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Kanga Tyron - Mysterious death of Charles' other Mistress

 
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scienceplease 2
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 7:36 am    Post subject: Kanga Tyron - Mysterious death of Charles' other Mistress Reply with quote

I know Tony had an article here about the strange suicide of Prince Charle's
Florist's Husband.

I can't find the article. Perhaps Tony can find and link.

Here's another strange story...

I watched last night a TV program on Channel 4 (On Demand) about the life and death of Prince Charles' other Mistress, Dael Harper aka "Kanga" or Kanga Tyron (all the same person).

In the newspapers there is this article.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1076026/The-lonely-death-Cha rless-mistress.html

First of all the shocking revelation that Diana knew of BOTH of Charle's mistresses before her marriage!

Story of sordid going-ons and finally Kanga's multiple near death and fatal events...

Quote:
What happened next remains the subject of immense speculation to this day. While undergoing treatment there, Kanga fell from a high window, shattering her spine. As she lay in hospital recovering, she claimed to have been pushed, but it was always assumed that, emotional as she obviously was then, she had jumped.

In Channel 4's documentary, the actress Sarah Miles, a great friend of Kanga's, gives an electrifying account of what happened, as she describes Kanga insisting to her that she was indeed pushed.

She also recounts the family's bizarre response to this latest calamity, when Lord Tryon invited her to lunch, along with ten other hangers-on, to reassure her that Kanga wasn't pushed and had, in fact, fallen.

Barely a matter of weeks after her fall, Kanga was to be told by her husband that he wanted a divorce. Then came the final coup de grace - she was arrested on the drive to her country mansion and then sectioned under the Mental Health Act. Friends say that she had started fantasising that someone was trying to kill her.

Her behaviour, it's true, had become erratic. But few people who knew her at the time would say that she presented a threat to herself or anyone else, and the decision to have her arrested remains inexplicable. Wheelchair-bound and in a very distressed mental and physical state, she was locked up for hours in a Salisbury police cell - an act which, to this day, seems incomprehensibly and unnecessarily cruel.

But, once more, Kanga bounced back. Summoning what strength remained, she put her affairs in order and booked herself into a suite at The Ritz - after her divorce, she had no other home, so why not the Ritz, darling? It was there that I found her, at an adjoining table at lunch, one day. We talked about old times - the people we knew, the parties that we'd gone to. I was astonished that, after all she'd endured, she was in such fine fettle.

But at the time, I didn't know the complete story: that she had swapped her addiction to painkillers for an addiction for alcohol. She kept it fairly well concealed, but not totally.

Dark thoughts were clouding her mind, not all of them rational. The end was coming - and in November 1997, she died. She had travelled to India, where she contracted an illness and had to return to the UK. Here, she was hospitalised but developed septicaemia and, just two months short of her 50th birthday, died.

She had been very famous, but, in the end, Kanga's celebrity proved to be so short-lived that she was never written about again. Maybe the nation had had enough grieving. Princess Diana's death occurred some three months earlier. You could say there were no tears left.

Certainly, it's likely that Prince Charles had few to spare for his former mistress, for in those last dog-days, Kanga had gone a little bit crazy. At a time when he was trying to rehabilitate his reputation with the British public - Diana's death triggered angry accusations against Camilla, and Charles's reputation was in danger of going down with hers - the Prince needed Kanga like a cat needs a dog.

Tragically for her, it was at precisely this time that she became increasingly obsessed by him.

On one occasion, in July 1997, she was seen, at a polo match at Tidworth, furiously pursuing her former lover in her wheelchair.

When news of this tragic - comic even - event reached the general public, and anxiety was expressed as to her state of mind, the Prince coolly issued a statement saying he was in touch with Kanga 'once or twice a year', but that they were no longer the friends they had once been.

To most rational people, this could only be interpreted as the very direct snub that it was intended to be. But to Sarah Miles, Kanga now declared, 'I am going to be Queen of England.'

And so, on 15 November, 1997, the once cuddly, lovable, gorgeous Lady Tryon went to her lonely death: not a queen, no longer even married to a peer, and homeless. Loving Prince Charles broke her heart and - in the end - cracked her mind.
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scienceplease 2
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is more than enough motive, means and opportunity to warrant a murder investigation...

Essentially the same story as the Daily Mail's - written by the same person.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/world/royal-affair-killed-kanga/story -e6frf7m6-1111117856454

Quote:
Royal affair killed 'Kanga'

by: Charles Wilson

SHE was the Australian who married a peer and became a prince's lover. But the affair broke her heart and unhinged her mind.

The name is largely forgotten. The big hair, luscious lips and constant partying have so faded in memory that they may never have existed.

When Dale "Kanga'' Tryon, once a household name and a central figure in the life of the Prince of Wales, died three months after Princess Diana, in 1997, she was quickly forgotten.

Nobody ever quite understood how she fitted into the royal jigsaw.

For most people, the battle for Charles's heart was a straight play-off between two women: married Camilla, his one true love, and Diana, a knee-jerk response to a nation baying for a royal bride.

But, for a time, Kanga was as important to Charles as Camilla. Yet the story of how she came to love and lose her prince has never been fully told. Until now. A new TV documentary and book reveals for the first time the extraordinary bed-hopping antics of the heir to the throne in the years before his marriage to Diana.

High Society reveals how, for a time during the 1970s, when both women were married to friends of his, His Royal Highness bounced from the bed of Camilla to that of Lady Tryon, then back again. While dithering over the very necessary duty of finding a suitable wife, Charles was happily having his cake and eating it.

For both women were his mistresses and both bore sons whose godfather he became.

Both were named Charles - in Camilla's case, it was a second name. And, in the end, both hated the other with a loathing that bordered on the pathological. Yet we know only about Camilla.

Dale Harper was born in 1947 to a wealthy Melbourne family.

The bare bones of her life - childhood spina bifida, youthful dalliances, schooling at Lauriston and a swift engagement to an Old Etonian peer and banker, Lord Tryon - fill out the yellowing cuttings in newspaper archives.

But, these days, you don't hear her name mentioned.

Then she played a shrewd game, appearing to hate the limelight, but all the while, it was secretly meat and drink to her. Many aristocrats' wives were never seen in the company of the glitterati, but Kanga wasn't one of them. At such events, she would deliberately display a haughty demeanour -- God forbid someone of her social standing should court publicity.

But the truth is, Kanga was an astute businesswoman and understood that notoriety meant money.

Only she and her husband - one of Prince Charles's inner circle - knew the details of the family finances, or rather lack of them.


At the time that she and Lord Tryon married in 1973, his ancestral home, the Old Manor House at Great Durnford, near Salisbury, had been handed over to a school. Kanga later claimed her father's money provided the first roof over their heads. Yet, before too long, the manor became once more the family home, refurbished and repolished under her vigorous supervision and, as she said, with her money.

Through her husband she met Charles. Her beauty and Australian informality soon won his heart. In fact, the rest of his family adored her too: she and Lord Tryon were invited to Balmoral, where she would ride out with the Queen.

Returning the compliment, Lord Tryon invited Charles to his fishing lodge in Iceland. Sequestered so far away, Charles fell swiftly in love with his friend's wife.

Suddenly, Kanga discovered the enormous power wielded in high society by a woman who had become the Prince's mistress. It was something Camilla understood all too well, but, to a middle-class maven from Melbourne, so far removed from the arcane behaviour patterns of Britain's blue bloods, it came as a complete revelation.

Smitten by Charles she may have been, but she was smitten, too, by the new respect she was being shown by aristocrats who, up to this point, looked down their noses at her. In London, Kanga threw herself into the party circuit, mixing with the movers and shakers.

Throughout the 1970s and '80s, her life, with four lovely children and a peer for a husband, seemed effortless and easy. But behind closed doors, she was making money, buying, refurbishing and selling property. Then she branched out into the fashion business. Each time she wanted to plug something, she would discreetly let slip a nugget of gossip.

Did we know that her nickname Kanga came from HRH's very own lips? Or that he had labelled her "the only woman who ever understood me''. Then there was Charles's "private'' visit to her parental home in Melbourne that became common knowledge.

A coincidence, indeed, that the paparazzi, alerted by anonymous phone calls, were outside the house on that very night.

Finally, it emerged Kanga was in possession of a number of letters from HRH. Their content was never revealed, but if people were to imply they were love letters, what harm could there be in that?
When she set up her stall in Beauchamp Place, one of London's smartest addresses, she had no hesitation in calling her fashion business Kanga.

It was as good as hanging "by Royal appointment'' over the door.

The customers flocked in, despite the barely veiled titters in the fashion industry. From where they stood, there was little class or style attached to Kanga creations.

But even then there was a gap, a painful one, between the public and private persona of Lady Tryon.

She had given herself to the Prince of Wales and he had loved her, for however brief a time, but the rules of the game were such that she couldn't shout this great triumph from the rooftops.

Camilla, her rival, understood this instinctively, as one would when one's great-grandmother had had an affair with another Prince of Wales.

Kanga was from very different stock, and bottling it up, both the triumph of love and the loss of it to a rival, affected her deeply.

As the years wore on, she deemed her marriage to be loveless, though her husband was clearly devoted to their children.

And, as the gap between them widened, her health took a series of alarming downward lurches.

There was a recurrence of her childhood spina bifida and, as she fought this off, she was diagnosed with uterine cancer.

Through it all, Kanga never gave any sign of her inner distress and her outward calm and steely backbone were the talk of those who knew her.

Always a popular figure, she became more loved as she struggled with her physical ailments. Her lack of bitterness at the hand fate had dealt her was astonishing.

Finally, after enduring all the agonising treatment associated with cancer, she was given the all-clear and, in 1996, checked herself into Farm Place, a fashionable rehab clinic, to rid herself of her dependence on painkillers.

What happened next remains the subject of immense speculation. While undergoing treatment there, Kanga fell from a high window, shattering her spine. As she lay in hospital recovering, she claimed to have been pushed, but it was always assumed that she had jumped.

In the documentary, the actor Sarah Miles, a great friend of Kanga's, gives an electrifying account of Kanga insisting to her that she was indeed pushed.

She also recounts the family's bizarre response to this latest calamity, when Lord Tryon invited her to lunch, along with 10 others, to reassure her that Kanga wasn't pushed and had, in fact, fallen.

Weeks after her fall, Lord Tryon told Kanga he wanted a divorce.

Then came the final coup de grace. She was arrested on the drive to her country mansion and then sectioned under the Mental Health Act.

Friends say that she had started fantasising that someone was trying to kill her, though few would say that she presented a threat to herself or anyone else and the decision to have her arrested remains inexplicable.


Wheelchair-bound and in a very distressed mental and physical state, she was locked up for hours in a Salisbury police cell - an act which, to this day, seems incomprehensibly and unnecessarily cruel.

But, once more, Kanga bounced back.

Summoning what strength remained, she put her affairs in order and booked herself into a suite at The Ritz - after her divorce, she had no other home, so why not the Ritz, darling?

But she had swapped her addiction to painkillers for an addiction to alcohol.

Dark thoughts were clouding her mind, not all of them rational.

THE end was coming and in November 1997, she died. She had travelled to India, where she contracted an illness and had to return to Britain.

She went to hospital, but developed septicaemia and, two months short of her 50th birthday, died.

Melbourne personality and columnist Barry Everingham knew Lady Tryon well and remains saddened by her circumstances.

He described her as a typical Australian girl of her class. She was not part of the Melbourne establishment, but the Harper family was solid and she was raised in a loving, caring environment.

"In England she was known as Kanga because she never lost her Australian-ness,'' she said.

"Princess Michael of Kent, on the other hand, is as Australian as blow flies, but she doesn't even talk about it any more.''

Everingham is certain Lady Tryon was very much in love with Prince Charles and believes their relationship had an effect on her declining health.

"It was an absolute tragedy,'' he said.

"She suffered grievously in the later years.

"Her break-up with Prince Charles may not have been the cause for her demise, but it didn't help. She had a broken heart.''

She had been very famous, but, in the end, Kanga's celebrity proved to be so short-lived. Maybe Britain had had enough grieving.

Princess Diana died some three months earlier. You could say there were no tears left.

Certainly, it's likely that Prince Charles had few to spare for his former mistress, for in those last dog-days, Kanga had gone a little bit crazy.

Diana's death triggered angry accusations against Camilla and Charles's reputation was in danger of going down with hers. The Prince needed Kanga like a cat needs a dog.

Tragically for her, it was at precisely this time that she became increasingly obsessed by him.

On one occasion, in July 1997, she was seen, at a polo match at Tidworth, furiously pursuing her former lover in her wheelchair.

The Prince publicly snubbed her, but to Sarah Miles, Kanga declared, "I am going to be Queen of England''.

And so, on November 15, 1997, the once lovable, gorgeous Lady Tryon went to her lonely death: not a queen, no longer even married to a peer, and homeless.


http://thepeerage.com/p4703.htm#i47026


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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TonyGosling wrote:
here's the story sp, from
http://www.911forum.org.uk/board/viewtopic.php?p=159435#159435

I know Tony had an article here about the strange suicide of Prince Charles' Florist's Husband.
I can't find the article. Perhaps Tony can find and link.

Here's another strange story...
I watched last night a TV program on Channel 4 (On Demand) about the life and death of Prince Charles' other Mistress, Dael Harper aka "Kanga" or Kanga Tyron (all the same person).
In the newspapers there is this article.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1076026/The-lonely-death-Cha rless-mistress.html
First of all the shocking revelation that Diana knew of BOTH of Charle's mistresses before her marriage!
Story of sordid going-ons and finally Kanga's multiple near death and fatal events...
http://www.911forum.org.uk/board/viewtopic.php?t=18152

TonyGosling wrote:
all extremely weird this
and Charles' beautful Cedar tree out the front of Highgrove has died.

Charles axes his Harley-riding florist... just weeks after her husband is found dead
By Nick Constable - Daily Mail - 26th September 2009
Prince Charles is at the centre of a row for axeing his personal florist just weeks after her husband died in an apparent suicide. Sarah Champier-Lowe has been made redundant from her post at Highgrove following what Royal sources have described as a ‘staffing review’. Friends say she has been left shocked by the decision, which comes ahead of next month’s inquest into husband David Lowe’s death.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1216364/Sarah-Champier-Lowe-ax ed-Prince-Charles-florist-florist--just-weeks-husband-dead.html

Husband of Prince Charles's florist 'killed himself because he thought she would leave him over debts'
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1219033/Husband-Prince-Charles s-florist-killed-thought-leave-him.html

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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 11, 2017 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gardener, 58, who died falling down 50ft well in garden of her Grade II-listed home worked for Prince Charles at Highgrove
Irina Nadiotis, 58, fell down a 50ft well to her death in her Tetbury garden
Was described as being a 'cherished member of the team' at Highgrove
Highgrove House has been country home of Prince Charles for 36 years
Mrs Nadiotis is thought to have been stuck in the hole for up to two hours
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3594713/Gardener-58-died-falli ng-50ft-garden-Grade-II-listed-home-worked-Prince-Charles-Highgrove.ht ml

By Thomas Burrows for MailOnline

Published: 13:30, 17 May 2016 | Updated: 13:39, 17 May 2016


Irina Nadiotis, 58, (pictured) is thought to have been stuck in the 50ft-deep hole for up to two hours in the courtyard garden of the house in Tetbury

A woman who fell down a fifty foot well to her death in the garden of her Grade II-listed home worked for Prince Charles at Highgrove.

Irina Nadiotis, 58, a mother-of-two, is thought to have been stuck in the 50ft-deep hole for up to two hours in the courtyard garden of the property she had only recently moved in to with her family, according to neighbours.

The 17th century home at Tetbury, Gloucestershire, used to be divided into flats but renovation work had been taking place over the past year to turn the Cotswold stone townhouse back into a family home.

The 500,000 property, which is thought to have recently been completed, is just over a mile from Highgrove House, the country home of Prince Charles.

Mrs Nadiotis was described as being a 'cherished' member of staff at Highgrove.

Christine Prescott, CEO of Highgrove Enterprises, said: 'We are deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Irena Nadiotis, who was a cherished member of our team.'

Paramedics and fire crews were called out at 5.45pm on Saturday and firemen recovered the victim's body from the well.

Mrs Nadiotis was said by friends to have been a keen dressage rider.

She was divorced from her Greek Cypriot husband and had recently recovered from cancer.
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A former neighbour in Startley, Wiltshire, said she moved away about 18 months ago and added: 'She was a nice positive woman. She had a very strong character. She was always pleasant when you saw her, a really English country woman.'

'She bought the house in Tetbury to do it up. She had brilliant style and taste and always kept her home very nice. She was great in the garden. What a terrible thing to happen.'

Trevor Marsh, a friend of Mrs Nadiotis, who lived in the same house 16 years ago, said he had 'absolutely no idea' there was a well under the garden at all.


Prince Charles, second left, in his Highgrove House - one of the staff there has died after getting stuck in a well


Charles has owned Highgrove House since 1980, having bought it from Maurice Macmillan, a Conservative MP and son of the former Prime Minister Harold Macmillan


The gardens around the house are Charles' particular passion and the prince can regularly be found with his hands in the earth, weeding, pruning and planting

A neighbour, who did not want to be named, said: 'There was a young man in his twenties who was very upset. I think it might have been his mum who passed away.

'We looked out of our window at about 8.30pm and saw the body being taken into a private ambulance. It was awful.

'We were told that she was doing her garden and she just fell. I don't know if she knew the well was there or not. One minute she was gardening and the next she was gone.'

Locals said a number of the older homes in Tetbury, which is famous for its antiques shops, have wells in their gardens.

Stephen Hirst, a member of the town council, said: 'There are lots of properties in the old part of Tetbury which have wells because there are underground streams passing beneath the old town.

'In the days before plumbing and water systems, people would access their water directly via the wells.'

He added: 'What happened is very sad indeed. When it happened they called in lots of specialists.

'They had to call in the rope rescue squad from the Forest of Dean. They were very quick in attending, but sadly it was too late.'

Sarah Adam, a neighbour, said Mrs Nadiotis had lifted a large stone in her garden to put down a plastic sheet to lay stones on when she discovered the well 'unbeknownst to anyone'.

A spokesman for Gloucestershire Police said: 'The death is not being treated as suspicious. The coroner has been informed.'


She was pulled from the hole at her home in Church Street, Tetbury (pictured) in Gloucestershire, two hours after she fell down it on Saturday

Emma Jones, 40, a Salvation Army officer from Stroud, who was visiting a friend nearby for the weekend, said: 'There were seven ambulances, two or three police cars and a helicopter.

'We have been praying for her and her family.

'Our thoughts are with them. They must be devastated.'

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www.mp911truth.org
www.ae911truth.org
www.rl911truth.org
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www.v911t.org
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www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
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