner, Great Zeal Ltd
Sean Sutcliffe, Chief Executive Officer, Green Biologics Ltd
Rooney Anand, CEO, Greene King
Jordan Daykin, Managing Director, GripIt Fixings
Hugh D Facey MBE, Chairman, Gripple Ltd & Loadhog Ltd
David Walters, Managing Director, Grosvenor International Partners
Leon Blitz, Managing Partner, Grovepoint Capital LLP
Aftab Malhotra, Managing Director, Growth Enabler Global
Olivia Sibony, Co-Founder, Grub Club
Dr Jan-Uwe Claas, General Manager UK, Grunenthal Ltd
John Shropshire , Chairman, G’s Fresh
Sir Andrew Witty, CEO, GSK
Renato Luchessi, Managing Director, Hair at the Edge
Eden Warren, Director, Halcyan
Alison Lea-Wilson, Director, Halen Môn
David Lea-Wilson, Director, Halen Môn
Mark Holdsworth, Founder, HALF HITCH Gin
Jenny Halpern Prince, CEO, Halpern
David Atkins, CEO, Hammerson plc
David Tyler, Chairman, Hammerson plc
Stuart Roberts , Director, Hammonds End Farm
Dan Craft, Partner, Handlebar Barista
David Williams, Managing Director, Happus
Paul Stock, Solicitor, Harold Stock and co
Tom Worth, Owner, Hartsworth Ltd
Sam James, Managing Director, Hassle.com
Tim Eggar , Chairman, Haulfryn Group Ltd
Chris Hirst, CEO, Havas Worldwide Europe
Maria Whitehead MBE, Director, Hawkshead Relish Company Ltd
Sue Hawkins, Hawksmoor Principal, Hawksmoor Hydrotherapy Referral Centre
Fleur Record-Smith, Managing Director, Hayne Barn Leisure Ltd
Raj Gupta, Director, Heathfield House Nursing Homes Ltd
John Holland-Kaye, CEO, Heathrow
Richard Sunderland, Executive Chairman, Heavenly
Helen Lawrence, Director, Helen Lawrence
Matthias Meyer, Managing Director, Heller Machine Tools Ltd
Andrew Formica, CEO, Henderson Group plc
Dr Malcolm Weir, Founder, Director and Chief Executive Officer, Heptares Therapeutics Ltd
Ken White, Managing Director, Herald and Heart
Richard Herbert, Chairman, Herbert Group Ltd
Manish Tiwari, Managing Director, Here&Now365 Ltd
Chris Heseltine, Owner, Hesketh Farm Park
Steve Munn, Managing Director, Hevasure
Martin Hiscox, Chief Executive, Hiscox Venture
Hiroaki Nakanishi, Chairman, Hitachi
Simon Allison, Chairman and CEO, Hoftel
Allen Hogan , Managing Director, Hogan’s Cider Limited
Jenny Taylor , Creative Director, Hokolo
Lauren Holden, Copywriter
Dr Javid Khan, Managing Director, Holoxica Ltd
Arif Hussein, Director, Homebound UK Ltd (t/a Brockley Consulting)
Richard Harpin, Founder and Chief Executive, HomeServe Plc
Andrea Rodney, Director, Hone-All Precision Ltd
Amit Bhatia, Chairman, Hope Construction Materials Ltd
James Hopkins, Executive Chairman, Hopkins Homes Ltd
Michael Cox, Managing Director, Hopkins Homes Ltd
Dr Darrin Disley, Chief Executive Officer and President, Horizon Discovery Ltd
Jalal Al-Yawer, CEO, Hotel Xanadu Limited
Henry Holland, Creative Director, House of Holland
Bob O’Connor*, Managing Director, Howletts and Port Lympne
Hussein Kanji, Founding Partner, Hoxton Ventures
Richard Lowe, Managing Director, HR & Training Solutions Ltd
Douglas Flint CBE, Chairman, HSBC
Stuart Gulliver, CEO, HSBC

Andrew McLoughlin, Founder, Huddle
Partner, SoftTech VC
David Brownlow, Founder, Huntswood
Gregg Heller, Managing Director, HUSCO International Partners LLP
Christian Salbaing, Deputy Chairman, Hutchison Whampoa
Stephen McGlennan, CEO, Hybrid Air Vehicles Ltd
Wayne Preece, CEO, Hydro Industries
Julian Smith, Director, I Am Enterprises
Mike Younger, Finance Director, Ian Macleod Distillers Ltd
Ignacio S. Galán, Chairman and CEO, Iberdrola
David Stokes, CEO, IBM UK
Tristan Cowell, Managing Director, IC Innovations
Shamir Shah, Director, Icone-International Ltd
Jose Marin, Founder, FJ Labs
Dan Hydes, Managing Director, Ignite Data Ltd
Pratik Sampat, CEO, Ihorizon
Björn Savén, CEO, IK Investment Partners Ltd
Dr Kevin Cox, Chief Executive Officer, Imanova Ltd
Imogen Belfield, Creative Director, Imogen Belfield
Carley Centen, Founder & Director, ImpactMetrics
Alison Cooper, CEO, Imperial Brands plc
Isobel Carter, Managing Director, Incarter International
Rishi Chowdhury, Co-Founder, IncuBus Ventures
Cheryl Westerman, Director, Independent Content Services Ltd
Ray Johnson , Proprietor, Independent Insurance Services
Alex Depledge, Entrepreneur in Residence, Index Ventures
Jan Hammer, Partner, Index Ventures
Martin Mignot, Partner, Index Ventures
Amarjit Singh, CEO, India Business Consultancy Limited (t/a The India Business Group)
Manoj Ladwa, Chief Executive, India Inc Ltd
Omar Hassan , Chief Excecutive Officer, Inevert
Elizabeth Vega, Chief Executive Officer, Informed Solutions
Nicola Hall, Managing Director, Ingenica Solutions
Rupert Pearce*, CEO, Inmarsat
Richard Reed CBE, Co-Founder, Innocent and Jam Jar Investments
Alastair Lukies CBE, Chairman, Innovate Finance
John Gunn, Chief Executive, Insiprit Energy plc and Octagonal plc
Paul Kaye, Managing Director, IntelliQA Limited
Ross Reed, Director, Interfrigo
Stephen Lumsden , Managing Director, Intermusica
Don Dennis , Director, International Flower Essence Repertoire
Lord Aldington, Director, Intramuros
Graham Stevenson, Managing Director, Inver House Distillers Limited
Helen James, CEO, Investis
Jacob Wallenberg, Chairman, Investor AB
Mike Lynch OBE, Invoke Capital
Erika Baker, Director, Iolante
Dr John McCafferty, Chief Executive Officer, IONTAS
Tobias Alpsten, CEO, iPlato Healthcare
Isabelle Ugochukwu, Founder & Creative Director, Isabella Queen
Jen Munro*, CEO, ISSOS
Archie Norman, Former Chairman, ITV
Oojal Jhutti, Founder and CEO, IWaz.at
Christoph Rieche, CEO, iwoca
Derek Hill, CEO, ixico
Aled Griffiths OBE, Managing Partner, J A & O Griffiths and Sons
Peter Williams, Founder and CEO, Jack Wills
Ralph Speth KBE, CEO, Jaguar Land Rover
Peter Davies, Chief Executive, James Lister & Sons Limited
Lawrence Mallinson, Owner and Managing Director, James White Drinks Ltd
Alexander Asseily, Founder of Jawbone, State, and Chiaro
Richard Little , Managing Director, Jenton International Limited
Jimmy Cregan, Managing Director, Jimmy’s Iced Coffee Ltd
Kevan Carrick, Partner, JK Property Consultants LLP
Jo Malone MBE, Founder, Jo Loves
Stephen Morris, Joint Managing Director, John Liscombe Ltd
Laura Tenison, Founder and Managing Director, JoJo Maman Bébé
Jane Field, Owner/Founder, Jonny’s Sister
David Newman , Director, Jordanglia Ltd
Richard Joseph, Founder, Joseph Joseph Ltd
Daniel Pinto, CEO of Corporate and Investment Bank, and CEO of EMEA, J P Morgan
Steven Daniels, Director, Just Right Products UK & Europe Ltd
Alex Klein, Cofounder & CEO, Kano
Simon Keeping, Region President, Kärcher
Erika Brodnock, Founder, Karisma Kidz
Dr Simon Kerry, Chief Executive Officer, Karus Therapeutics Ltd
Katharine Pooley, Chief Executive and Owner, Katharine Pooley Interior Design
Katie Jones, Director, Katie Jones Knitwear
David Mitchell, Managing Director, Katmex Limited
Terrye Teverson, Managing Director, KCS Trade Print
Kelly Hoppen MBE*, Director, Kelly Hoppen Interiors
John Wood, Chairman, Kesslers International Limited
Rajay Naik, Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Keypath Education
Tim Hill, Co-Founder and Director, Keyzapp
Ken Davies, Owner, KGD Industrial
Mani Kohli, Founder/Designer, Khubsoorat UK Ltd (t/a Khubsoorat Collection)
Anthony Wills, Managing Director, Kilchoman Distillery
Stephen Kon, Senior Partner, King & Wood Mallesons EUME
Veronique Laury, CEO, Kingfisher
David Christensen, Director, Kingston Hill Farm Ltd
Kit Neale, Director, Kit Neale
Johannes Huth, Head of KKR EMEA
Sid Khemka, Founder & CEO, Konnect Digital Limited
Neil Clifford, Chief Executive, Kurt Geiger
Becky Sebright-King, Director, Lady Bakewell-Park
Heiner Boehmer, General Manager, London, Landesbank Hessen-Thuringen
Omar Moulani, COO, Landmax.pro
Karl Hick, CEO, Larkfleet Ltd
Chris Hill, Director, Latitude Wine Ltd
Ken Muschamp, Director, Laulind Ltd
Ian Walker, Director, LaundryRepublic
David Law, Managing Director, Law Distribution
Luke Ferris, CEO, laZook
Stuart Gibbons, Managing & Marketing Director, Le Mark Group
Wesley Hartley, Head of Social Engagement and Curation Strategy, Leaf.fm
Sir Terry Leahy, former Tesco boss
Sonia Yeshin, Director, Leaman Mattei
Mitchel White, Managing Director, Left Media
Geraldine Murphy, Managing Director, Leo Pharma UK/IE
Julian Horn-Smith, Advisory Board Member, LetterOne Technology
Pravin Shah, Director, Levershire Limited
Liam Hodges, Director, Liam Hodges
Mike Fries, CEO, Liberty Global
Owain Williams, Co-Founder, Lick Yogurt
Sabrina Allison, Director, Light on the Path Ltd
Pierpaolo Bastiani, Founder and Director, Limone Events
Robert Elliott*, Chairman and Senior Partner, Linklaters LLP
Andrew Williams, Partner, Chief Executive Officer, LJ Partnership
John Nelson, Chairman, Lloyd’s of London
Robin Klein, Co-Founder, LocalGlobe
Mike Hammond, Chairman, Lockton International Holdings Limited & Lockton Overseas Limited
R.D. Churchill, Managing Director, Lohmann Technologies UK Ltd
Chris Parker, Managing Director, London & Scottish International
Gavan Conlon, Partner, London Economics
Prem Chander, CEO, London Energy Trading Ltd
Anna MacDonald, Co-Director, London Film Academy
Daisy Gili, Co-Director, London Film Academy
Angela Spang, Founder and Owner, London Medical Education Academy
Xavier Rolet KBE, CEO, London Stock Exchange

David Pexton, Chief Executive, Lonmar Global Risks
Matthew Blakemore , CEO, Looks Good On Me Limited
Lorna Syson, Textile Designer, Lorna Syson
Lou Dalton, Director, Lou Dalton
Rebecca Christensen, Founder, Love From Indie Street
Martha Keith, Founder and Director, Love Give Ink
Tim Bowman, Commercial Director, Love Local Jobs
Debbie Wosskow, CEO, Love Home Swap
Chair, Sharing Economy UK
Sally Low, Managing Director , Low Associates Ltd
Touker Suleyman, Founder, Low Profile Group , Hawes &Curtis, Ghost, Huxley and Cox
Christian Schindler*, Regional Director, UK, Ireland and Iceland, Lufthansa
Luke Irwin, Founder, Luke Irwin
Alexandra Chong, Founder, Lulu
Pascal Auberson, Founder, Lumacode Ltd
Tim Allen, Managing Director, M J Allen Group Ltd
George Wright, Managing Director, M Wright & Sons Ltd
Jess Burley, Global Chief Executive, m/Six Agency
Ellie MacDonald, Managing Director, MacComms Ltd
Mark Reynolds, Chief Executive, Mace Group
Audrey Macnaughton, Managing Director, Macnaughton McGregor Ltd
Ning Li, Co-Founder and CEO, Made.com
Davinder Bains, Managing Director, Magal Cables Ltd
Gamil Magal, CEO, Magal Engineering LTD
Dave Thompson, Founder and CEO, Magictab
Kaan Aydogmus , Creative Director, Magnetic
Matthew Scales, Managing Director, Magnus Marine Ltd
Vince Vas, Sole Director/Proprietor, Maid Time Ltd
Evgeny Shadchnev, Founder and CEO, Makers Academy
Ian Coll, Founder and Managing Director, Mamuska Restaurants LTD
Charlie Cornish, Chief Executive, Manchester Airports Group
Nimesh Sanghrajka, Director & Co-Founder, Mantra Consultancy & Capital Limited
Martin Lamb, Director, Maple Consulting Ltd
Pam Cain, Director, MarchantCain Design Ltd
Mark Baines, Managing Director, Marcom (Marketing Communications) Ltd
Steve Morgan, Managing Director, Marden Communications
Marianne Lumb, Head Chef & Owner, Marianne Restaurant
Chris Peer, Managing Director, Maritime House
Kevin Spencer , Group CEO, Markerstudy
Marc Bolland, Former CEO, Marks and Spencer
Andrew Wilmot, CEO, Maroon Elephant
Marta Marques, Director, Marques ’ Almeida
Paulo Almeida, Director, Marques ’ Almeida
Blas Maquivar, President, Mars Chocolate UK
Chris Smith, Managing Director, Marshfield Bakery
Mary Katrantzou, Founder and Creative Director, Mary Katrantzou
Rick Haythornthwaite, Chairman, Mastercard
Charlie Bradshaw, CEO, Matrix APA
Rosanna Falconer, Business Director, Matthew Williamson
Chris Nobbs, Director of Strategic Partnerships, MBJ LONDON
Ron Dennis CBE, Chairman and CEO, McLaren Technology Group
Nigel Barton, Chairman, Me.com
Clare Hornby, Founder and Creative Director, ME+EM
Karen Blackett OBE*, Chairwoman, MediaCom UK
Dr Jane Osbourn, Vice President R&D, MedImmune UK
Dr Anthony Lockett, Founder & CEO, MEDQP
Sir Nigel Rudd*, Chairman, Meggitt
James Mitchell , Managing Director, Mell Properties Limited
Philip Alexander, Founder, Mentorial
Søren Bo Christiansen, President MSD Europe & Canada Human Health, Merck Sharp & Dohme Ltd
Jay Tahasildar, Director, Mercurius IT Limited
Tom Adeyoola, CEO and Founder, Metail
Stuart Fell, Chair, Metal Assemblies Ltd, Bodill Parker Ltd
Andrew Hartshorn, Managing Director, Methods Advisory Limited
Baroness Mone OBE, Founder, MGM Media
Guy Poskitt, Managing Director, MH Poskitt Limited
Vish Mehta, Group Director, MiCasa Group
Byron Dixon, Chief Executive Officer, Micro-Fresh International
Liz Rice, Co-Founder and CEO, Microscaling Systems
Linda Middleton-Jones, Director, Middleton Jones
Dr Philip Munn, Managing Director, Midland Corrosion Services
Simon Grantham, Managing Director, Miele GB
Glenn Channon, Co-Founder, milkmanenergy.com
Rupa Ganatra, Founding Partner, Millennial 20/20 Ltd
Mike Ottolangui, Managing Director, Milltech Precision Engineering Ltd
Michael Acton Smith , Founder and Chairman, Mind Candy
Octavius Black, CEO, Mind Gym
Linda Papadopoulos, Director, Mindwork Consulting
Chris Ormrod, Managing Director, Ministry of Cake
Nadeem Raza, CEO, Mircrolise
Rosie Ginday, Managing Director, Miss Macaroon
Dr Anker Lundemose, Chief Executive Officer, Mission Therapeutics Ltd
Roger Bramble, Chairman, Mithras Underwriting Ltd
Nikhil Shah, Co-founder, Mixcloud
Luke Benton, Managing Director, MNB Precision Ltd
Winston Hoyte, Managing Director, MOA Clothing
Kanya King MBE, CEO and Founder, MOBO Organisations Ltd
Zsolt Hernádi, Chairman and CEO, MOL
Clayton Harding, Managing Director, Möllertech Ltd
Molly Goddard, Director/Designer, Molly Goddard
Tom Mercer, Founder and MD, MOMA Foods
Adrian Munn, Director of Sales and marketing, Monochrome Ltd
Rana Harvey , Managing Director, Monster Group (UK) Limited
Wendy Tan-White MBE, Co-Founder, Moonfruit
Rekha Mehr, Founder and Managing Director, moonrekha
Jenny Moloney, Founder and Director, Moral Fibre Food Ltd
Laura Koskenmäki, Managing Director, Morgan Chex Commercial Finance Limited
Gerald Fitzgerald, Global Chief Operating Officer, Morgan McKinley
Robert Rooney, Chief Executive Officer, Morgan Stanley International
Fraser Smeaton, CEO, MorphCostumes
Toby Coppel, Co-Founder and Partner, Mosaic Ventures
Karl Jones , Managing Director, Moshimo
Amy Powney, Creative Director, Mother of Pearl
Alan Parker CBE*, Chairman, Mothercare plc and Parkdean Resorts Ltd
Gary Landesberg, Managing Director, Mountain Capital
Brynne K. Herbert, Founder & CEO, MOVE Guides
Tamara Lohan MBE, Founder and CTO, Mr & Mrs Smith
Kuldip Singh Sahota, Managing Director, Mr Singh’s Sauce
Dale Murray CBE
Victoria Arnold, CEO, MuscleCake
Kevin Cornils, CEO, MyOptique Group
Annie Martin, Founder and Director, Nannies Incorporated
Dr Andreas Schatzlein, Chief Executive Officer, Nanomerics
Dean Finch, CEO, National Express Group
Steve Holliday*, Executive Director, National Grid

Ashley Prime, Managing Director, Navigator Ltd
Edward Naylor, CEO, Naylor Industries plc
Rob Cotton, CEO, NCC Group plc
Ketan Mehta, Managing Director, Necessity Supplies Ltd
Rose Yombo-Djema, CEO & Founder, Neema Food Ltd
Mary Nelson, Director, Nelson Browne Management Ltd
Sam Laidlaw, Chairman, Neptune Oil and Gas
Arnaud Massenet, Founder and Director, Net-a-Porter Group
CEO and Director, de-pury Group
Mark Sebba, Former Chief Executive, The Net-a-Porter Group
Nic Wistreich, Co-Founder, Netribution
Director, HelloIdeas.com
Dominic Adams, Managing Director, Network Design & Marketing
Sarah Willingham, Co-Founder, Neutrahealth
Ed Dean, Co-Founder, Minerva & co
Steve Wisbey, Managing Director, NIC Instruments LTD
Nicholas Kirkwood, Creative Director, Nicholas Kirkwood
Nick Starling, Consultant, Nick Starling Consultancy Limited
Chloe Tingle, Founder and Director, No More Taboo
Risto Siilasmaa, Chairman, Nokia
Jason Scott, CEO, NonInvasives International limited
Miisa Mink, Chairman & Co-owner, Nordic Bakery Ltd
Rosey Dunn, Partner, North Carlton Farm
Alan Toverell, Chairman, North West Energy Squared
Ian Richards, Director, NorthStar Ventures
Patrick Grant, Owner & Creative Director, Norton & Sons & E. Tautz
Stuart Garner, CEO, Norton Motorcycles (UK) Ltd
Geeta Sidhu-Robb , CEO and Founder, Nosh Detox Delivery Ltd
Jos White, Partner, Notion Capital
Co-Founder, MessageLabs and Star
Linda Walker, Managing Director, Nottingham Language Academy
Candide Kirk, Founder, Novellic
Stefano Marrone, Managing Director, Nucco Brain Studio Limited
Jenny Goss, Director, O’LearyGoss Architects
David Fitzsimons, Managing Director, Oakdene Hollins Ltd
Lord Rose, Chair, Ocado and Fat Face
Tim Steiner, CEO, Ocado Group

Raluca Micu, Owner, October 26th Atelier LTD
Alex Macpherson, Co-Founder, Octopus Ventures
Joanna Tall, Solicitor, Off to see my lawyer
Guy Jeremiah, Managing Director, OHYO
Bruce Hemphill, CEO, Old Mutual Group
Bob Gorton, Managing Director, Old St Andrews Limited
Sally Greene OBE, Businesswoman in Entertainment
Damon Oldcorn, Managing Partner, Oldcorn and Oldcorn LLP, Founder, PhoneMe
Sul Sahota, Chairman, Oleo International
Sir Richard Olver KBE
Damini Sharma, Managing Director, OM Safety Solutions Ltd
Alistair Hill, Co-Founder and CEO, On Device Research
Greg Marsh, Co-Founder and CEO, onefinestay
Husayn Kassai, Co-Founder and CEO, Onfido
Kieran Kunhya, Founder, Open Broadcast Systems
Colin Cram, Chair/Chief Executive, Open Forum Events Ltd
Mike O’Brien, CEO, Opencast Software Europe Ltd
Richard Beldam , Chairman, Openfield Group Limited
Christina Richardson, Director, Openr
Brendan Gill, CEO, OpenSignal
Charlie Thuillier, Managing Director, Oppo Ice Cream
Stéphane Richard, Chairman and CEO, Orange
Chris Hutton-Penman, Chairman, Original Steel Services Ltd
Dr Dale Athey, Chief Executive Officer, Orla Protein Technologies Ltd
Martin Campbell , Managing Director, Ormsby Street Ltd
Pia Marocco, Managing Director, Osborne & Partners
Nadia Latif, Co-Director, Our House of Spice Ltd
Julia Latif, Co-Director, Our House of Spice Ltd
Luke Brynley-Jones, Managing Director, Our Social Times
Chris Edson, Founder, OurPath
Andrew Moon, Director, Outside View Ltd
Dr Colin Story, CEO, OxSonics
James Hook , Managing Director, P.D. Hook Group
David Maclean, Managing Director, Packt Publishing
Matthew Palmer, Director, palmer//harding Ltd
Tony Attard, Group Chief Executive , Panaz Holdings
Josephine McKeon , Manager, Pantiles Chambers Ltd
Francois Souyri, Company Director, PaperBlade Ltd
Roger Sumner Rivers, Managing Director, ParcelHero.com
Michael Sly, Director, Park Farm Thorney
Lee Parker , Managing Director, Parker Sourcing
David Earnshaw, Managing Director, Parkinson Harness Technology Ltd
Graham Paskett , Managing Director, Paskett Public Relations Limited
Eileen Burbidge MBE, Partner, Passion Capital
Stefan Glänzer, Co-Founder, Passion Capital
Olivia Knight, Owner, Patchwork Present
Michael Paterson, Managing Director, Paterson Wood Ltd
Paul Simpson, Director, Paul Simpson Consulting
Itamar Lesuisse, Co-Founder and CEO, Peak
John Fallon, CEO, Pearson
Paul Corcoran, Managing Director, Pennine Cycles
Saurav Chopra, Co-Founder & CEO, Perkbox & Huddlebuy
Andrew Keen, Managing Director, Permaban Ltd
Peter Mikic, Managing Director, Peter Mikic Interiors
Ayman Asfari, CEO, Petrofac
Jose Falcon, Country Manager, PharmaMar
Shadi Razak, Director, Pharos Consulting Limited
Phil Marfleet, Director, Phil Marfleet Ltd
Lyndsey James, Founder, Photocraft Online Photography School
Stephanie Kingsland, Director, Pierreponts Café
Charlie Mullins, CEO, Pimlico Plumbers
Sandy Forster, Co-Founder and Sales Director, Pinipa
Kim Nilsson, CEO, Pivigo
Matt Harris, Owner, Planet of the Grapes Ltd
Mandy Bailey, Founder, Plant-n-grow
Graham Spencer, Executive Director, Plants for Europe
Paul Varga, Founder and CEO, Playbrush
Paul Swaddle , CEO & Co-Founder, Pocket App
Marc Vlessing, CEO, Pocket Living
Piotr Zawalich, Managing Director, Poles Apart Property Management LTD t/a EUROLETS
Guy Blaskey, Founder, Pooch & Mutt
Adam Purvis, CEO, Power of Youth
Damian Utton, Director, Pozzoni Architecture Ltd
Simon Morioka, Managing Director, PPL Consulting
Scott Rowland, Chief Executive, Precept
Preema Kohli-Verma, CEO, Preema International Limited
Greg Simpson, Founder and Managing Director, Press For Attention PR Ltd
Zoe Downey, Managing Director, Prestige Wedding Fairs Ltd
Virginia Choy, Co-Founder and COO, PretaGov
Christina Chappell, Director, Pretty Abstract
Alan Jones, CEO, Prif Gear
Kim Nilsson, CEO and Co-Founder, Pivigo
Phyllis Han, Director, Proactive Tax Management Ltd
Simon Astill, CEO, ProAnnexUs
David Richards CBE, Chairman, Prodrive
Sean Seton-Rogers, Partner, PROfounders Capital
Dr Ted Fjallman, Chief Executive Officer, Prokarium Ltd
Gregg Iceton, Managing Director, Prokarya
Nigel Lugg, Group Chairman and CEO, Prominent Europe Ltd
Joe Cohen, Founder and CEO, Property.Works
Manjit Wolstenholme, Chairman, Provident Financial plc
Mike Wells, CEO, Prudential
Dr John Beadle, Chief Executive Officer, PsiOxus Therapeutics Ltd
Peter Roberts*, Executive Chairman, PureGym
Dr Oliver Hardick, Chief Executive Officer and Founder, Puridify Ltd
Ian Powell, Chairman and Senior Partner, PWC
Grev Lushington, Founder and Director, Quantock Clothing Ltd
Graham Cooke, CEO, Qubit
Karina Perdomo, Director, Quick Brown Fox
Mary Quicke, Managing Director, Quickes Traditional Limited
Neville Crawley, CEO, Quid Inc
Bob Tarzey, Director, Quocirca Ltd
Clive Longbottom, Director, Quocirca Ltd
Duncan Worth , Chairman, QV Foods
Nigel Miller , Partner, R A Miller & Son
David Richardson, Director, R C Richardson & Sons
Richard Butler , Partner, R.J. Butler & Son
Dan Sutherland, Founder, R3 Labs
Raman Sehgal, Director, Ramarketing & PR Ltd
Neil Cocker, CEO, Ramp Commerce
Baroness Rebuck DBE, Gail Rebuck, Chair, Penguin Random House UK
Anil Kumar, Chairman, Ransat Group
Luke Scheybeler, Co-Founder Rapha, and Tracksmith
Bruce Renfrew, Managing Director, Rapitypes Limited
Rajesh Agrawal, Founder & Chairman, RationalFX
Mairtin O’Riada, Founder and CIO, Ravelin Technology Ltd
Nick Lally, Co-Founder and COO, Ravelin Technology Ltd
Michael Papé , Director, Ravensden plc
Ryan Prince, Chief Executive, Real Star Living
Rebecca Coldicott, Director, Realise Agency
Rakesh Kapoor*, Chief Executive, Reckitt Benckiser plc
Rich Brady , Director, Recruit Packs
Peter Quantick, Director, Red Knight Consultancy
Manoj Nair, Founder and CEO, Redgirraffe.com
Ken Anderson, CEO, Redkite Animation
Janice Hughes, Founder & Chief Executive Officer, Redshift Strategy Ltd
Martin Taylor, Chief Marketing Officer, Redwood Technologies Group Limited
James Reed, Chairman, Reed Group
Andy Phillipps, Co-Founder Active Hotels (now Booking.com)
Co-Founder and Chairman, Reevoo
Andrea Reynolds, Founding Partner, Refresch
Gemma Vanson, Co-Director, REIN
Rebecca Morter, Co-Director, REIN
Adam Quinney, Partner, Reins Farm
Graham Chipchase*, CEO, Rexam
Richard Jones, Director, Richard Jones Consultancy
Christopher Murray, Managing Director, Ridgeford
Tamara Roberts , CEO, Ridgeview Estate Winery Limited
Tony O’Donnell, Chairman, Rift Technology Ltd
Sir Peter Rigby, CEO & Chairman, Rigby Group plc
Ibrahim Dogus, Managing Director, Rimad Ltd
Jan Du Plessis, Chairman, Rio Tinto
Tom Griffin, CEO, RipJar
Grant Neville, Director, Rivalogix Limited
Nick Bion, Managing Director, Robert Bion and Company Limited
Sir Simon Robey, Partner, Robey Warshaw LLP
Simon Warshaw, Partner, Robey Warshaw LLP
Philip Apostolides, Partner, Robey Warshaw LLP
Debbie Assinder, Co-Director, Rodborough Consultancy Limited
Warren East CBE, CEO, Rolls Royce
Ravi Pandey*, Managing Director, Rolta UK Ltd
Rose Heyman, Founder and Chairman, Rose Uniacke Studio
Anna Kanisius, Managing Director, Rosemead Property Investments Limited
Chanda Pandya, Brand Director, Rossana UK Ltd
Sean Dooley , Director, Row Group
Ben Van Beurden, CEO, Royal Dutch Shell
Stephen Hester, CEO, RSA Insurance
Michael O’Leary, Chief Executive, Ryanair
Alan Clark, CEO, SABMiller
Pierre-André de Chalendar, Chairman and CEO, Saint Gobain
Marc Sansom, Director, SALUS Global Knowledge Exchange
Duncan Young, Managing Director, Sanderson Young
Nathan Bostok, CEO, Santander UK
Shriti Vadera, Chair, Santander UK

Kate Grussing, Managing Director, Sapphire Partners
Caroline Cole, Director, Savoir Faire Accounting Ltd
Roy Williams, Managing Director, Scandef Ltd
Bronte Aurell, Founding Director, Scandinavian Kitchen
Jonas Aurell, Founding Director, Scandinavian Kitchen
James Rigby, Chief Executive Officer, SCC
Alain De Botton, Founder, School of Life
Mark Downing, Managing Director, Scorpion Automotive
Dave Austin, Managing Director, Scott Precision Wire Ltd
Ryan Jones, Director, SD Maintenance Services Ltd
Marcus Wallenberg, Chairman, SEB
Fabien Riggall, Founder and Director, Secret Cinema
Beatriz Garcia-Martinez, Managing Director, SecurelyBe
Ben Grant, Chairman, Secureseal Systems Ltd
Carlos Eduardo Espinal, Partner, Seedcamp
Jeff Lynn, Co-Founder and CEO, Seedrs
Victoria Jackson, Founder, SeeingSticks
Andrew Varga , Managing Director, Seetru
Cecile Reinaud, Managing Director, Séraphine
Rupert Soames OBE, CEO, Serco Group plc
David Pealing , Director, Severnprint Limited
Rich Walker, Managing Director, Shadow Robot Company
Kate Tyler, Director, Shake Social
Laurence Grant, Director, Shaking Hands
Shane Record, Owner, Shane Record Paintings
Helen Doughty, Director and Co-Founder, SHD Composite Materials Ltd
Jane Shepherd, Director, Shepherd PR
Oliver Dowding, Director, Shepton Farms Ltd
Trevor Sherwen, Sherwen Engineering Ltd
Rodger Hartill, Sherwen Hoss
Charlie Allen , Managing Director, Shiner
Flemming Ornskov, MD, CEO, Shire plc
Rupert Laing, Associate Director, Short Bread House
Cozette McCreery, Director, SIBLING
Sid Bryan, Director, SIBLING
Juergen Maier, UK CEO, Siemens
Bhavin Shah, Director, Sigma Pharmaceuticals plc
Mark Lyndon, Managing Director, Signature Marketing
Colin Passmore, Senior Partner, Simmons and Simmons LLP
Jeremy Hoyland, Managing Partner, Simmons and Simmons LLP
Sir Simon Robertson, Director, Simon Robertson Associates
Vijay Goel, Partner, Singhania & Co
Baroness Harding*, Chief Executive, Sir Charles Dunstone CVO*, Chairman & Baroness Harding*
Richard Skan, Group Managing Director, Skan Group Holdings Ltd
Christine Van Zadelhoff, Director, Skis Amis Ltd
Simon Hansford, CEO, Skyscape
Roberto Quarta*, Chair, Smith & Nephew, and Chair, WPP
Melanie Goldsmith, Co -Founder and Director, Smith & Sinclaire
Annie Penn, Creative Director, Smokin Donut
Tony Smurfit, Group Chief Executive, Smurfit Kappa Group
Michael Minch-Dixon, Co-Founder, Snact
Richard Sinclair, Chief Executive, SNO
David Wilkinson, Managing Partner, Soho Strategy
Chris Poulton, Director, Solar Associates
Neeraj Arora*, Executive Vice President and Head of International Business, Sony Entertainment Television
Jonathan Grubin, Chief Executive, SoPost
Kim von Arx, Principle Owner, Sotaki Ltd
Claire Preston, CEO, Sound Training
Vivian Chan, Co-Founder and CEO, Sparrho
Tom Green, Chief Executive, Spearhead International
Chris Chidley, CEO, Specialist People Services Group
Andrew Ford, Managing Director, Speedwell Insurance Brokers Ltd
Dylan McKee, Co-Founder, SpreeTree
Doug Squires, Managing Director, Squires Gear and Engineering Ltd
Dan Harrison, Director, Squish Supply
Richard Gillingwater CBE, Chairman, Henderson Group & SSE plc
Olivia Grant, Managing Director, St Clements
Bill Winters CBE, CEO, Standard Chartered
Sir Gerry Grimstone, Chairman, Standard Life

Sabine VanderLinden, Managing Director, Startup Bootcamp InsurTech
Dan Olsson, CEO, Stena Line
Phil Donnelly, Founder and Director, Step Enterprise Ltd
Nahid Alaei , Director, StepChange Business Solutions Ltd
Vixy Rae, Creative Director, Stewart Christie & Co. Ltd
Graeme Jordan, Managing Director, STO Consulting Ltd
Ben Stone RIBA, Director, Stone + Associates - Chartered Architects
Helen Quenet , Director, StoneandSilver.co.uk
Kevin Reuter, Stonewest Ltd
Carol Lovell, Director, Stow
Vivek Agarwal, Founder & CEO, Strand of Silk Ltd
David Cutts , Managing Director, Strategy and Technology Limited
Joanna Strickland, Director, Strickland Accountancy Ltd
Charlie Fillingham, Managing Director, Strutt and Parker (Farms) Limited
Stuart Bruce, Principal, Stuart Bruce Associates
Stuart Hyde, Director, Stuart Hyde associates Ltd
Safia Qureshi, Founder and CEO, Studio D Tale
Christina Seilern, Principal Architect / Company Director, Studio Seilern Architects
Glyn Edwards, Chief Executive Officer, Summit (Oxford) Limited
Rami Ranger CBE, Chairman, Sunmark Ltd
Vikkas Puri, Director, Sunrise Developers Limited
Rich Pleeth , Founder, Sup
Ian Barnett, Director, Surfanic International Ltd
Oleg Fomenko, Co-Founder and CEO, SweatCoin
Lisa Tse, Founder, Sweet Mandarin
Steven Swift, Director, SwiftSure Services Limited
David Galbraith , Director, Swig Flasks
Brian Harrison, CEO, Swoon Editions
Taras Chaban, CEO, Sybenetix
Brian Donnelly, CEO, Synapse Information Ltd
Dr David Venables, Chief Executive Officer, Synpromics
Richard Knight, Director, Systematic Strategy
Angus Clark, CEO, T J International
Dr Paul Jonsen, Director, TalaveraScience
Sandy Lindsay MBE, Founder & Chair, Tangerine & The Juice Academy
Ted Nash, Co-Founder & CEO, Tapdaq
Dr Heather McGregor CBE, CEO, Taylor Bennett
Kerri Hull, Managing Director, Teach You Ltd
Darren Padgett, Director, Team Activ
Sue Black, Director, Techmums Ltd
Nitin Dahad, Founder, Techspark Limited
Daniel Crespi, Managing Director, Telcoinabox
Ronan Dunne, CEO, Telefonica O2 UK
Alice Temperley, Creative Director, Temperley London
Sarah Bell, CEO, Tempus Energy
Justin King CBE, Vice Chairman, Terra Firma
Ranjit Thaker, Director, Thaker Acquisitions Ltd
Victor Chavez, Chief Executive, Thales UK
Andeep Mangal, Director, Thapers Chartered Accountants
Johnny Hornby, Chief Executive, The & Partnership
Philip Martin, Managing Director, The 3rd Degree
Andy Habbershaw, Director, The Action Dry Ltd
Sean Taggart , Chairman, The Albatross Group
Lucy Armstrong, CEO, The Alchemists
James Eder, Co-Founder, The Beans Group Ltd
Tom Druitt, Managing Director, The Big Lemon CIC
David Lockwood, Director, The Bike Shed Theatre
Katie Rose, Director, The Bridge Ltd
Helen Chesshire, Founder, The Brighton Spirit Company Ltd
Reiner Luyken , Director, The Brochs of Coigach Ltd
Julie Deane OBE, Founder and CEO, The Cambridge Satchel Company
Corinne Laurie, Managing Director, The Camouflage Company
David M Reed, Chief Executive Officer, The Channel Managing Agency
James Averdieck, Founder, GÜ, and The Coconut Collaborative
Martin Best, Director and Partner, The Corporate Theatre
Carolyn Dailey, Founder, The Dailey Partnership
Jarlath Watson, Managing Director, The Echlinville Distillery
Sarah Windrum, CEO, The Emerald Group
Prof David Hill, Chairman, The Environment Bank Ltd
Emma Selby, Director, The Farnham Hub Ltd
Stuart Searle, Managing Director, The First Mailing Co Ltd
Jessica Harris, Hub Manager, The Folkestone Business Hub
Stuart Lodge, Director, The Global Village
Huw Rowlands , Partner, The Grange Farm
Jay Risbridger, Director, The Green Stationery Company
Matthew Moulding, CEO, The Hut Group
Jenni Gwiazdowski, Director, The London Bike Kitchen
Bhavini Kalaria, Managing Director, The London Law Practice Ltd
Andrew Swaffield, Chief Executive Officer, The Monarch Group
Margo Marrone, Co-Founder, The Organic Pharmacy
Hilary Devey CBE, Founder, CEO and Chairman, The Pall-Ex Group
Mark Woodward, CEO, The Paper Cup Company
Mike Davies, Chairman, The Principle Healthcare Group
Rory Curnock-Cook, Managing Director and Co-Founder, The Profs
Maura Collyer, Owner, The Racehorse Pub
Louise Oldfield , Co-owner, The Reading Rooms
Samantha Thompson, Managing Director, The Ripon Spa Hotel
Baroness Rogers MBE, Owner, The River Café
Paul Vallely, Managing Director, The Rug House
Sophie Kyle, Publisher, The Skinny
Julian Temperley, Founder, The Somerset Cider Brandy Co Ltd
Sally Ford-Hutchinson, Managing Director, The Thinking Shop
Niamh Barker , Managing Director, The Travelwrap Company Limited
Richard Smith, Founder, The Wine School of Cheshire
Tim Dwelly, Director, The Workbox Penzance
Aldo Monteforte, CEO, The Floow
Angela Mathis, CEO, ThinkTank Maths Ltd
Mark Lowe, Managing Director, Third City
Thomas Purchas, CTO and Co-Founder, ThirdEye labs
Stephen Wright, Managing Director, Thorite
Samantha Mant, Director, Threesixty Services
Chris Thurling, Founder, Thurling Jones Ltd
Terry Sargeant, Chairman, ThyssenKrupp UK
Stephen Weil, Partner, TI Partners
George Bevis, Founder and CEO, TIDE
Lord Levene, Chairman, Tikehau Investment Management
Barnaby Lashbrooke, CEO, Time etc
Frankie Snobel, Director, Tipplesworth
Dr Morag McFarlane, Chief Executive Officer, Tissue Solutions Ltd
Ian Whiting, CEO, Titania
Allon Zloof, Director, Tom Smarte London
Mike Tomkins, Co-Founder, TopCashback
Oliver Ragg, Co-Founder, TopCashback
John Blundell, Director, ToppStoppa Ltd
Patrick Pouyanné, Chairman and CEO, TOTAL
Will Dean, Founder, Tough Mudder
Frank Hester OBE, Founder and CEO, TPP
Alexandre Dalyac, Co-Founder and CEO, Tractable
Taavet Hinrikus, CEO and Co-Founder, TransferWise
Ian Bloomer, Manging Director, Transport Data Interchange Ltd
David Goater, Managing Director and Owner, Trans-Tronic Ltd
Lloyd Dorfman CBE, Founder, Travelex, and Chairman of The Office Group and Doddle
Chris Hale*, Senior Partner, Travers Smith LLP
Lopo Champalimaud, Founder and CEO, Treatwell
Troo Heath-Crew, Founder and Creative Director, Tree Couture Ltd
Shelley Taylor, Founder and CEO, Trellyz
Marc Gaudart, Founder and Managing Partner, Trent Advisory Services
Charlie Osmond, Chief Tease, TRIPTEASE
Ken Wittamore, Managing Director, Triskel Marine Ltd
Terry Rosoman, Director, Trosoman Design
Bernardo Ivo Cruz, Global Managing Partner, True Bridge Consultancy Group
Matt Truman, CEO and Co-Founder, True Capital
Paul Cocker, Co-Founder, True Capital
Pete Flint, Founder, Trulia
Ishaan Malhi, Founder and CEO, Trussle.com
Peter Long, Supervisory Board Member & former Chief Executive, TUI Travel
Mike Bandar, Co-Founder, Turn Partners
Tallie Maughan, Creative Director, Turning Earth UK
Gabrielle Lixton, Managing Director, Turtle Tots
Ryan James, Owner, Two Fat Ladies
Sarah Woodhead, Director, Two London
Chris Puttick, Co-Founder, TwoTen
Tarja Stenvall, General Manager, UK Sanofi Ltd
Ian Parsley, Chairman, Ultonia Communications
Rakesh Sharma*, Chief Executive, Ultra Electronics Holdings
Thomas Leysen, Chairman of the Board, Umicore
Matthew Anderson, Vice-President, Unicorn ARC
Parita Patel, Director, Uniflora Limited
Paul Polman, CEO, Unilever
Francis Toye, Founder and CEO, The Unilink Group
Mark Russell, Co-Founder and COO, Universal Basket
Steve Rogers, Director, Universal Gold
Sir Lucian Grainge CBE, Chairman and CEO, Universal Music Group
David Joseph CBE, Chairman and CEO, Universal Music UK
Luis Arriaga, Managing Director, UPS UK Ltd
Carl Partridge, Director, UrbanThings
Jim Byrne, Director & Chairman, VA Technology Ltd
Abhishek Sachdev, Managing Director, Vedanta Hedging Limited
Ross Williams, Founder and CEO, Venntro Media Group
Chris West, Founder, Verbal Identity Ltd
Simon Lyons, Director, Version 22 Design LTD
Bob Partridge , European Vetinary Specialist, Vet Hospital
Victoria Larsen, Director, Victoria Larsen Consulting Ltd
Darren Joint, Managing Director, Viking Signs Ltd
Kate Unsworth, Founder and CEO, VINAYA
Peter Berry, Managing Partner, VIP Labels
Sir Richard Branson, Founder, Virgin Group
Tom Mockridge, CEO, Virgin Media
Jayne-Anne Gadhia CBE, CEO, Virgin Money
Glen Moreno, Chairman, Virgin Money

Jeremy Owen, Director, Vita (Europe) Ltd
Ian Taylor, CEO and President, Vitol
Veronica White, Director, VJW Consulting Limited
Vittorio Colao, CEO, Vodafone
Wolfgang Eder, Chairman and CEO, Voestalpine
Caroline Towers, Co-Founder, Voltage Sport
Arabella Preston, Co-Founder, Votary
Sir Peter Kendall , Director, W J Kendall Contracting Limited
Prof Dr Uwe Krueger, CEO, W.S. Atkins
Stefano Pessina*, CEO, Walgreens Boots Alliance
Josh Dugdale , Director, Wasing Leisure Ltd
Di Wastenage , Director, Wastenage Farms Limited
Steve Berry , Chairman, Waterbridge Capital Limited
James Daunt, Founder, Daunt Books, CEO, Waterstones
James Wates CBE, Chairman, Wates Group
Chris Lowe, Managing Partner, Watson Farley & Williams LLP
Andrew Waugh, Director, Waugh Thistleton Architects
Peter Ward, Co-Founder and CEO, WAYN
Ben Web, Owner, Web Thirst Limited
Andy Atkins-Krueger, CEO, Webcertain Group Ltd
Simon Wells, Creative Director, Webcine
Daniel Rajkumar, Managing Director, Web-Translations
Andy Stephenson, Founder and CEO, Weekend Box Club
John Schorah, Managing Partner, Weightmans LLP
Keith Cochrane CBE, Chief Executive, Weir Group
Paul Pitcher, Managing Director, Wellington Group
Gareth Jones , CEO and Founder, Welsh ICE
William Wemyss, Chairman, Wemyss Development Co. Ltd
David Hartley, Managing Director, Wensleydale Dairy Products Ltd
Sir Terry Matthews, Chairman, Wesley Clover
Baroness Brady

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2016 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Absolutely MINDBLOWING article - survey etc - repeating this from above

Scots prefer post-Brexit UK to independence, poll finds
https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/politics/scots-want-stay-part-post -brexit-uk-poll-finds/

The poll's findings suggest that most Scots do not want another referendum on independence despite the EU vote
(Photo: Getty) Chris Green 0:01 Saturday July 30th 2016
A clear majority of Scots want the country to stay part of a post-Brexit UK rather than becoming independent and remaining part of the EU, an opinion poll has found. The results of the survey, carried out a month after the result of the European referendum, calls into question Scotland’s appetite for a re-run of 2014’s vote on independence. “The arguments for Scotland remaining a part of the UK are just as compelling as they were in 2014 – in or out of the EU” Lord Dunlop The YouGov poll found that 46 per cent of Scots would prefer to remain part of a post-Brexit UK, while only 37 per cent favoured of breaking up the Union and being allowed to remain in the EU. The results will be seen as a blow to the SNP’s hopes of securing independence for Scotland following the UK’s decision to leave the EU last month, which came despite 62 per cent of Scots voting to remain.
IndyRef2? Nicola Sturgeon, the SNP leader, warned in the aftermath of the result that a second referendum on Scottish independence was now “highly likely” as voters would be furious at the prospect of being dragged out of the EU against their will. The survey also found that the result of the EU vote has not had much of an impact on people’s opinions on independence, with a majority of people continuing to favour remaining part of the UK. Only 47 per cent said they want Scotland to become an independent country, while 53 per cent want to keep the Union intact, the poll of more than 1,000 Scottish adults found. The survey also showed that more Scots would rather be part of a post-Brexit UK with no access to the EU’s single market than leave the Union to secure continued free trade, with 40 per cent favouring the former scenario and only 34 per cent the latter. “Inevitably, some will suggest that the high-water mark of Scottish independence has now passed, especially as it was thought that leaving the EU might persuade No voters to change their minds and vote against the Union,” said Joe Twyman, YouGov’s head of political and social research. “However, the situation is, naturally, more complicated than that. There remains a great deal of uncertainty about what the UK’s relationship with the EU will look like…once precise details of Brexit are hammered out it could change the whole context of the independence debate.” ‘Divisive constitutional debate’ The Scottish Conservatives said the poll’s findings “completely exposes the SNP’s post-Brexit hyperbole” and called on Ms Sturgeon’s party to “get back to the day job, instead of agitating for yet another independence drive”. Scotland Office Minister Lord Dunlop added that another “divisive constitutional debate” was not want the country wanted. “The arguments for Scotland remaining a part of the UK are just as compelling as they were in 2014 – in or out of the EU,” he said. “The Prime Minister has been very clear that we are going to make a success of Brexit, and the focus now needs to be on collaborative working with the Scottish Government as ‘Team UK’ to ensure the best possible deal for Scotland and the rest of the UK.” However, the SNP pointed out that support for independence had risen since YouGov’s last poll on the subject, suggesting that No voters were reconsidering their views in light of the UK’s decision to leave the EU. “In light of the overwhelming vote to remain in the EU, it is right that the Scottish Government explores every option to protect our relationship with and place in the EU – including the option of another independence referendum if that is what it takes,” said SNP business convener Derek Mackay.

Read more at: https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/environment/fears-china-security-m ay-underlie-mays-hinkley-delay/

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Last edited by TonyGosling on Tue Sep 20, 2016 9:55 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bump!
Thomas Tol wrote:
The idea for the Federation of Europe probably started here?

The United States of Europe on the eve of the Parliament of peace
by Stead, W. T. (William Thomas), 1849-1912

Published 1899.

https://archive.org/details/unitedstateseur01steagoog

He was also responsible for this:

The Americanization of the world;
by Stead, William T[homas] 1849-1912. [from old catalog]

Published [1902]

https://archive.org/details/americanizationo01stea

Looks like long term plans coming to fruition.

Oh...and Goldman Sachs.

What price the new democracy? Goldman Sachs conquers Europe:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/what- price-the-new-democracy-goldman-sachs-conquers-europe-6264091.html

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bump!
TonyGosling wrote:
OSS, CIA and European Unity: The American Committee on United Europe, 1948-60
http://www.pdf-archive.com/2016/06/01/oss-cia-united-europe-eec-eu/
RICHARD J. ALDRICH
https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/pais/people/aldrich/publications/os s_cia_united_europe_eec_eu.pdf

During the last ten years, diplomatic historians have attached
growing significance to intelligence, and the related subject of covert
operations, as increasingly important to an understanding of the early
Cold War.1
After 1945, a variety of Western organizations, not just
intelligence agencies, drew up programmes of covert operations
designed both to undermine Communist influence in Europe and to
ensure a welcome for the Marshall Plan. Examples have been
documented in the fields of electoral politics, organized labour and
cultural affairs. US officials trying to rebuild and stabilize postwar
Europe worked from the assumption that it required rapid
unification, perhaps leading to a United States of Europe. The
encouragement of European unification, one of the most consistent
components of Harry S. Truman's foreign policy, was even more
strongly emphasized under his successor General Dwight D.
Eisenhower. Moreover, under both Truman and Eisenhower, US
policymakers conceived of European unification not only as an
important end in itself, but also as a way to solve the German
problem.2
The use of covert operations for the specific promotion of
European unity has attracted little scholarly attention and remains
poorly understood.
One of the most interesting US covert operations in postwar
Europe was the funding of the European Movement. The European
Movement was an umbrella organization which led a prestigious, if
disparate, group of organizations urging rapid unification in Europe,
focusing their efforts upon the Council of Europe, and counting
Winston Churchill, Paul-Henri Spaak, Konrad Adenauer, Leon Blum
and Alcide de Gasperi as its five Presidents of Honour. In 1948, its
Diplomacy & Statecraft, Vol.8, No.l (March 1997), pp. 184-227
PUBLISHED BY FRANK CASS, LONDON
Downloaded By: [University of Warwick] At: 16:20 10 February 2009OSS, CIA AND EUROPEAN UNITY 185
main handicap was the scarcity of funds. It will be argued here that
the discreet injection of over three million dollars between 1949 and
1960, mostly from US government sources, was central to efforts to
drum up mass support for the Schuman Plan, the European Defence
Community and a European Assembly with sovereign powers. This
covert contribution never formed less than half the European
Movement's budget and, after 1952, probably two-thirds. Simultaneously
they sought to undermine the staunch resistance of the British Labour
government to federalist ideas.3
This essay concentrates on the US dimension of these activities.4
The conduit for American assistance was the American Committee on
United Europe (ACUE), directed by senior figures from the American
intelligence community. This body was organized in the early Summer
of 1948 by Allen Welsh Dulles, then heading a committee reviewing
the organization of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) on behalf of
the National Security Council (NSC), and also by William J. Donovan,
former head of the wartime Office of Strategic Services (OSS). They
were responding to separate requests for assistance from Count
Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi, a veteran Pan-European campaigner
from Austria, and from Churchill. ACUE worked closely with US
government officials, particularly those in the Economic Cooperation
Administration (ECA) and also with the National Committee for a
Free Europe.

_________________
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www.thisweek.org.uk
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www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bump! 1942 EEC
TonyGosling wrote:
EUropaische WirtschaftGemeinschaft as published in Nazi Germany in 1942 being the foundations of todays EUropean Union.
http://www.silentmajority.co.uk/silentmajority/eurorealist/Germany1942  /index.html

EUropaische WirtschaftGemeinschaft as published in Nazi Germany in 1942 being the foundations of todays EUropean Union.

Keep an eye on our web site
www.SilentMajority.co.UK

where you will find the full text as and when we post it at:
www.SilentMajority.co.UK/EUroRealist/Germany1942

THE TRUTH WILL BE A HARD ACT TO FOLLOW for the Political scum and their apparatchiks in the EU who seek to continue to destroy Britain for their own gain in compliance with the 1942 German documents.

I would like to thank ALL those who have given such an immense amount of
help in the location, acquisition!!!, translation and now distribution of
this seminal document which undermines ALL of the LIES of ALL of the
politicians about the benign and beneficial aims of the EU - they are EVIL
and they are forming an Evil Union as part of the Evil concept of the New
World Order comprising the serfs and the self styled elite and their
apparatchiks.

I have refrained from thanking ANYONE by name as there are some in the chain of delivery who have gone to not inconsiderable risk to bring these truths to YOU. To name anyone would be to expose others!!

Just the same - thank you to the stalwart group of Patriots who have helped
me, both in a sense of Patriotism and in a belief that the truth should be
known.

Anyone wishing to forward it to the media is encouraged so to do but PLEASE include both my 'e'mail and my phone number so that we can maximise on this weapon in the defence of our Nation against its enemies both within and foreign, political and economic.

I would suggest that should you wish to help you forward these pamphlets in there entirety as attachments where possible as widely as you know how .
The publication of these documents is in no way an attack on the German
people. Their politicians, as with our own and of the world continue to lie to
the people in order to fulfil their greed filled aims in controlling the world whilst by-passing the people of individual countries.

Regards,
Greg

Greg Lance - Watkins,
c/o Glance Back Books,
Cynulliad i Gymru - The Welsh Assembly,
17 Upper Church Street,
CHEPSTOW,
NP16 5EX
Monmouthshire,
Britain.
Greg@glanceback.demon.co.uk
Tel/Fax: 01291 - 62 65 62

For More Information & Facts visit: WEB SITES:
www.SilentMajority.co.UK
www.MrCHAD.co.UK
www.WelshAssembly.org.UK
-\\\|///-
= ~ =
(`~0~0~')
-------oooO------(_)-------Oooo--------
Regards
M rC H A D
---------- ----------- ----------- ------------



TonyGosling wrote:
Europaische
WirtschaftsGemeinschaft
BEING in Translation:
EUropean Economic
Community

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/lee.riley/Notices/EWG.pdf
http://www.bilderberg.org/EWG.pdf

Von:
ReichsWirtschaftMinister u. President der Deutschen
ReichsBank Funk;
Professor Dr. Jecht, Berlin; Professor Dr. Woermann, Halle;
Dr. Reithinger, Berlin; MinisterialDirektor Dr. Benning, Berlin;
Gesandter Dr. Clodius, Berlin, und GauWirtschaftsBerater
Professor
Dr. Hunke, Berlin
Mit einer EinFuhrung von:
GauWirtschaftsBerater Professor Dr. Heinrich Hunke
President des Vereins Berliner Kaufleute und Industrieller
HerausGeGeben von dem
Verein Berliner Kaufleute und der Wirtschafts –
HochSchule
Und Industrieller
Berlin
Published
BERLIN 1942
Second edition 1943
Haude & Spenesche VerlagsBuchHandlung Max Paschke
---------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------
-----------
To assist non Germans, reading the above, certain letters have been capitalised for convenience
ONLYThe European Economic Community
Mr. Funk, the Reich’s Economic Minister and President of the German
Reichsbank
Professor Dr. Jecht, Berlin
Professor Dr. Woermann, Halle
Dr. Reithinger, Berlin, Ministerial Director
Dr. Beisiegel, Berlin
Secretary of State Königs, Berlin
Director Dr. Benning, Berlin
Ambassador Dr. Clodius, Berlin and Economics Committee Advisor
Professor Dr. Hunke, Berlin
With an introduction by
Economics Committee Advisor, Professor Dr. Heinrich Hunke, President of
the Society of Berlin Industry and Commerce
Issued by
The Society of Berlin Industry and Commerce and the Berlin School of
Economics
Published BERLIN 1942
Second Revised Edition (Berlin 1943)
Haude and Spenersche Publishing House Max PaschkePreface to the First and Second Edition
This text contains the lectures presented under the title “The European
Economic Community” by the Society of Berlin Industry and Commerce
at the start of 1942 in conjunction with the Economic Advisor to the
Berlin Committee of the NSDAP and The Chamber of Trade and
Industry. The order of lectures was as follows:
• Walter Funk, Reichs Economic Minister and President of the Reichsbank:
“The Economic Face of the New Europe”
• Dr. Horst Jecht, Professor at The Berlin School of Economics:
“Developments towards the European Economic
Community”
• Dr. Emil Woermann, Professor at Halle University:
“European Agriculture”
• Dr. Anton Reithinger, Director of the Economics Department of I.G.
Farbenindustrie A.G., Berlin:
“The European Industrial Economy”
• Dr. Philipp Beisiegel, Ministerial Director of the Reich’s Labour Ministry:
“The Deployment of Labour in Europe”
• Gustav Koenigs, Secretary of State, Berlin:
“Questions About European Transport”
• Dr. Bernhard Benning, Director of the Reich’s Credit Company, Berlin:
“Questions About Europe’s Currency”
• Dr. Carl Clodius, Ambassador of the Foreign Office:
“European Trade and Economic Agreements’’
• Professor Dr. Heinrich Hunke, Economic Committee Advisor of the NSDAP,
President of Germany’s Economic Publicity Agency and the Berlin Society of
Industry and Commerce:
“The Basic Question: Europe - Geographical Concept or
Political Fact?”
The lectures met with considerable interest and very strong agreement. On
account of this, we feel we should make them available to a wider circle of
people. Berlin, September 1942

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TonyGosling
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Joined: 25 Jul 2005
Posts: 14978
Location: St. Pauls, Bristol, England

PostPosted: Sun Sep 18, 2016 11:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since when has the Tory party ever abided by the law?
Britain could be fined millions of pounds if it tries to negotiate trade agreements before leaving the EU
'We will fully comply with our responsibilities and exercise our rights as a member of the EU' Government spokesperson says
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/brexit-britain-fined-ne gotiate-trade-agreements-deals-before-leaving-european-union-commissio n-a7314816.html
Britain could be fined millions of pounds if it tries to negotiate trade agreements with other countries before leaving the European Union.
The European Commission and other EU countries could take the UK to court if the Government begins talks with countries already in negotiations with the EU.
Failing to comply with demands from Brussels could lead to “infraction proceedings brought by the European Commission” and “infringement actions by member states”, papers seen by The Sunday Times suggest.
If such legal proceedings were brought against the UK, it would be “required to pay a fine”....

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www.rethink911.org
www.actorsandartistsfor911truth.org
www.mediafor911truth.org
www.pilotsfor911truth.org
www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.l911t.com
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
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