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Oxford's elite Bullingdon Club - The Bully boys
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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Thu May 06, 2010 6:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Echos of the Skull and Bones here


Independent wrote:
But what about Ewen Fergusson? He's a partner at the City law firm, Herbert Smith. Or Sebastian Grigg, a partner and managing director at Goldman Sachs? Or Sebastian James, a well-known entrepreneur and son of Lord Northbourne. Yesterday, most of the picture's subjects refused to return calls. But one, who was speaking on condition of anonymity, offered The Independent a fascinating insight into the undergraduates who joined Oxford's most famous drinking club in 1987.

The Buller, as it is known to members, was founded in the 19th century as a hunting and cricket club, but is now devoted to drink and dining. Membership is by invitation only and normally limited to alumni of leading public schools. New recruits are secretly elected before being informed of their good fortune by having their college bedroom invaded by way of a window and methodically "trashed".

The club's notorious dinners typically involve members booking a private dining room (under an assumed name) and drinking themselves silly before destroying it elaborately. They wear royal blue tailcoats with ivory lapels, and - having made merry - pride themselves in politely paying the restaurant's owners compensation in high-denomination banknotes. One former Bullingdon member, the journalist Harry Mount, has recalled "being rolled down a hill by a Hungarian count". Boris Johnson once admitted to "dark deeds involving plastic cones and letterboxes".

Yet the "high jinks" that took place on the night the photo was taken (at Canterbury Quad, Christchurch) are up there with the best of them. At some point after the dinner, the group walked through Oxford when one (thought to be Fergusson, though exact recollections differ) threw a plant pot through the window of a restaurant.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/camerons-cronies-the-bul lingdon-clubs-class-of-87-436192.html

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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Wed May 12, 2010 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Most of the names are here - a comprehensive job done

The Bullingdon Club
http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2010/03/14/the-bullingdon-club/

I don’t usually made political predictions, but if there is one reason David Cameron might lose the General Election, it is the above photo–a picture taken in 1987 at Brasenose College, Oxford which Cameron attended. Although the Labour party accused him of being a member of a secret society, the Bullingdon Club, is far from a secret society. Immortalized as the Bollinger Club by Evelyn Waugh in 'Decline and Fall', the Buller usually make its presence known by throwing exclusive yet rambunctious parties.



Above,

(1) the Hon. Edward Sebastian Grigg, the heir to Baron Altrincham of Tormarton and current chairman of Credit Suisse (UK)

(2) David Cameron

(3) Ralph Perry Robinson, a former child actor, designer, furniture-maker

(4) Ewen Fergusson, son of the British ambassador to France, Sir Ewen Fergusson and now at City law firm Herbert Smith

(5) Matthew Benson, the heir to the Earldom of Wemyss and March

(6) Sebastian James, the son of Lord Northbourne, a major landowner in Kent

(7) Jonathan Ford, the-then president of the club, a banker with Morgan Grenfell

(8) Boris Johnson, the-then president of the Oxford Union, now Lord Mayor of London

9) Harry Eastwood, the investment fund consultant



In the photo taken in 1992, there are eight famous faces:

(1) George Osborne, now the Shadow Chancellor;

(2) writer Harry Mount, the heir to the Baronetcy of Wasing and Mr. Cameron’s cousin;

(3) Chris Coleridge, the descendant of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the son of Lloyds’ chairman David Coleridge, the brother of Conde Nast managing director Nicholas Coleridge

(4) German aristocrat and managing consultant Baron Lupus von Maltzahn,

(5) the late Mark Petre, the heir to the Barony of Petre;

(6) Australian millionaire Peter Holmes a Cour;

(7) Nat Rothschild, the heir to the Barons Rothschilds and co-founder of a racy student paper with Harry Mount

(8) Jason Gissing, the chairman of Ocado supermarkets.

Two figures on left of (6) and (7) were blacked out before the photo was released, causing wild allegations. Their identities are yet unknown. My top contenders (based on the influence in the City, the Athenaeum and their Oxford prominence) include:

(1) the Hon. Michael Gove, Shadow Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families, former president of the Oxford Union and “one-man think-tank”

(2) the Hon. Adam Bruce, the son of the Earl of Elgin and incumbent Unicorn Pursuivant of Arms

(3) the Hon. Edward Vaizey, the son of Lord Vaizey and the Shadow Minister for Culture

(4) the founder of Think Tank Policy Exchange, and conservative activist Nicholas Boles

(5) Steven Hilton, the director of strategy for Cameron and godfather of Cameron’s children

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Last edited by TonyGosling on Fri Apr 24, 2015 10:42 am; edited 1 time in total
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Caz
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

How they see everyone else:

from G K Chesterton 'Heretics'

http://www.scribd.com/doc/32312908/Heretics-by-Chesterton-Chapter-19-l ike-an-Adelphi-play
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This scribd page just comes up blank for me.
It's a horrible site.
Could you find a better link and copy/paste some text to explain what you mean please?

Caz wrote:
How they see everyone else:
from G K Chesterton 'Heretics'
http://www.scribd.com/doc/32312908/Heretics-by-Chesterton-Chapter-19-l ike-an-Adelphi-play

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www.mp911truth.org
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http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
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Caz
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 01, 2010 1:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's here:

http://www.online-literature.com/chesterton/heretics/19/


Quote:
Odd ideas are entertained in our time about the real nature of the doctrine of human fraternity. The real doctrine is something which we do not, with all our modern humanitarianism, very clearly understand, much less very closely practise. There is nothing, for instance, particularly undemocratic about kicking your butler downstairs. It may be wrong, but it is not unfraternal. In a certain sense, the blow or kick may be considered as a confession of equality: you are meeting your butler body to body; you are almost according him the privilege of the duel. There is nothing, undemocratic, though there may be something unreasonable, in expecting a great deal from the butler, and being filled with a kind of frenzy of surprise when he falls short of the divine stature. The thing which is really undemocratic and unfraternal is not to expect the butler to be more or less divine. The thing which is really undemocratic and unfraternal is to say, as so many modern humanitarians say, "Of course one must make allowances for those on a lower plane." All things considered indeed, it may be said, without undue exaggeration, that the really undemocratic and unfraternal thing is the common practice of not kicking the butler downstairs.

It is only because such a vast section of the modern world is out of sympathy with the serious democratic sentiment that this statement will seem to many to be lacking in seriousness. Democracy is not philanthropy; it is not even altruism or social reform. Democracy is not founded on pity for the common man; democracy is founded on reverence for the common man, or, if you will, even on fear of him. It does not champion man because man is so miserable, but because man is so sublime. It does not object so much to the ordinary man being a slave as to his not being a king, for its dream is always the dream of the first Roman republic, a nation of kings.

Next to a genuine republic, the most democratic thing in the world is a hereditary despotism. I mean a despotism in which there is absolutely no trace whatever of any nonsense about intellect or special fitness for the post. Rational despotism--that is, selective despotism--is always a curse to mankind, because with that you have the ordinary man misunderstood and misgoverned by some prig who has no brotherly respect for him at all. But irrational despotism is always democratic, because it is the ordinary man enthroned. The worst form of slavery is that which is called Caesarism, or the choice of some bold or brilliant man as despot because he is suitable. For that means that men choose a representative, not because he represents them, but because he does not. Men trust an ordinary man like George III or William IV. because they are themselves ordinary men and understand him. Men trust an ordinary man because they trust themselves. But men trust a great man because they do not trust themselves. And hence the worship of great men always appears in times of weakness and cowardice; we never hear of great men until the time when all other men are small.

Hereditary despotism is, then, in essence and sentiment democratic because it chooses from mankind at random. If it does not declare that every man may rule, it declares the next most democratic thing; it declares that any man may rule. Hereditary aristocracy is a far worse and more dangerous thing, because the numbers and multiplicity of an aristocracy make it sometimes possible for it to figure as an aristocracy of intellect. Some of its members will presumably have brains, and thus they, at any rate, will be an intellectual aristocracy within the social one. They will rule the aristocracy by virtue of their intellect, and they will rule the country by virtue of their aristocracy. Thus a double falsity will be set up, and millions of the images of God, who, fortunately for their wives and families, are neither gentlemen nor clever men, will be represented by a man like Mr. Balfour or Mr. Wyndham, because he is too gentlemanly to be called merely clever, and just too clever to be called merely a gentleman. But even an hereditary aristocracy may exhibit, by a sort of accident, from time to time some of the basically democratic quality which belongs to a hereditary despotism. It is amusing to think how much conservative ingenuity has been wasted in the defence of the House of Lords by men who were desperately endeavouring to prove that the House of Lords consisted of clever men. There is one really good defence of the House of Lords, though admirers of the peerage are strangely coy about using it; and that is, that the House of Lords, in its full and proper strength, consists of stupid men. It really would be a plausible defence of that otherwise indefensible body to point out that the clever men in the Commons, who owed their power to cleverness, ought in the last resort to be checked by the average man in the Lords, who owed their power to accident. Of course, there would be many answers to such a contention, as, for instance, that the House of Lords is largely no longer a House of Lords, but a House of tradesmen and financiers, or that the bulk of the commonplace nobility do not vote, and so leave the chamber to the prigs and the specialists and the mad old gentlemen with hobbies. But on some occasions the House of Lords, even under all these disadvantages, is in some sense representative. When all the peers flocked together to vote against Mr. Gladstone's second Home Rule Bill, for instance, those who said that the peers represented the English people, were perfectly right. All those dear old men who happened to be born peers were at that moment, and upon that question, the precise counterpart of all the dear old men who happened to be born paupers or middle-class gentlemen. That mob of peers did really represent the English people--that is to say, it was honest, ignorant, vaguely excited, almost unanimous, and obviously wrong. Of course, rational democracy is better as an expression of the public will than the haphazard hereditary method. While we are about having any kind of democracy, let it be rational democracy. But if we are to have any kind of oligarchy, let it be irrational oligarchy. Then at least we shall be ruled by men.

But the thing which is really required for the proper working of democracy is not merely the democratic system, or even the democratic philosophy, but the democratic emotion. The democratic emotion, like most elementary and indispensable things, is a thing difficult to describe at any time. But it is peculiarly difficult to describe it in our enlightened age, for the simple reason that it is peculiarly difficult to find it. It is a certain instinctive attitude which feels the things in which all men agree to be unspeakably important, and all the things in which they differ (such as mere brains) to be almost unspeakably unimportant. The nearest approach to it in our ordinary life would be the promptitude with which we should consider mere humanity in any circumstance of shock or death. We should say, after a somewhat disturbing discovery, "There is a dead man under the sofa." We should not be likely to say, "There is a dead man of considerable personal refinement under the sofa." We should say, "A woman has fallen into the water." We should not say, "A highly educated woman has fallen into the water." Nobody would say, "There are the remains of a clear thinker in your back garden." Nobody would say, "Unless you hurry up and stop him, a man with a very fine ear for music will have jumped off that cliff." But this emotion, which all of us have in connection with such things as birth and death, is to some people native and constant at all ordinary times and in all ordinary places. It was native to St. Francis of Assisi. It was native to Walt Whitman. In this strange and splendid degree it cannot be expected, perhaps, to pervade a whole commonwealth or a whole civilization; but one commonwealth may have it much more than another commonwealth, one civilization much more than another civilization. No community, perhaps, ever had it so much as the early Franciscans. No community, perhaps, ever had it so little as ours.

Everything in our age has, when carefully examined, this fundamentally undemocratic quality. In religion and morals we should admit, in the abstract, that the sins of the educated classes were as great as, or perhaps greater than, the sins of the poor and ignorant. But in practice the great difference between the mediaeval ethics and ours is that ours concentrate attention on the sins which are the sins of the ignorant, and practically deny that the sins which are the sins of the educated are sins at all. We are always talking about the sin of intemperate drinking, because it is quite obvious that the poor have it more than the rich. But we are always denying that there is any such thing as the sin of pride, because it would be quite obvious that the rich have it more than the poor. We are always ready to make a saint or prophet of the educated man who goes into cottages to give a little kindly advice to the uneducated. But the medieval idea of a saint or prophet was something quite different. The mediaeval saint or prophet was an uneducated man who walked into grand houses to give a little kindly advice to the educated. The old tyrants had enough insolence to despoil the poor, but they had not enough insolence to preach to them. It was the gentleman who oppressed the slums; but it was the slums that admonished the gentleman. And just as we are undemocratic in faith and morals, so we are, by the very nature of our attitude in such matters, undemocratic in the tone of our practical politics. It is a sufficient proof that we are not an essentially democratic state that we are always wondering what we shall do with the poor. If we were democrats, we should be wondering what the poor will do with us. With us the governing class is always saying to itself, "What laws shall we make?" In a purely democratic state it would be always saying, "What laws can we obey?" A purely democratic state perhaps there has never been. But even the feudal ages were in practice thus far democratic, that every feudal potentate knew that any laws which he made would in all probability return upon himself. His feathers might be cut off for breaking a sumptuary law. His head might be cut off for high treason. But the modern laws are almost always laws made to affect the governed class, but not the governing. We have public-house licensing laws, but not sumptuary laws. That is to say, we have laws against the festivity and hospitality of the poor, but no laws against the festivity and hospitality of the rich. We have laws against blasphemy--that is, against a kind of coarse and offensive speaking in which nobody but a rough and obscure man would be likely to indulge. But we have no laws against heresy--that is, against the intellectual poisoning of the whole people, in which only a prosperous and prominent man would be likely to be successful. The evil of aristocracy is not that it necessarily leads to the infliction of bad things or the suffering of sad ones; the evil of aristocracy is that it places everything in the hands of a class of people who can always inflict what they can never suffer. Whether what they inflict is, in their intention, good or bad, they become equally frivolous. The case against the governing class of modern England is not in the least that it is selfish; if you like, you may call the English oligarchs too fantastically unselfish. The case against them simply is that when they legislate for all men, they always omit themselves.

We are undemocratic, then, in our religion, as is proved by our efforts to "raise" the poor. We are undemocratic in our government, as is proved by our innocent attempt to govern them well. But above all we are undemocratic in our literature, as is proved by the torrent of novels about the poor and serious studies of the poor which pour from our publishers every month. And the more "modern" the book is the more certain it is to be devoid of democratic sentiment.

A poor man is a man who has not got much money. This may seem a simple and unnecessary description, but in the face of a great mass of modern fact and fiction, it seems very necessary indeed; most of our realists and sociologists talk about a poor man as if he were an octopus or an alligator. There is no more need to study the psychology of poverty than to study the psychology of bad temper, or the psychology of vanity, or the psychology of animal spirits. A man ought to know something of the emotions of an insulted man, not by being insulted, but simply by being a man. And he ought to know something of the emotions of a poor man, not by being poor, but simply by being a man. Therefore, in any writer who is describing poverty, my first objection to him will be that he has studied his subject. A democrat would have imagined it.

A great many hard things have been said about religious slumming and political or social slumming, but surely the most despicable of all is artistic slumming. The religious teacher is at least supposed to be interested in the costermonger because he is a man; the politician is in some dim and perverted sense interested in the costermonger because he is a citizen; it is only the wretched writer who is interested in the costermonger merely because he is a costermonger. Nevertheless, so long as he is merely seeking impressions, or in other words copy, his trade, though dull, is honest. But when he endeavours to represent that he is describing the spiritual core of a costermonger, his dim vices and his delicate virtues, then we must object that his claim is preposterous; we must remind him that he is a journalist and nothing else. He has far less psychological authority even than the foolish missionary. For he is in the literal and derivative sense a journalist, while the missionary is an eternalist. The missionary at least pretends to have a version of the man's lot for all time; the journalist only pretends to have a version of it from day to day. The missionary comes to tell the poor man that he is in the same condition with all men. The journalist comes to tell other people how different the poor man is from everybody else.

If the modern novels about the slums, such as novels of Mr. Arthur Morrison, or the exceedingly able novels of Mr. Somerset Maugham, are intended to be sensational, I can only say that that is a noble and reasonable object, and that they attain it. A sensation, a shock to the imagination, like the contact with cold water, is always a good and exhilarating thing; and, undoubtedly, men will always seek this sensation (among other forms) in the form of the study of the strange antics of remote or alien peoples. In the twelfth century men obtained this sensation by reading about dog-headed men in Africa. In the twentieth century they obtained it by reading about pig-headed Boers in Africa. The men of the twentieth century were certainly, it must be admitted, somewhat the more credulous of the two. For it is not recorded of the men in the twelfth century that they organized a sanguinary crusade solely for the purpose of altering the singular formation of the heads of the Africans. But it may be, and it may even legitimately be, that since all these monsters have faded from the popular mythology, it is necessary to have in our fiction the image of the horrible and hairy East-ender, merely to keep alive in us a fearful and childlike wonder at external peculiarities. But the Middle Ages (with a great deal more common sense than it would now be fashionable to admit) regarded natural history at bottom rather as a kind of joke; they regarded the soul as very important. Hence, while they had a natural history of dog-headed men, they did not profess to have a psychology of dog-headed men. They did not profess to mirror the mind of a dog-headed man, to share his tenderest secrets, or mount with his most celestial musings. They did not write novels about the semi-canine creature, attributing to him all the oldest morbidities and all the newest fads. It is permissible to present men as monsters if we wish to make the reader jump; and to make anybody jump is always a Christian act. But it is not permissible to present men as regarding themselves as monsters, or as making themselves jump. To summarize, our slum fiction is quite defensible as aesthetic fiction; it is not defensible as spiritual fact.

One enormous obstacle stands in the way of its actuality. The men who write it, and the men who read it, are men of the middle classes or the upper classes; at least, of those who are loosely termed the educated classes. Hence, the fact that it is the life as the refined man sees it proves that it cannot be the life as the unrefined man lives it. Rich men write stories about poor men, and describe them as speaking with a coarse, or heavy, or husky enunciation. But if poor men wrote novels about you or me they would describe us as speaking with some absurd shrill and affected voice, such as we only hear from a duchess in a three-act farce. The slum novelist gains his whole effect by the fact that some detail is strange to the reader; but that detail by the nature of the case cannot be strange in itself. It cannot be strange to the soul which he is professing to study. The slum novelist gains his effects by describing the same grey mist as draping the dingy factory and the dingy tavern. But to the man he is supposed to be studying there must be exactly the same difference between the factory and the tavern that there is to a middle-class man between a late night at the office and a supper at Pagani's. The slum novelist is content with pointing out that to the eye of his particular class a pickaxe looks dirty and a pewter pot looks dirty. But the man he is supposed to be studying sees the difference between them exactly as a clerk sees the difference between a ledger and an edition deluxe. The chiaroscuro of the life is inevitably lost; for to us the high lights and the shadows are a light grey. But the high lights and the shadows are not a light grey in that life any more than in any other. The kind of man who could really express the pleasures of the poor would be also the kind of man who could share them. In short, these books are not a record of the psychology of poverty. They are a record of the psychology of wealth and culture when brought in contact with poverty. They are not a description of the state of the slums. They are only a very dark and dreadful description of the state of the slummers. One might give innumerable examples of the essentially unsympathetic and unpopular quality of these realistic writers. But perhaps the simplest and most obvious example with which we could conclude is the mere fact that these writers are realistic. The poor have many other vices, but, at least, they are never realistic. The poor are melodramatic and romantic in grain; the poor all believe in high moral platitudes and copy-book maxims; probably this is the ultimate meaning of the great saying, "Blessed are the poor." Blessed are the poor, for they are always making life, or trying to make life like an Adelphi play. Some innocent educationalists and philanthropists (for even philanthropists can be innocent) have expressed a grave astonishment that the masses prefer shilling shockers to scientific treatises and melodramas to problem plays. The reason is very simple. The realistic story is certainly more artistic than the melodramatic story. If what you desire is deft handling, delicate proportions, a unit of artistic atmosphere, the realistic story has a full advantage over the melodrama. In everything that is light and bright and ornamental the realistic story has a full advantage over the melodrama. But, at least, the melodrama has one indisputable advantage over the realistic story. The melodrama is much more like life. It is much more like man, and especially the poor man. It is very banal and very inartistic when a poor woman at the Adelphi says, "Do you think I will sell my own child?" But poor women in the Battersea High Road do say, "Do you think I will sell my own child?" They say it on every available occasion; you can hear a sort of murmur or babble of it all the way down the street. It is very stale and weak dramatic art (if that is all) when the workman confronts his master and says, "I'm a man." But a workman does say "I'm a man" two or three times every day. In fact, it is tedious, possibly, to hear poor men being melodramatic behind the footlights; but that is because one can always hear them being melodramatic in the street outside. In short, melodrama, if it is dull, is dull because it is too accurate. Somewhat the same problem exists in the case of stories about schoolboys. Mr. Kipling's "Stalky and Co." is much more amusing (if you are talking about amusement) than the late Dean Farrar's "Eric; or, Little by Little." But "Eric" is immeasurably more like real school-life. For real school-life, real boyhood, is full of the things of which Eric is full--priggishness, a crude piety, a silly sin, a weak but continual attempt at the heroic, in a word, melodrama. And if we wish to lay a firm basis for any efforts to help the poor, we must not become realistic and see them from the outside. We must become melodramatic, and see them from the inside. The novelist must not take out his notebook and say, "I a man expert." No; he must imitate the workman in the Adelphi play. He must slap himself on the chest and say, "I am a man."


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 08, 2010 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Top Whitehall job for Prime Minister's Bullingdon club chum
By Gerri Peev -- 6th July 2010


College chums: Sebastian James will review state school spending

A schoolmate of David Cameron - and fellow ex-member of the Bullingdon dining club - has been picked for a Whitehall job reviewing state school spending.
Sebastian James, 44, who was at Eton with the Prime Minister, will examine how schools spend money on facilities.
Schools Secretary Michael Gove announced the appointment yesterday. Mr James will be joined by other leading figures from academia and business...............

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1292383/Top-Whitehall-job-Prim e-Ministers-Bullingdon-chum.html

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 30, 2010 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This weekend's London West End Theatre guide
Brought to you from the independent city-state of Bristol, UK.

Introducing the latest in a long run of national political pantomimes: populist maverick against political insider or Bullingdon Club vs. Bullingdon Club?

Boris Johnson vs David Cameron: populist maverick against political insider
By Andrew Gimson - Daily Telegraph - Friday 29 Oct 2010
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/borisjohnson/8097063/Boris- Johnson-vs-David-Cameron-populist-maverick-against-political-insider.h tml

Boris Johnson knew exactly what he was doing when he said he would
not accept "any kind of Kosovo-style social cleansing of London".
Above all, he was demonstrating that he is the only senior elected
Conservative who is prepared to stand up to David Cameron.

The Bullingdon Club photographs
http://iconicphotos.wordpress.com/2010/03/14/the-bullingdon-club/
The pictures were withdrawn from circulation as the Oxford-based
company Gillman and Soame, which own the copyright, was persuaded to
withhold the further permission to show the picture. Mr. Cameron has
since shown embarrassment for his association with the Bullers but
these photos could easily have tipped the outcome of the close
election. The Brits are still conscious about a classless society:
although most of the British prime ministers hail from Eton-Harrow,
Oxbridge circles, there still deep animosity towards elites. Douglas
Hurd, Margaret Thatcher's Foreign Secretary, wrote: "If I had not
gone to Eton I would have become Prime Minister in 1990." During the
Tory leadership contest in 2005, David Cameron was discounted because
he was an Old Etonian, a name Gordon Brown throws at him usually
these days. John Prescott called the conservative front-bench an
"Eton mafia," while a lot of influential journalists (outside of
Murdoch circle) are dismissed of the old school ties too. [In fact
Mr. Cameron is descended from an illegitimate child of William IV and
his wife from an illegitimate child of Charles II by Nell Gwynn].

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 22, 2011 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bullingdon Club bully in punch-up with ex-girlfriend's black friend
Leading member of Oxford's Bullingdon Club in punch-up with ex-girlfriend's new admirer
By Sam Greenhill and Andy Dolan - Daily Mail - 21st February 2011
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1358973/Nick-Green-leading-mem ber-Oxfords-Bullingdon-Club-involved-punch-ex-girlfriends-new-admirer. html
A leading light of the notorious Bullingdon Club at Oxford University has been detained by police after an alleged assault on a fellow student in a row over a girl.
Witnesses said Old Etonian Nick Green, wearing the dining club’s trademark £1,200 tailcoat, was led away in handcuffs following the fracas outside a nightclub.
The alleged victim, Etiene Ekpoutip, was so seriously injured that an ambulance took him to the city’s John Radcliffe hospital.
Police ordered medics to stand back until it was safe for them to enter the street to treat the 22-year-old.
Mr Green, a friend of Princess Beatrice, was not arrested or charged with any offence. Police said the alleged victim did not want to take the matter further.
Mr Green and Mr Ekpoutip were said to have fallen out last Friday over the affections of student Miranda Gilbert, who is in her fourth year of Russian studies at University College.
A friend of 22-year-old Miss Gilbert said: ‘Nick is Miranda’s ex-boyfriend. They dated in the first year, but she broke it off.
‘Since then, he has kept on at her, and he was not happy when she started a friendship with Etiene.’
Mr Green – who declares himself a Facebook fan of his Bullingdon Club predecessors David Cameron and Boris Johnson – is in his fourth year studying engineering at the same college as Miss Gilbert.
A university source claimed: ‘On Thursday night, there was a big club night in Oxford. Nick Green was with his Bullingdon friends and went up to his ex-girlfriend and they had a big disagreement. Inside the club, threats were made to the victim.’
Tensions continued outside, with Mr Ekpoutip allegedly being subjected to a verbal and physical assault.
At some point during the evening, the front window of Mr Green’s student house was smashed.
A neighbour reported being woken by ‘drunken shouting’ and said: ‘The police came and I saw a man being handcuffed and put into the back of the police car and then driven away. He was a posh boy, wearing a long elegant-looking jacket.’
He and another neighbour identified the handcuffed man as South African Mr Green, whose divorced parents live in London and America.
A fellow student said: ‘He’s well known for his involvement with the Bullingdon Club. They turn up at bars and clubs around the city and take over the VIP areas, throwing champagne around. It’s pathetic.’
Another student said: ‘He’s not the most well-liked of students. When we’re out in nightclubs, he’ll think nothing of barging his way through the queues to the bar as if he owns the place.’
In 2009, Mr Green featured among the ‘200 sexiest singles’ in society magazine Tatler’s annual ‘Little Black Book’, which said of him: ‘Oxford engineering undergrad who wears snakeskin Speedos while on the Zambezi river, we hear. This cupid is a great shot with a bow and arrow.’
Mr Ekpoutip, a former prefect at Haberdashers’ Aske’s Boys School in Hertfordshire, is at Pembroke College. In 2009, he modelled for Oxford fashion week, and starred as Romeo in a student productions of Romeo and Juliet.
Over the weekend, Mr Green engaged an expensive firm of media lawyers. However last night they offered no comment from him, apart from to confirm his membership of the Bullingdon Club.
Mr Ekpoutip declined to comment beyond saying he ‘cannot confirm or deny any alleged incident’.
The Bullingdon Club achieved notoriety over its privileged members trashing restaurants and leaving large sums of cash to pay for the damage.
Other former members include Chancellor George Osborne and Earl Spencer.
Additional reporting Eleanor Harding and Kate Loveys
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1358973/Nick-Green-leading-mem ber-Oxfords-Bullingdon-Club-involved-punch-ex-girlfriends-new-admirer. html

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dave’s holiday chum? His old friend from the Bullingdon Club joins PM in luxury Tuscan villa
David Cameron was staying at a £10,000-a-week villa in Italy with a friend from the exclusive but controversial Bullingdon dining club when he had to return early to deal with the London riots.
Fellow Old Etonian Sebastian James and his family shared the luxury 15-bedroom villa in fashionable Tuscany with the Prime Minister, his wife Samantha, their three children and another unnamed couple.
Mr James – whose full name is the Right Hon Sebastian Richard Edward Cuthbert James – is the son of hereditary peer and landowning aristocrat Lord Northbourne. After Eton, he went to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was invited to join the notorious ‘Buller’, as it is known.
Now 44, he appears alongside Mr Cameron and London Mayor Boris Johnson in a photograph of the club’s members in 1987.



Membership of the elite drinking and dining club was by invitation only and limited to boys from top public schools. They would routinely drink to excess and trash restaurants before paying for the repairs.
Until recently, Mr James – the group operations director of Dixons owner DSG International – lived in a £4.5 million house in Notting Hill, West London, close to the Camerons before they moved to No 10.
He and his wife Anna, who have two daughters, also have a property in Deal, Kent.
The Mail on Sunday can reveal that last Sunday night – as the riots turned London into a war zone – Mr Cameron, his wife Samantha, Mr and Mrs James and the other couple who shared their Tuscan holiday hideaway were dining out at a hilltop restaurant nearby.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2025792/Dave-s-holiday-chum-Hi s-old-friend-Bullingdon-Club-joins-PM-luxury-Tuscan-villa.html

Plundering toffs rule on their own terms
The Bullingdon is an ancient dining club for undergraduate toffs at Oxford, all male, by invitation only. You need pots of money to join, partly to fork out for the uniform of white tie'n'tails with trimmings, but mostly to pay for the property damage wrought at the club's notorious orgies of drinking and destruction.
The British Prime Minister, David William Donald Cameron (Eton, Brasenose), his Tory Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Gideon Oliver Osborne (St Paul's, Magdalen, and heir to a baronetcy), and the Tory mayor of London, the blond, bicycling and batty Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson (Eton, Balliol), were all Bullingdon chaps in the '80s.
A few years ago, in a glow of nostalgia, Johnson recalled an evening where a pot plant was heaved through a restaurant window and ''the party ended up with a number of us crawling on all fours through the hedges of the botanical gardens and trying to escape police dogs". The mayor remains a gilded creature, once famously dismissing his £250,000 stipend for writing a newspaper column as "chicken feed". Ho ho.
There, in a nutshell, you have Britain today. As ever, the Establishment rules by its own rules. Trashing a restaurant is a jolly wheeze for the upper classes. Plundering the life savings of the middle classes is all in a day's work for the bonus'n'Bollinger banking brigade in the City of London.
So, too, is tax dodging: to pluck just one small example out of the ether, Rupert Murdoch's London Sun newspaper and his loathsome but now defunct News of the World made a profit of £89 million in 2010 but, through various corporate pea and thimble tricks, paid just £415,000 in tax.

http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/plundering-toffs-rule-on-their-own-terms -20110812-1iqmu.html


In 1987, while a student at Oxford, the future prime minister had been part of a 'raucous evening' involving the 10-strong 'Bullingdon Club'.
Hours after they had posed for a photograph in matching top hats and tails, they were chased by police through the city streets after a pot had been thrown through a restaurant window.
While others spent a night in the cells, Cameron and Boris Johnson - now mayor of London - made good their escapes.
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/opinion/news-analysis/rolling-back-t he-state-only-fans-the-flames-16037110.html


'An excessive sense of entitlement" was what the mayor of London ascribed to those looting their way across our sceptred isle – but he could have been referring to himself. In the mid-to-late 80s, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson – not to mention David Cameron and his now chancellor George Osborne – were members of the notorious Bullingdon Club, the Oxford university "dining" clique that smashed their way through restaurant crockery, car windscreens and antique violins all over the city of knowledge.
Not unlike a certain section of today's youth, the "Bullers" have little regard for property. Prospective members often have their rooms trashed by their new-found friends, while the club has a reputation for ritualistic plate-smashing at unsuspecting country pubs. It has been banned from several establishments, while contemporary Bullers are said to chant, at all hours: "Buller, Buller, Buller! Buller, Buller, Buller! We are the famous Bullingdon Club, and we don't give a *!"
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/aug/10/uk-riots-boris-johnson


All three have known each other since university and were all members of The Bullingdon Club, a group of wealthy students who, rather like Inspector Clouseau, specialised in destroying every building they entered. Their chosen method was to find a rural pub or restaurant, book under an assumed name, turn up, get rip-roaringly drunk and then trash the place. A couple of days later, they would flash the cash and buy their way out of trouble.
The club has been doing this since it was formed, some 200 years ago.
Describing their antics on a typical night out, David Cameron said, in 1986: “Things got out of hand and we’d had a few drinks. We smashed the place up and Boris set fire to the toilets.” Such was the behaviour of today’s Prime Minister, London Mayor and the Chancellor of the Exchequer.
All three have known each other since university and were all members of The Bullingdon Club, a group of wealthy students who, rather like Inspector Clouseau, specialised in destroying every building they entered. Their chosen method was to find a rural pub or restaurant, book under an assumed name, turn up, get rip-roaringly drunk and then trash the place. A couple of days later, they would flash the cash and buy their way out of trouble.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

TonyGosling wrote:

Describing their antics on a typical night out, David Cameron said, in 1986: “Things got out of hand and we’d had a few drinks. We smashed the place up and Boris set fire to the toilets.”


Set fire...

When an ex-CIA agent was in charge of the London Underground we had bombs going off in it for the first time in its history.
When Boris became London Mayor we had buildings being firebombed...
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 4:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David Cameron quizzed on Radio 4 this morning!

Link
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SaZUYa5r28

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2011 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dominatrix Discusses Old Sex And Cocaine Habit Of The UK Chancellor
http://www.businessinsider.com/natalie-rowe-discusses-george-osbornes- cocaine-habit2011-9

George Osborne: from the Bullingdon club to the heart of government
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/oct/01/george-osborne-bullingd on-club-government

George Osborne and the Bullingdon club: what the chancellor saw
This article is the subject of a legal complaint made on behalf of Nathaniel Rothschild.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/oct/01/george-osborne-bullingd on-club-chancellor
New revelations have emerged about the notorious Oxford club, including claims of fist fights, cocaine and trashed restaurants
Elizabeth Day - guardian.co.uk, Saturday 1 October 2011 13.56 BST
The chancellor of the exchequer endeavours to present a sober and serious image as a man who can steer us through crisis. But it seems that George Osborne was not always so buttoned up.
Details have emerged of Osborne's wild university days as a member of the notorious Bullingdon Club. The all-male dining club, to which prime minister David Cameron also belonged as an undergraduate, is open only to sons of aristocratic families or the super-rich and is famed for its riotous behaviour. A 1992 photograph of Osborne in tie and tails with his fellow members, including multimillionaire financier Nat Rothschild, has been much reproduced.
Osborne, who belonged to the Bullingdon while studying modern history at Magdalen College, Oxford, in the early 1990s, has never spoken in detail of what he got up to as a member, preferring to draw a veil over his youthful antics. But in an interview with the Observer Magazine, one of Osborne's Bullingdon contemporaries has spoken for the first time about some of the astonishing escapades to which the future chancellor bore witness. They include an alcohol-fuelled party that degenerated into a fist fight, allegations of cocaine use by another member of the club, and an evening during which the members trashed a Michelin-starred restaurant.
The contemporary, who asked not to be identified, said that on one evening in 1992, shortly after the famous photograph of Osborne was taken, the Bullingdon members boarded a double-decker bus to Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire, the Rothschild family seat.
"It started to get really out of control," he said. "I remember Nat [Rothschild] comatose on the lawn, being tended to by a butler who was applying cold towels to his forehead, trying to bring him round. One of the guys got into a fist fight because he was Italian and a football match was on and there'd been some racial taunting. Plates had been thrown. As usual, it escalated.
"I think George was mildly alarmed. He was enjoying the food and wine, enjoying watching the football, and I just remember him looking at me with raised eyebrows at what was going on. I never saw him take drugs."
Rothschild denies that the incidents took place.
On a different occasion, with Osborne also present, the source recalled one Bullingdon member trying to snort lines of coke on an open-top bus. "I said to him: 'You're stupid, it's blowing away', and his response was: 'I can afford it'."
On another occasion, Osborne and the Bullingdon went for a meal at a Michelin-starred restaurant in Berkshire where, coincidentally, the comedian Lenny Henry and his then wife, Dawn French, were having dinner. The source said: "A couple of the boys started getting obnoxious and talking about their family wealth and Lenny Henry said: 'Actually, sod off.' There was a slight altercation when a member put a cigar out on someone else's lapel and it turned into a fist fight and furniture was broken. It was horrible, horrible. We used to smash everything up then pay a cheque saying: 'It's OK, we can pay for it'."
Unlike many of his cabinet colleagues (including William Hague, a fellow Magdalen alumnus), there has never been any sense until now that Osborne was particularly involved in student politics. But the Observer can reveal that, as a 19-year-old, he did stand for the post of entertainments representative in his college junior common room. In fact, his electioneering was so enthusiastic that his rival for the position wrote a letter of complaint to the JCR vice-president outlining the future Conservative MP's underhand tactics. Dated 15 November 1990, the letter accuses Osborne of "electorate malpractice" on several counts including "the dissemination of five different wordings of posters, instead of the mandatory two" and "the attempt on the part of Mr George Osborne to pervert the democratic process by electioneering in the JCR".
It was written by Rupert Harding, who won the election. Harding, who now runs a language school in Finland, has little memory of the event. Contacted by the Observer, he said: "Perverting the democratic process I think meant going up to people after Neighbours and asking them to vote for him."
Although Osborne no doubt abandoned such dirty politics as soon as he was elected for Tatton in 2001, his friendship with Rothschild continues to this day. In October 2008, Rothschild claimed that Osborne had tried to solicit a £50,000 donation from the Russian aluminium magnate Oleg Deripaska while on Deripaska's yacht in Corfu along with Rothschild and Labour peer Lord Mandelson. Such a move would have been a violation of the law against political donations by foreign citizens.
A formal complaint was made to the Electoral Commission, which rejected the claims.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2011/oct/01/george-osborne-bullingd on-club-chancellor

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2012 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Something Bully like about last week's Tory fundraiser - looks like The Mail is the only paper to cover it at all.

'Strictly private' Tory ball auctions £55K shooting trips as Cameron takes a pot shot at Chris Huhne
By Brendan Carlin, Mail on Sunday Political Reporter
Last updated at 11:32 PM on 11th February 2012
David Cameron risked a rebuke from his own Government law chief after mocking Chris Huhne over his alleged speeding offence at a strictly private party for wealthy Tory donors.
The wisecracking Prime Minister persuaded donors to fund a Tory election war chest so he can rule without his Coalition partners in future with a series of barbs about the Liberal Democrats.
But he appeared to risk falling foul of contempt of court laws when he made a joke about the plight of Mr Huhne, who was forced to resign from the Cabinet after being charged with perverting the course of justice by allegedly using ex-wife Vicky Pryce to avoid a speeding fine.
Joking how he and wife Samantha had struggled to get to the fundraising bash, Mr Cameron said: ‘We were really worried we’d be late this evening. The traffic was terrible.
‘So we had to speed to get here on time. It’s a good job Samantha was driving – or at least, that’s what it says on the forms!’
Under contempt laws, it is an offence to suggest a person is guilty of a crime once they have been charged. The penalty for breaking this law includes jail. But experts said that while Mr Cameron may have flirted with a reprimand by Attorney General Dominic Grieve, his Huhne joke was not actionable.
One guest said: ‘It was very near the knuckle but it got a huge cheer and put everyone in the right mood for the auction.’
Stalking at Buckhurst Park was included but the top bid was not revealed
The Tories went to huge lengths to keep the black-and-white-themed party secret to avoid damaging headlines about ‘Tory fat cats’. Last year’s event caused controversy when The Mail on Sunday revealed how internships with top City firms were auctioned for thousands of pounds for the offspring of party donors. Internships were banned from this year’s auction, conducted by Sotheby’s chairman Henry Wyndham.
Instead, guests paid tens of thousands of pounds to take part in bloodsports on country estates. One such item alone went for £55,000 – a day’s shooting for eight guns on the Tusmore Park estate in North Oxfordshire, where ‘pheasants and partridges are the main quarry but duck can be shot as well’.
Other lots included a day’s stalking at the Buckhurst Park estate in East Sussex – for which the price was kept secret – and shooting for eight guns on an estate in Chiddingfold, Surrey.
A 19-inch statue of Margaret Thatcher sold for £120,000. Dinner for eight with Boris Johnson at Anton Mosimann’s London restaurant also raised £55,000, while an Everest trek with adventurer David Hempleman-Adams went for £20,000.
The Tories were so desperate to keep the event secret that they hired bouncers to guard the trendy Battersea Evolution venue in London for the Black And White Party last Monday night – three days after Huhne was told he would be charged.
Wealthy backers paid up to £10,000 for tables, with the top price for those close to Mr Cameron and Cabinet Ministers. Table sponsors included hedge fund boss Michael Hintze, Swiss-born banker Henry Angest and controversial former party treasurer Michael Spencer.
The event was sponsored by investment group Shore Capital. Activists dined on pan-roasted sea bass, followed by roasted fillet of beef and a dessert of apple and vanilla panna cotta, washed down with £30-a-bottle vintage French wine Chateau Monbousquet Grand Cru 2004.
One guest bid £40,000 to have their picture painted by artist Darren Baker, whose portrait of the Queen was unveiled at Westminster Abbey last year. More than £90,000 was paid towards Tory social action projects, illustrated in the glossy brochure. The event used to be called the Black And White Ball and was a traditional black-tie event. Mr Cameron introduced a dress code of lounge suits and no tie to try to shrug off the Tories’ stuffy image.
Party treasurer Lord Fink rammed home the message that the aim was to raise enough money to govern without the Lib Dems. He said: ‘We must win an overall Commons majority and you can’t fatten the calf on market day. We need to build up our campaigning strength now.’
A Tory Party spokesman last night defended Mr Cameron’s remarks, saying: ‘This was a joke and was taken as such by everyone there.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2099954/Strictly-private-Tory- ball-auctions-55K-shooting-trips-Cameron-takes-pot-shot-Chris-Huhne.ht ml

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2012 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting but very pro Tory biased as you'd expect from the Daily Mail - but I agree wholeheartdley with the sentiment about the revolting Milibands - as usual eulogising Maggie who was a Rothschild asset stripping puppet - for a barrow boy Ted heath did a great job for the Euro Nazis

Bankers drowning in money. Out of touch politicians. Unaccountable quangocrats. Not for generations have those who run Britain been so far removed from the common man

By Dominic Sandbrook
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2132919/Bankers-drowning-mon ey-Out-touch-politicians-Unaccountable-quangocrats-Not-generations-run -Britain-far-removed-common-man.html
PUBLISHED: 22:24, 20 April 2012 | UPDATED: 22:25, 20 April 2012

Three hundred years ago, British politics and society presented a deeply unedifying picture.

In the century after 1700, millions of people lived in desperately poor conditions. Deprived of any meaningful say in their own destiny and condemned to lives of demeaning drudgery, they relieved their frustrations in spasmodic outbursts of mob violence.

At the top, a narrow, gilded elite maintained tight control over the levers of patronage. Under the oligarchic system nicknamed ‘Old Corruption’, a handful of Whig families and their fawning hangers-on jealously hoarded jobs and influence.

This was a system personified by Britain’s first prime minister, Sir Robert Walpole — an immensely talented statesman, to be sure, but also one of the most corrupt politicians this country has ever produced.

As a contemporary ballad remarked, the man who governed Britain from 1721 to 1742 ‘judged of Men’s Worth by the Weight of their Fee’.

At first glance, this might seem like ancient history, irrelevant and obsolete in today’s democratic age. I would argue not.

After all, that ballad could easily apply to many of today’s politicians, especially after the recent revelations about Tory donors paying for dinners with the Prime Minister.

And for one acute observer of 21st- century Britain, we have come full circle. As the brilliant commentator Ferdinand Mount argues in a provocative new book, The New Few, Britain seems to be retreating to the worst excesses of Walpole’s day, when a handful of corrupt oligarchs dominated the lives of millions.

But this is no Left-wing tirade. For Mount is not only a baronet and Old Etonian, he ran the Number 10 Policy Unit under Margaret Thatcher and then headed the Right-wing Centre For Policy Studies.

A Tory of the old school, Mount believes that we are sacrificing the gains that Britain made in the decades after 1945. With social mobility in retreat, ‘power and wealth have, slowly but unmistakably, begun to migrate into the hands of a relatively small elite’.

Of course, the classic example is the current Government. While previous prime ministers such as Ted Heath, Jim Callaghan and Margaret Thatcher came from relatively humble backgrounds, no one could mistake David Cameron — whose mother, by a delicious irony, is Mount’s cousin — for a man of the people.

Of 119 Coalition ministers, 66 per cent went to public schools, compared with only 7 per cent of the general public. And what is more, a staggering 10 per cent went to just one school, Eton.

As for Labour, the Miliband brothers, born and reared in the North London Left-wing intelligentsia, have no more in common with ordinary party members than Sir Robert Walpole did with the average 18th-century labourer.

But, as Mount shows, the slow corrosion of parliamentary democracy is more than merely a question of the individuals involved.

Mass membership of political parties is in deep decline. In the Fifties, the Labour Party had a staggering five million members, while the Tories had about 2.5 million.

What that meant was that about one in five people belonged to a political party — something unimaginable in the 21st century. For today, the Labour Party has barely 180,000 members, while the Tories have fewer than 250,000.

Little wonder that voter turnout is so pitiful, because even amid the excitement of the 2010 election only 65 per cent of the electorate bothered to vote.

Yet this is merely a symptom of a wider malaise. It is a myth, Mount argues, that the British people are ‘apathetic’ — for hundreds of thousands, even millions, are perfectly happy to march for and against major issues of our time, from the Iraq War and fox-hunting to student fees and spending cuts.

The reality is that most people believe political participation will get them nowhere and achieve nothing. They see party conferences stage-managed by the leadership and Commons votes rigged by the whips.

They see policies devised on the Downing Street sofa, and top-down solutions imposed by Whitehall bureaucrats.

More than 30 years ago, Labour’s Tony Benn argued that British politics desperately needed to be opened up to popular participation. Mr Benn might have been completely wrong about many things, but on this point he was quite right.

The sad result, as Mount shows, is that today, power in Britain belongs to a largely unelected elite. Even local government has become a hollow sham. The irony is that once, Britain prided itself on its splendid traditions of local democracy.

In the Victorian age, for example, the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, the great Joseph Chamberlain, brought in municipal gas and water supplies, cleared the city’s slums, and turned himself into the most famous politician in the land.

But that is now a fading memory. Outside London, few people can name a single local representative — largely because Whitehall has become so arrogant and overbearing that not even local planning decisions are safe from interference.

Mount gives the example of High Bickington, a village in Devon which put forward a much-needed scheme for 36 new homes for poor families, 16 private homes, a school and a community centre.

Everyone backed it. The district council approved it. So did the county council. Even the relevant minister in London liked it. But the scheme died, crushed by the Government Office For The South West — just one of thousands of quangos of faceless, unelected bureaucrats.

In many ways, bureaucrats and managers have become the oligarchs of our time. No one elects them, and it is almost impossible to kick them out. Most are from privileged homes; few have any sense of what it is like to drag yourself up from the bottom.

Instead of trusting professional people to get on with the job, they spend their time devising ever more elaborate targets, complete with league tables and performance charts. In return, they are paid sums that make most ordinary people weep with envy.

Most NHS chiefs earn more than the Prime Minister, while board members of the regulator Monitor, which oversees NHS Foundation Trusts, take home a whopping £237,500 a year.

Even many university vice-chancellors earn more than £300,000 a year — and this, grotesquely, at a time when their students will soon face tuition bills of £9,000 a year.

At the heart of all this is a cancerous culture of materialism, greed and self-interest, not just at the top of the public sector, but in banking, finance and business.

Mount quotes a study for Forbes magazine, which found that, in 1998, the CEOs of Britain’s top 100 companies earned 45 times the pay of the ordinary worker.

Who could want more money than that? Well, as it turned out, the CEOs could. By 2010, they earned a staggering 120 times the ordinary salary. And the shocking thing is that the terrible crash of 2007-8 made no difference at all.

Thanks to the bankers’ folly, British taxpayers have had to fork out billions.

But while ordinary families have been struggling to make ends meet after one of the worst recessions in our history, the financial elite have continued to stuff their own coffers with cash. In 2010, as Britain was limping out of recession, City bonuses came to a staggering £14 billion, with one executive, Barclays boss Bob Diamond, pocketing an incredible £6.5 million.

Elsewhere, the pay gap continues to widen. Sir Martin Sorrell, the head of the advertising giant WPP, earns a stunning 631 times more than his average employee.

For Mount, this is the unacceptable face of capitalism. As he reminds us, the U.S. financier J.P. Morgan, who founded one of the world’s greatest business empires, once remarked that no senior executive should earn more than 20 times the salary of his typical employee.

Yet in their sheer greed for plunder, Britain’s new oligarchs have lost sight of their moral obligations.

They are, however, not alone. Indeed, the concentration of power and money in the hands of an increasingly tiny and privileged elite is not just a British phenomenon — as a glance across the Channel will tell you.

As Mount observes, one of the most impregnable bastions of the new bureaucratic order is the Brussels headquarters of the European Union.

Once conceived as a laudably idealistic project to banish the hatreds of the past, the EU has become ‘an arrogant and unresponsive oligarchy’.

In this case, Mount’s term ‘oligarchy’ — meaning government by a privileged few — is particularly well chosen.

He writes that the Eurocrats ‘belong to a ruling elite that cannot be ejected by the voters and whose membership changes only through being refreshed by co-opting others like themselves’.

No one votes for European commissioners or Brussels officials. We cannot get rid of them; most of us do not even know who they are.

‘Insulated from the hot breath of the electorate’, they are as remote from the rest of us as Walpole’s Whig grandees were from our 18th-century forebears. And this, of course, helps to explain the genesis of the euro, ‘the oligarch project to end all oligarch projects, entered into in a spirit of reckless vainglory and with no thought of who its casualties might be if things went wrong’.

The casualties, as we now know, are the ordinary people of Greece, Ireland, Spain and Portugal.

Yes, their governments were criminally reckless, and to some extent they are paying the inevitable price for their own absurd profligacy.

But thanks to the ruthless imperatives of the eurozone and the ideological self-interest of Europe’s leaders, millions of ordinary working families now find themselves condemned to years of cuts, grinding poverty and unemployment.

Could there be a better symbol of the gulf between leaders and led?

The truth is that, like so many Western countries, Britain has become an increasingly polarised country, divided between a self-interested elite, a welfare-dependent underclass, and a great mass of people in between, bewildered, disenfranchised and increasingly angry.

As Mount notes, Left-wing critics often blame this on Margaret Thatcher.

Indeed, even he admits that, sadly, despite her attempts to encourage social mobility — epitomised by the laudable and groundbreaking sale of council houses to working-class tenants — the gap between rich and poor widened during the Eighties. But New Labour, with their slavish obeisance to the City of London, contributed to this just as much as the Tories.

It was, after all, Tony Blair’s right-hand man, Peter Mandelson, who remarked that they were ‘intensely relaxed about people getting filthy rich’ — a statement that would have been unimaginable from the working-class men and women who built the self-described people’s party.

And in any case, the causes go deeper than the political headlines, from the slow and sadly inevitable death of heavy industry, which kicked away the ladder for so many working-class school leavers, to the onset of globalisation, which saw thousands of manufacturing jobs disappear to China and India, and gave birth to a new international elite of the super-rich.


'We're all in this together': To most people, George Osborne's words sound worse than hollow

At the end of his elegant but angry book, Mount suggests a host of changes that might make a difference.

Giving shareholders a real say on directors’ pay, he says, would help to check the greed of the financial elite. Reforming the welfare state by slashing bureaucracy, targeting the genuinely needy and making work pay, would help those at the bottom.

Strengthening the House of Commons, by beefing up the committee system to hold the over-mighty executive to account, might revitalise our democracy.

And reviving the old technical schools would give ordinary school-leavers genuine vocational skills and experiences, enabling our working-class youngsters to compete with their international rivals.

But the really necessary change, it seems to me, is a cultural one. For half a century, Britain, like other Western countries, has become an increasingly materialistic, individualistic society, symbolised by the rise of rights at the expense of responsibilities.

We now take for granted that the state will look after us. We automatically demand respect, without necessarily earning it. We see ourselves as masters of our little universes, as self-contained individuals in a world that no longer believes in moral obligations and social duty.

At first, this seemed a tremendously positive development, banishing the insularity, poverty and class-consciousness of the past.

After years of deprivation, millions delighted in their new comforts. And after centuries of impenetrable hierarchy, the rise of individualism seemed a thoroughly good thing.

But the sad truth is that all this has long since tipped over into naked self-interest.

The bankers who feather their own nests, the politicians who fiddle their expenses, the fat cats who dodge their tax bills — all are merely symptomatic of a general culture that ignores the greater good and scorns the national interest.

One day, surely, the pendulum will shift. Not even Sir Robert Walpole, who ruled Britain for so long, lasted for ever.

‘We are all in this together,’ says Chancellor George Osborne — and, to put it bluntly, only a fool would believe him.

Yet as Mount writes: ‘We can remember times in the not so distant past when this belonging together was taken for granted. So it could be again.’

Amen to that.

The New Few Or A Very British Oligarchy, by Ferdinand Mount, is published by Simon and Schuster on May 1 at £18.99. To order this book for £16.99 (p&p free), call 0843 382 000.

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PostPosted: Tue May 15, 2012 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bullingdon Club at the BBC much to the quiet embarassment of David Dimbleby

Boris Johnson "Dimbleby, Dimbleby, he was a Bullingdon Man"

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCNJu1n1y1E
Boris Johnson interrupting Will Self on Question Time, mentioning David Dimbleby's membership of the Bullingdon Club. Notice he does it right at the beginning as well.



1. Sebastian Grigg

Still close to David Cameron, Grigg knew him from Eton and lives nearby, in Holland Park. Born into privilege - he is the oldest son of Baron Altrincham, Anthony Ullick David Dundas Grigg, and went to Eton before going to Oriel College - he is now a member of the moneyed aristocracy as a partner at Goldman Sachs.

He and his wife, former Times journalist Rachel Kelly, host an annual Christmas drinks in Lansdowne Crescent which is very much a fixture for Notting Hill grandees. Grigg made an unsuccessful bid to be a Tory MP.

2. David Cameron

Misdemeanours with cannabis aside, Cameron was clearly a surefooted operator at Eton, for by the time he arrived at Oxford he had the social connections to make joining the Bullingdon Club easy.

He still found time for work, though, getting a first in Philosophy, Politics and Economics before going on to work at the Conservative Research Department. Spells at the Treasury and Home Office, then seven years as communications head at Carlton TV. Elected MP for Witney in 2001, and became Tory leader in 2005.

3. Ralph Perry Robinson

A former child actor, he had a walkon part in the 1984 film Another Country, that study of public school homosexuality and betrayal.

At Oxford he once paraded round Oriel quad dressed as a monk and calling for virgins to be sacrificed. A former pupil of the Prince of Wales Institute of Architecture, he was recruited by Richard Rogers to help him design a virtual reality centre in Japan. He now lives in a village near Salisbury, Wiltshire, where he makes furniture.

4. Ewen Fergusson

Generally thought of as the "quiet one" of the group, Fergusson also had a wild side and is thought to have been responsible for a notorious Bullingdon incident in which a plant pot was thrown through a restaurant window, resulting in six members spending a night in police cells.

The son of former rugby international turned British ambassador in Paris Sir Ewen Fergusson, Ewen Junior - Rugby and Oriel - is now a partner in the banking and finance section of City law firm Herbert Smith.

5. Matthew Benson

Born into proper money - his family were wealthy merchant bankers - Benson spent three years working for Morgan Stanley before setting up a property consultancy.

Now a director of Rettie and Co, an Edinburgh-based property company, he married in 1997 Lady Lulu Douglas-Hamilton, ex-wife of Lord Patrick Douglas-Hamilton, at a ceremony which involved a ruined castle being rebuilt over three floors.

6. Sebastian James

Another Bullingdon blue blood, James is the son of Lord Northbourne, a major landowner from Kent. Something of an entrepreneur, his business ventures have included a DVD rental business, Silverscreen, and a dotcom business, ClassicForum, which was supposed to be an eBay for rare books.

7. Jonathan Ford

The president of the Bullingdon - a post to which Boris Johnson aspired, but never succeeded in attaining - the Westminster-educated Ford was elected to the post because "he had a mad genius about him".

After Oxford, where he read modern history, he had a spell in the City as a banker with Morgan Grenfell before going into financial journalism. He is now deputy editor of a financial website, and married to Susannah Herbert, literary editor of the Sunday Times.

8. Boris Johnson

He looked much the same then as he does now, albeit a trifle slimmer, and was regarded in much the same light: ludicrous, but with an ambition that is not to be underestimated. Beaten by Ford for the post of president of the Buller, he made up for it by becoming president of the Oxford Union.

Editor of the Spectator from 1999 to 2005, and MP for Henley since 2001, his chief occupations outside journalism and politics would seem to be amusing television quiz show audiences and being unfaithful to his wives (two, at the last count).

9. Harry Eastwood

Another old Etonian, after Oxford Eastwood worked in corporate finance at Storehouse, the retail group. Later tried his hand at setting up his own business, co-founding a firm called Filmbox which aimed to operate vending machines for people to rent videos from. They were persuasive enough to get backers to stump up £450,000, but the business was a failure before it even got off the ground. Is now commercial director for a company called Monkey.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-435875/Camerons-cronies-Bullin gdon-class-87.html


Edward VII
Edward VIII (The super Nazi)
Frederick IX of Denmark
Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany
Prince Paul of Yugoslavia
Rama VI, King of Siam
Michael Ancram
Timothy Beaumont, Baron Beaumont of Whitley
Gottfried von Bismarck
David Dimbleby
The Hon. Sir David Bowes-Lyon
The Rt. Hon. David Cameron
Sir Raymond Carr
Henry Chaplin, 1st Viscount Chaplin
Lord Randolph Churchill
Alan Clark, MP
George Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston
David Dimbleby
David Faber, head master of Summer Fields School
Peter Fleming
George Gibbs, 1st Baron Wraxall
Jason Gissing
William Grenfell, 1st Baron Desborough
Darius Guppy
Peter Holmes à Court
Nick Hurd, MP
Boris Johnson, Mayor of London
Sir Frederick Johnstone, 8th Baronet
Sir Ludovic Kennedy
Walter Long, 1st Viscount Long
Harry Mount
Serge Obolensky
George Osborne, MP
Frank Pakenham, 7th Earl of Longford
John Profumo
John Rankin Rathbone, MP
Cecil Rhodes
Major-General Sir Sebastian John Lechmere Roberts, KCVO, OBE
Nathaniel Philip Rothschild
John Scott, 9th Duke of Buccleuch
Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 8th Duke of Buccleuch
Radosław Sikorski, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland
Thomas Assheton Smith II
Charles Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer
Alexander Thynn, 7th Marquess of Bath
Prince Felix Yussupov

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullingdon_Club#Notable_members



DimblebyJohnsonBullingdon.jpg
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David Dimbleby smirks - what a rat!
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Last edited by TonyGosling on Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:46 pm; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2012 1:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'George's friends locked me in Portaloo and rolled me down hill': Chancellor with his high society Bullingdon Club at Oxford, Year Two - when things were looking up...

By Glen Owen

PUBLISHED: 22:06, 14 July 2012 | UPDATED: 22:06, 14 July 2012
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2173628/Georges-friends-locked -Portaloo-rolled-hill-Chancellor-high-society-Bullingdon-Club-Oxford-Y ear-Two--things-looking-.html

It is an image which has haunted George Osborne – a picture of him posing with fellow members of the ultra-exclusive Bullingdon Club at Oxford University.

Political opponents have used the 1992 image to portray the Chancellor as ‘out of touch’ and to mock his claim that ‘we are all in this together’.

Now The Mail on Sunday has unearthed a previously unpublished photograph of Mr Osborne posing with fellow members of the riotous club, which is open only to sons of aristocratic families or the wealthy and well-connected.


A new picture of the Bullingdon Club members - including current Chancellor George Osborne, left - in 1993 has emerged

It was taken in the summer of 1993, days before Mr Osborne graduated from Magdalen College. The club’s celebrations that term included placing one of the ‘Buller men’ in a Portaloo and rolling it down a hill.

In the 1992 shot, Mr Osborne is standing with his hands behind his back, looking confident; in the 1993 picture, taken on the same steps of Christ Church, he is on the edge of the group, his hair is longer, his hands are on his hips and he is staring moodily into the distance.




Also seen in the 1993 photograph are journalist Harry Mount (back row, second from left), businessman Chris Coleridge (seated middle) and multi-millionaire financier Nat Rothschild (front row, second from left).

They are joined by new entrants including Jo Johnson, young brother of London Mayor Boris Johnson (leaning against the wall, hands in pockets).

Then in his second year reading history at Balliol College, Jo became a Tory MP in 2010 and is tipped for fast-track promotion.

The Bullingdon Club has a tradition of ‘omerta’, a code of silence, among its members, but Mr Mount has written about the 1993 cohort, without identifying the individuals involved.

‘When I was in the Bullingdon, I paid £100 to be rolled down a hill in a Portaloo by a Hungarian count in a field 20 miles out of Oxford,’ he wrote.

‘It was the climax of the summer gathering of Oxford’s Bullingdon Club in 1993.



Haunted: Chancellor George Osborne and Prime Minister David Cameron, left, have been embarrassed by their Bullingdon Club photographs. And Mr Osborne, right, with Harry Mount in the first club picture

'The cubicle skipped a couple of revolutions and came to a juddering halt.

'Like a crestfallen Dracula climbing out of his coffin, I gingerly lifted the door; fortunately the door was facing the sky.’

Another Bullingdon contemporary of Mr Osborne last year recounted – anonymously – their alcohol-fuelled antics.

He described the future Chancellor as looking ‘mildly alarmed’ as members threw plates and became involved in fist fights at Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire, the Rothschild family seat.

The source said that on another occasion, Osborne and the Bullingdon went for a meal at a restaurant where Lenny Henry and his then wife, Dawn French, were having dinner.

He said: ‘A couple of the boys started getting obnoxious and talking about their family wealth and Lenny Henry said, “Actually, sod off.”

'There was a slight altercation when a member put a cigar out on someone’s lapel and it turned into a fist fight and furniture was broken.

'It was horrible. We used to smash everything up then give a cheque saying, “It’s OK, we can pay for it.” ’

There is no suggestion Mr Osborne was directly involved in the incidents.

David Cameron has similarly been embarrassed by a 1987 picture of him with Bullingdon Club members.

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cameron the rioter followed by Daily ail Bullingdon WANTED posters!

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2LwHDOsnWU



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2179375/Bullingdon-Club-photo- 1993-Who-George-Osbornes-friends.html



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2180095/Georges-bully-boys-Ooz ing-entitlement-young-Osborne-poses-Oxfords-infamous-Bullingdon-Club-n ewly-discovered-photo-But-they.html


1. Rupert Cotterell: The grandson of the 6th Baron Camoys, he learnt to fly while studying architectural history at Oxford and was likened to Biggles because of his appearance.
Described as having ‘boundless enthusiasm’, he returned to his family’s manor house in rural Dorset after graduation and still lives in the area. Now 41 and married with three children, he helps run the family mail order food business, Cornucopia Foods.

2. Chris Coleridge: He is a descendant of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, brother of Condé Nast managing director Nicholas Coleridge, and son of Lloyds of London boss David Coleridge.
Chris studied history at Exeter College where, with financier Nat Rothschild, he launched a racy student newspaper called Rumpus which featured a topless model, a ‘Page 7 fella’ and a guide on how to steal cars, which was frowned on by the local police.
George Osborne appeared on the magazine’s astrology page, wearing a wizard’s costume. In 2005 Coleridge founded V Water, which sells vitamin-infused water. It was later sold to Pepsi. The 41-year-old recently moved to the U.S. to pursue a new business venture.

3. Nat Rothschild: The billionaire financier, 41, is the youngest of four children and, as the only boy, the future 5th Baron Rothschild. After Eton, where contemporaries remember him as an unruly student, he studied history at Wadham College.
To his family’s horror, he met Kate Moss’s friend, model Annabelle Neilson, on a beach in India and when he was 23 they eloped to Las Vegas and married. They partied hard, but after three years punctuated by explosive rows, they divorced. He later stopped drinking and turned his life around, and is now tipped to become the richest ever Rothschild.
Already heir to a £750 million fortune, he also ran the Atticus hedge fund, which grew from £60 million in assets to a peak of £13 billion before it was wound up three years ago.
The tax exile has homes in Manhattan, Paris and the Swiss ski resort of Klosters, and spends 750 hours each year in his private jet.
Last summer he celebrated his 40th birthday with a £1 million, three-day extravaganza in Porto Montenegro at the marina billed ‘the Monaco of the Adriatic’. The guest list included politicians, such as Peter Mandelson, industrialists and celebrities.

4. Mark Petre: The son of the 18th Baron Petre, he was part of an aristocratic family who made their fortune during the Tudor dissolution of the monasteries. After Oxford he became the editor of a glossy property magazine, International Homes.
In 2004 he was found dead, age 34, at his family’s stately home, Ingatestone Hall in Essex, while awaiting trial for driving under the influence of drugs after his Mercedes hit a BMW. The sedative Tamazepam was in his bloodstream ‘in excess of the therapeutic dose’, but his death was treated as ‘unsuspicious’.

5. Ed Harris: The Old Etonian studied modern languages at Christ Church. He now works in the City and is head of Asian equity sales at Standard Chartered Bank in London.

6. William Nourse: He trained as an accountant after graduating in experimental psychology from Corpus Christi College. Since 2003, the Old Etonian has worked for Deutsche Bank and is now based in Hong Kong.
Part of his job has also involved advising the National Bank of Greece. He has two children with his wife Annabel, who is the daughter of Lt General Sir John Paul Foley.

7. Mani Boni: The Italian polo player has taken part in prestigious tournaments around Europe. He is also a successful entrepreneur who was a founder of social travel site Roomsurfer.

8. Jo Johnson: The younger brother of London Mayor Boris Johnson, and son of politician Stanley Johnson, he graduated with a first in history from Balliol College in 1994. After postgraduate studies in Europe, he worked at Deutsche Bank and later as a journalist at the Financial Times.
He is married to social affairs journalist Amelia Gentleman and they have two children. Johnson, 40, became a Tory MP in 2010 and is tipped for fast-track promotion.
He declined to comment on the Bullingdon photograph — or why he is the only member of the club wearing grey trousers — and suggested that all queries should be directed to George Osborne’s office.

9. Christopher Egerton-Warburton: He has been described as the ‘picture of worldly success’, ‘charming but ruthless’ and a rare example that ‘bankers can be a force for good’.
The descendant of a Baron, Egerton-Warburton read biochemistry at Christ Church and worked for Goldman Sachs for 14 years before co-founding an investment banking firm specialising in sustainable projects in Africa and developing regions.
He was involved in the establishment of one of the largest charities in the UK which funds immunisation programmes in partnership with government, and is a trustee for several charities.
He has described himself as lucky to be alive after breaking his neck when he was knocked off his bicycle last year. The married 41-year-old lives in Pimlico, central London, and has two children, including a daughter with the middle name Lettice.

10. Lord Alexander Hope: The 41-year-old is the son of the 4th Marquess of Linlithgow. After graduation he became a merchant banker then quit to join the art world. He worked at Christie’s and last year became director of the Art Inventory company.
His friend, Tory MP Louise Mensch, acknowledged his help in her 1999 chick-lit novel, Venus Envy. In 2008, he was named by Tatler magazine in the top 100 most invited power partygoers alongside Boris Johnson and David and Samantha Cameron.

11. James Axtell: He attended Oxford’s exclusive Dragon School and Radley College, then took a degree in materials science, economics and management at Trinity College. He worked in venture capital before helping to set up the Sainsbury’s Nectar loyalty programme. He is now a director of a renewable energy company.

12. Dan Higgins: Son of Baron Higgins, a former Tory minister and Olympic athlete, and Dame Rosalyn Higgins QC, the ex-president of the International Court of Justice and a senior legal adviser on the Chilcot Inquiry into the Iraq war.
Dan, 41, studied Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Oxford and later worked in wealth management for Merrill Lynch before becoming a partner in hedge fund Fauchier Partners. The father of two lives in Notting Hill, a few streets from David Cameron’s townhouse.
The Prime Minister was in the Bullingdon in 1987, six years before Osborne. In 2009, with his TV producer wife, Jacqueline, Mr Higgins was invited to a Conservatives’ premier political dinner at the Carlton Club, described by one newspaper as the ‘New Tory power brokers’ dinner.

13. Paul Higgins: He attended Manchester Grammar School before studying at Trinity College, Oxford. Called to the Bar in 1996, he works in Manchester specialising in personal injury and fraud cases.

14. Luke Bridgeman: second son of the 3rd Viscount Bridgeman, he became heir after the death of his older brother. He was educated at Eton and graduated from New College with a double first in Classics and Russian. Now 41, he’s married with two children and works for private equity firm Dawnay Day, running assets worth over $4billion.

15. Harry Mount: The son of baronet and Conservative politician Ferdinand Mount and a cousin of David Cameron, he initially worked as a banker after graduating with a degree in classics from Magdalen College. He retrained to be a lawyer but quit and wrote a book, My Brief Career, on his two years as a pupil barrister.
Formerly the New York correspondent of the Daily Telegraph, Harry, 41, is currently a freelance journalist who writes for the Mail among other papers.

16. George Osborne: The Chancellor, 41, is the eldest son of baronet Sir Peter Osborne, the founder of wallpaper merchants Osborne & Little. His real name is Gideon but he has used his grandfather’s name George since the age of 13. He graduated with a 2:1 in modern history from Magdalen College, Oxford, and also edited the university magazine Isis.
One issue was printed on hemp paper, made from the stems of cannabis plants. He is married to the novelist Frances Osborne and they have two children, Luke and Liberty. Osborne has admitted regrets about his ‘Bully’ past: ‘It’s embarrassing looking at photos of yourself dressed up like a penguin.’

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Noticed David Dimbleby being so biased last night - interrupting all the guests except David Aaronovich who he let talk over everybody.
I was reminded of his Bullingdon Club credentials
Michael Heseltine last night was wonderful bless him, from another political era!


TonyGosling wrote:
Bullingdon Club at the BBC much to the quiet embarassment of David Dimbleby

Boris Johnson "Dimbleby, Dimbleby, he was a Bullingdon Man"

Link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCNJu1n1y1E
Boris Johnson interrupting Will Self on Question Time, mentioning David Dimbleby's membership of the Bullingdon Club. Notice he does it right at the beginning as well.



1. Sebastian Grigg

Still close to David Cameron, Grigg knew him from Eton and lives nearby, in Holland Park. Born into privilege - he is the oldest son of Baron Altrincham, Anthony Ullick David Dundas Grigg, and went to Eton before going to Oriel College - he is now a member of the moneyed aristocracy as a partner at Goldman Sachs.

He and his wife, former Times journalist Rachel Kelly, host an annual Christmas drinks in Lansdowne Crescent which is very much a fixture for Notting Hill grandees. Grigg made an unsuccessful bid to be a Tory MP.

2. David Cameron

Misdemeanours with cannabis aside, Cameron was clearly a surefooted operator at Eton, for by the time he arrived at Oxford he had the social connections to make joining the Bullingdon Club easy.

He still found time for work, though, getting a first in Philosophy, Politics and Economics before going on to work at the Conservative Research Department. Spells at the Treasury and Home Office, then seven years as communications head at Carlton TV. Elected MP for Witney in 2001, and became Tory leader in 2005.

3. Ralph Perry Robinson

A former child actor, he had a walkon part in the 1984 film Another Country, that study of public school homosexuality and betrayal.

At Oxford he once paraded round Oriel quad dressed as a monk and calling for virgins to be sacrificed. A former pupil of the Prince of Wales Institute of Architecture, he was recruited by Richard Rogers to help him design a virtual reality centre in Japan. He now lives in a village near Salisbury, Wiltshire, where he makes furniture.

4. Ewen Fergusson

Generally thought of as the "quiet one" of the group, Fergusson also had a wild side and is thought to have been responsible for a notorious Bullingdon incident in which a plant pot was thrown through a restaurant window, resulting in six members spending a night in police cells.

The son of former rugby international turned British ambassador in Paris Sir Ewen Fergusson, Ewen Junior - Rugby and Oriel - is now a partner in the banking and finance section of City law firm Herbert Smith.

5. Matthew Benson

Born into proper money - his family were wealthy merchant bankers - Benson spent three years working for Morgan Stanley before setting up a property consultancy.

Now a director of Rettie and Co, an Edinburgh-based property company, he married in 1997 Lady Lulu Douglas-Hamilton, ex-wife of Lord Patrick Douglas-Hamilton, at a ceremony which involved a ruined castle being rebuilt over three floors.

6. Sebastian James

Another Bullingdon blue blood, James is the son of Lord Northbourne, a major landowner from Kent. Something of an entrepreneur, his business ventures have included a DVD rental business, Silverscreen, and a dotcom business, ClassicForum, which was supposed to be an eBay for rare books.

7. Jonathan Ford

The president of the Bullingdon - a post to which Boris Johnson aspired, but never succeeded in attaining - the Westminster-educated Ford was elected to the post because "he had a mad genius about him".

After Oxford, where he read modern history, he had a spell in the City as a banker with Morgan Grenfell before going into financial journalism. He is now deputy editor of a financial website, and married to Susannah Herbert, literary editor of the Sunday Times.

8. Boris Johnson

He looked much the same then as he does now, albeit a trifle slimmer, and was regarded in much the same light: ludicrous, but with an ambition that is not to be underestimated. Beaten by Ford for the post of president of the Buller, he made up for it by becoming president of the Oxford Union.

Editor of the Spectator from 1999 to 2005, and MP for Henley since 2001, his chief occupations outside journalism and politics would seem to be amusing television quiz show audiences and being unfaithful to his wives (two, at the last count).

9. Harry Eastwood

Another old Etonian, after Oxford Eastwood worked in corporate finance at Storehouse, the retail group. Later tried his hand at setting up his own business, co-founding a firm called Filmbox which aimed to operate vending machines for people to rent videos from. They were persuasive enough to get backers to stump up £450,000, but the business was a failure before it even got off the ground. Is now commercial director for a company called Monkey.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-435875/Camerons-cronies-Bullin gdon-class-87.html


Edward VII
Edward VIII (The super Nazi)
Frederick IX of Denmark
Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany
Prince Paul of Yugoslavia
Rama VI, King of Siam
Michael Ancram
Timothy Beaumont, Baron Beaumont of Whitley
Gottfried von Bismarck
David Dimbleby
The Hon. Sir David Bowes-Lyon
The Rt. Hon. David Cameron
Sir Raymond Carr
Henry Chaplin, 1st Viscount Chaplin
Lord Randolph Churchill
Alan Clark, MP
George Curzon, 1st Marquess Curzon of Kedleston
David Dimbleby
David Faber, head master of Summer Fields School
Peter Fleming
George Gibbs, 1st Baron Wraxall
Jason Gissing
William Grenfell, 1st Baron Desborough
Darius Guppy
Peter Holmes à Court
Nick Hurd, MP
Boris Johnson, Mayor of London
Sir Frederick Johnstone, 8th Baronet
Sir Ludovic Kennedy
Walter Long, 1st Viscount Long
Harry Mount
Serge Obolensky
George Osborne, MP
Frank Pakenham, 7th Earl of Longford
John Profumo
John Rankin Rathbone, MP
Cecil Rhodes
Major-General Sir Sebastian John Lechmere Roberts, KCVO, OBE
Nathaniel Philip Rothschild
John Scott, 9th Duke of Buccleuch
Walter Montagu Douglas Scott, 8th Duke of Buccleuch
Radosław Sikorski, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland
Thomas Assheton Smith II
Charles Spencer, 9th Earl Spencer
Alexander Thynn, 7th Marquess of Bath
Prince Felix Yussupov

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullingdon_Club#Notable_members

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PostPosted: Tue Feb 10, 2015 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Core of the British elite cult exposed last night at the Tory Black & White Ball where hedge fund managers hand over the loot for Conservative party general election campaign

Invitations to the fundraiser were sent out to Tory donors in October
General election: Paying £15,000-a-table, just who are the donors funding the Tories’ election campaign?

How attending elite event represents good value for super-rich fearing the mansion tax
By OLIVER WRIGHT
Monday 09 February 2015
The embossed invitations began dropping through the letter boxes of some of the richest men and women in Britain in October.
Bordered with the outlines of the red, white and blue Union Flag, the thick card requested the “pleasure” of their company at the Conservatives’ Black and White election fundraiser.
But the accompanying literature made it clear that it was less the pleasure of their company the Tories were requesting – and more the pleasure of their wallets.
Tables of 10 at the event, which was held last night at the slightly faded but undeniably posh Grosvenor House hotel in Park Lane, cost up to £15,000 each, while the minimum price for a single ticket was £500.
And the more you paid the more you got: a £15,000 table for 10 secured you the company of a cabinet minister, while for £10,000 you got a minister of state. Tables at the back of the Grosvenor’s Great Room went for £5,000, but those “cheap seats” had to make do with a mere backbench MP.
Major donors to the Conservative Party

Invitees, the invitation made clear, had to pay up-front to reserve their place – and there was even space to “top up” the table fee with an extra donation.
But, of course, that was only the start. Everything about the event was designed to fill the Conservatives’ coffers in the run-up to May’s ballot.
A similar summer fundraising event last year featured auction prizes such as a game of tennis with David Cameron and Boris Johnson (sold to a Russian banker’s wife for £160,000) and an “Eight Gun Pheasant Shoot” (a prize donated by the wife of the Syrian-born businessman Wafic Said).
This year’s event is expected to have raised much more as the Conservatives’ wealthy donor base looks down the barrel of Labour’s mansion tax and new levies on the hedge-fund billionaires that David Cameron’s fundraisers have so assiduously courted over the past five years.
It is a sign of exactly the kind of people that the Tories are targeting that the chairwoman of this year’s event organising committee was Zoë Law, wife of Andrew Law, one of the hedge fund industry’s most successful money managers. Mr Law is estimated to be worth £350m.


'My Bullingdon days were more civilised than Mr Cameron's': David Dimbleby said he never got wildly drunk when he was member of notorious society
BBC broadcaster said he 'loved being elected' to the Bullingdon Club
Question Time host joined as Oxford University undergraduate in late 60s
The controversial group counts David Cameron, George Osborne and Boris Johnson among its former members
Dimbleby added that taking older women off air was 'demeaning'
He said it was a 'waste' of talent and experience
By LAURA COX FOR THE DAILY MAIL
PUBLISHED: 01:11, 28 May 2013 | UPDATED: 09:15, 28 May 2013

David Dimbleby, pictured as an undergraduate at Oxford University where he was editor the student magazine, said he was proud to be elected to the Bullingdon Club
It is the Oxford drinking society with some very important alumni – and a rather poor reputation.
But the Bullingdon Club was once a perfectly gentlemanly outfit, according to broadcaster David Dimbleby.
The Question Time host has revealed his pride at belonging to the controversial group that counts David Cameron, George Osborne and Boris Johnson among its former members.
The 74-year-old said: ‘I loved being elected to the Bullingdon Club and I’m very proud of the uniform that I can still get into.
‘We never did these disgusting disgraceful things that Boris did.
‘We never broke windows or got wildly drunk. It was a completely different organisation from what it became when Boris Johnson, David Cameron, and George Osborne joined, who seemed to be ashamed of it, pulling their photographs and so on.’
This comment appears to be a reference to attempts by the Bullingdon Club’s official photographers, Gillman and Soame, to prevent newspapers from publishing the picture featured here.
Bullingdon stories typically involve drunk, well-off young men in expensive clothes smashing up restaurants – only to present the owner with a cheque to cover the damage at the end of the night.
Mr Cameron has told friends he is ‘deeply embarrassed’ over his Bullingdon days.
The Prime Minister graduated from Oxford with a first-class degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics in 1988.
Mr Dimbleby left with a third in the same degree more than two decades earlier.
Despite the BBC star’s claims about better behaviour, critics may point out that ‘the Buller’, as its well-heeled members refer to it, was notorious long before Mr Cameron and his Conservative colleagues became involved.

Novelist Evelyn Waugh wrote of ‘the Bollinger Club’ in Decline and Fall, describing it as ‘English county families baying for broken glass’.
Mr Dimbleby, speaking to Radio Times, also criticised the BBC and other broadcasters for ‘demeaning’ older women by taking them off-air.
Bullingdon Club's former members include David Cameron (back row second left) and Boris Johnson (seated right)
Bullingdon Club's former members include David Cameron (back row second left) and Boris Johnson (seated right)
Mr Dimbleby – once labelled a ‘charming dinosaur’ by former newsreader Anna Ford – said age should not be a factor for women, claiming they ‘mature elegantly and better than men, very often’.
He added that executives are told that ‘attractive young women bring in a bigger audience than less-attractive older women, to say nothing of less-attractive older men’.
He continued: ‘That’s the way the TV industry works. I think it’s wrong. If you look at American TV, it keeps women at work.
‘They use their experience in that same way that they would use John Simpson’s experience or mine. It is demeaning to women and a crazy loss of talent.’


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2331891/My-Bullingdon-days-civ ilised-Mr-Camerons-David-Dimbleby-said-got-wildly-drunk-member-notorio us-society.html

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 24, 2015 10:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More than just a passing resemblance to the US Skull and Bones here as new Bullingdon club members get tapped up by having their bedrooms stormed in the middle of the night by the Bullingdon recruitment squad.

The Bullingdon Club

Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jra3By2DCic
The Bullingdon Club is an exclusive society at Oxford University, noted for its grand banquets and boisterous rituals, such as 'trashing' of restaurants and college rooms.

part 2
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OceMW1py-dE

part 3
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-oPiIKJYdA

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 10:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Piers Gaveston dining club too!

Cameron and the pig with a bemused look on its face! How future PM took part in outrageous initiation ceremony after joining Oxford dining society

By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail
23:21 20 Sep 2015, updated 23:22 20 Sep 2015
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3242550/Cameron-pig-bemused-lo ok-face-future-PM-took-outrageous-initiation-ceremony-joining-Oxford-d ining-society.html

Shocking claims emerge of David Cameron's university days in new book
Call Me Dave: The Unauthorised Biography is written by Michael Ashcroft
Distinguished Oxford contemporary, now an MP, claims Prime Minister once took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony involving a dead pig
A distinguished Oxford contemporary claims Cameron once took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony involving a dead pig while at university. The PM is pictured holding a pig in recent years +6
A distinguished Oxford contemporary claims Cameron once took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony involving a dead pig while at university. The PM is pictured holding a pig in recent years
When Cameron arrived at Oxford, it was in the wake of the huge success of the TV series Brideshead Revisited.

Based on Evelyn Waugh’s novel, it featured the handsome and decadent Lord Sebastian Flyte, who wore a cricket pullover and over-indulged in alcohol.

Did Cameron take this Edwardian fop as his inspiration? James Delingpole, an Oxford friend, certainly recalls the future PM being fond of wearing a cricket sweater.

‘There was a division at Oxford between those of us who wanted to live the Brideshead lifestyle — to ape it — and the people wearing donkey jackets who were in support of the miners,’ he says.

‘The atmosphere among those of us who wanted to live the Brideshead life was really quite pleasant. There were cocktail parties in the Master’s [head of college] Garden . . . and we could all play at being Sebastian Flyte.’

But Cameron went a great deal further. He also got involved in the notorious Oxford dining society, the Piers Gaveston, named after the lover of Edward II, which specialises in bizarre rituals and sexual excess.

A distinguished Oxford contemporary claims Cameron once took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony at a Piers Gaveston event, involving a dead pig. His extraordinary suggestion is that the future PM inserted a private part of his anatomy into the animal’s mouth.

The source — himself an MP — first made the allegation out of the blue at a business dinner in June 2014. Lowering his voice, he claimed to have seen photographic evidence of this disgusting ritual.

My co-author Isabel Oakeshott and I initially assumed this was a joke. It was therefore a surprise when, some weeks later, the MP repeated the allegation.

MORE...
Drugs, debauchery and the making of an extraordinary Prime Minister: For years rumours have dogged him. Now, the truth about the shockingly decadent Oxford days of the gifted Bullingdon boy
Revenge! How PM’s snub to billionaire, who funded the Tories for years, sparked the most explosive political book of the decade
Some months later, he repeated it a third time, providing a little more detail. The pig’s head, he claimed, had been resting on the lap of a Piers Gaveston society member while Cameron performed the act.

The MP also gave us the dimensions of the alleged photograph, and provided the name of the individual who he claims has it in his keeping.

The owner, however, has failed to respond to our approaches. Perhaps it is a case of mistaken identity. Yet it is an elaborate story for an otherwise credible figure to invent.

Furthermore, there are a number of accounts of pigs’ heads at debauched parties in Cameron’s day.

Bullingdon boy: David Cameron pictured (centre frame) as part of the Bullingdon Club at Oxford in 1988 +6
Bullingdon boy: David Cameron pictured (centre frame) as part of the Bullingdon Club at Oxford in 1988
The late Count Gottfried von Bismarck, an Oxford contemporary of Cameron’s, reportedly threw dinner parties featuring the heads of pigs +6
The late Count Gottfried von Bismarck, an Oxford contemporary of Cameron’s, reportedly threw dinner parties featuring the heads of pigs
The claims have emerged in in a new unauthorised biography by Lord Ashcroft +6
The claims have emerged in in a new unauthorised biography by Lord Ashcroft
The late Count Gottfried von Bismarck, an Oxford contemporary of Cameron’s, reportedly threw dinner parties featuring the heads of pigs. (He later became notorious after Olivia Channon, daughter of a Tory minister, died of a heroin overdose in his Christ Church bedroom.)

Meanwhile, Cameron had joined yet another dubious society — the notorious Bullingdon Club — a riotous drinking club for a highly select band of the super-rich.

The bespoke uniform, of navy tailcoats, mustard-coloured waistcoats and sky-blue bow ties, could run to thousands of pounds, putting membership beyond the reach of ordinary students.

So how much significance should be attached to Cameron’s decision to join the Bullingdon Club?

One Tory colleague thinks that the answer is ‘considerable’. The MP concerned was once asked to join the club himself, but attended just one gathering before walking out in disgust.

‘What it basically involved was getting drunk and standing on restaurant tables, shouting about “f***ing plebs”,’ he says. ‘It was all about despising poor people.’

For his part, James Delingpole admits he ‘rather wanted’ to be in the Bullingdon, which had a recruitment ritual of trashing the room of any prospective member. He says: ‘Looking back — a) I didn’t have enough money, and b) I wouldn’t have actually enjoyed the sort of things they did, because I’m not very good at drinking heinous quantities and behaving really, really badly.

‘It’s about mindless destruction, and conspicuous excess and the rather ugly side of upper-class life. It’s loathsome.’

The astonishing claims of Cameron's Oxford days have emerged in Call Me Dave: The Unauthorised Biography Of David Cameron by Michael Ashcroft (pictured with the Prime Minister) and Isabel Oakeshott +6
The astonishing claims of Cameron's Oxford days have emerged in Call Me Dave: The Unauthorised Biography Of David Cameron by Michael Ashcroft (pictured with the Prime Minister) and Isabel Oakeshott
In Cameron’s defence, there’s no evidence that he damaged any property or hurt or offended others. Instead, his participation in club activities appears to have been relatively measured.

David Worth, an American postgraduate student who was in the club at the same time, recalls how his first outing involved taking a boat on the Thames to Cliveden House, the former stately home in Berkshire which was at the centre of the Profumo Scandal in the Sixties and is now a luxury hotel.

‘I remember David quoting Winston Churchill extensively by memory — Churchill was a bit of a lush, so they were quotes about drinking — and he was very funny, he said.

‘A few leaned over the side of the boat occasionally — if you’ve drunk two bottles of champagne in an hour, your stomach’s going to get queasy.’

London Mayor Boris Johnson says of the Bullingdon Club: ‘You wake up with that terrible hung-over sense of shame, accentuated by the feeling that you could have had much more fun if you’d just taken your girlfriend out to dinner. What was the bloody point?’

Cameron may well have come to the same conclusion. Despite his extra-curricular activities, he took his studies very seriously and was highly regarded by tutors.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What #PigGate Really Says About the State of British Politics
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/2015/09/21/what-piggate-really-says-about -the-state-of-british-politics/
http://www.robfahey.co.uk/blog/the-pm-the-pig-and-musings-on-power/
It's not just money that rules politics. Sometimes, it's an elitist circle of jerks. BY ROB FAHEY SEPTEMBER 21, 2015
I am going to try to do something perhaps unwise, perhaps impossible: I’m going to try to write something serious about David Cameron and the scandal that has come to be known as “PigGate.” I’m even going to abstain from porcine puns — because for all that this story is gleeful tabloid filth, I think that at its beating heart, there is an important story here about control, about authority, and about the nature of power in modern Britain.If you’re in the dark regarding PigGate, the details are relatively simple. Billionaire tax exile and former Conservative Party Deputy Chairman Lord Michael Ashcroft has co-written, with journalist Isabel Oakeshott, an unauthorized biography of Cameron. It is not flattering and includes allegations of drug use, among other things. But the attention-grabbing assertion is that during an initiation ceremony for an Oxford student society, Cameron “put a private part of his anatomy” in the mouth of a dead pig — and that photographic proof of this deed exists.Previous revelations about Cameron’s behavior as a student at Oxford — such as his participation in the restaurant-trashing Bullingdon Club, whose initiation rituals include burning a 50-pound note in front of a homeless person — have not harmed Cameron’s career much. Such antics are undoubtedly odious, but are largely the kind of thing lapped up by those already ideologically opposed to him rather than the sort of story which offends his base. How this latest revelation will play out, though, is tough to predict; it should not need to be said that cases of bestial necrophilia among leaders of major nations are uncharted territory.The danger to Cameron is that PigGate makes him a laughing-stock — that his seriousness as a political leader will be forever deflated by the cat calls and innuendo that will, undoubtedly, follow him for the rest of his life. A leader who becomes a political liability for his party is not long for the job; up until now, the security of Cameron’s position has been based on him being the most likeable and statesman-like politician of the Conservative front bench. But how long can a leader be followed around by snorting noises and other pig-related heckling before his party decides that he’s no longer suited to be its public face? This calculation is no doubt being pored over and debated at length by the Conservatives today. There will be those who point out that sexual scandals of the past have blown over eventually, but I don’t know that those models can be applied to something so utterly visceral, so profoundly embarrassing, and so downright grotesque. I don’t know if this kind of story, once attached to the person of a politician, ever goes away.....

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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2015 5:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mass orgies, official drug dealers and the 'Lord High Spanker': Why THAT story about Cameron is nothing compared to the jaw-dropping debauchery of today's Oxford toffs
By Guy Adams for the Daily Mail
23:35 25 Sep 2015, updated 08:15 26 Sep 2015
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3249633/Mass-orgies-official-d rug-dealers-Lord-High-Speaker.html

It costs £90 to attend one of the most notoriously debauched events now
The Piers Gaveston Society party saw around 300 students in fancy dress
It is 'specifically organised so people can take illegal drugs and have sex'
Hugh Grant and Nigella Lawson among those who attended the old parties
Hugh Grant and Marina Killery at Piers Gaveston Ball, Park Lane Hotel in 1983 +8
Hugh Grant and Marina Killery at Piers Gaveston Ball, Park Lane Hotel in 1983
A sight for sore eyes could be observed outside the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford shortly after 7pm on Wednesday, June 24 this year. Gathered on the pavement, waiting for a fleet of coaches, stood no fewer than 300 students in fancy dress outfits that had supposedly been inspired by The Roses Of Heliogabalus — a 19th-century Dutch oil painting that depicts a Roman orgy.

Some wore togas with nothing underneath, while others dressed as scantily clad centurions carrying leather whips in place of swords. One young man sported a red velvet cape along with a vast floral headpiece a foot high, made from pink and white roses.

Many members of this clique, both male and female and with an average age of around 20, wore fishnet tights, brightly coloured bodices, and almost nothing else.

They included a selection of girls with cut-glass accents who, seemingly oblivious to the fact it was broad daylight, milled around in PVC hotpants, see-through bras and leather dog collars.

‘It felt a bit like everyone was going on a school trip, except half the people waiting for the bus were wearing lingerie and S&M kit,’ is how one female guest, an English student, recalls it.

‘Also, not very many school trips get specifically organised so that people can take illegal drugs and have casual sex.’

Each of them had paid £90 to attend one of the most notoriously debauched events in Oxford University’s social calendar: the annual summer party of a secretive dining club called the Piers Gaveston Society.

Founded in 1977, and named after the purported gay lover of Edward II, the Society boasts just a dozen full-time members at any one time. Most are former public school boys of a bohemian persuasion.

Famous alumni over the years have ranged from the actor Hugh Grant to billionaire financier Nat Rothschild, the society conman Darius Guppy, and many more besides.

At their regular formal dinners over the past four decades, Piers Gaveston insiders have worn black tie or effeminate fancy dress and called each other by such assumed titles as ‘Lord High Spanker’ and ‘The High Priest of Pain’.

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They’ve also drunk to hideous excess, indulged in homosexual horseplay and generally lived up to their Latin motto: ‘Fane non memini ne audisse unum alterum ita dilixisse,’ which roughly translates as: ‘Truly, none remember hearing of a man enjoying another so much.’

Then, with the end of each summer’s exams, has come the Society’s main event.

It sees every Piers Gaveston member invite between 20 and 30 liberally minded friends to a clandestine, all-night bash, traditionally held in the grounds of a stately home or country estate.

Though each party is different, they all share a common purpose: to allow fresh-faced Oxford students to drink, dance, take class-A drugs, and indulge in casual sex in conditions of utmost secrecy.

‘Participants are whisked away by coach to a field in the middle of nowhere and promised lots of sex, music, free drink and illicit substances,’ is how a 2003 guide to Oxford’s social calendar put it.

‘Cross-dressing is as likely to feature as speed-laced jelly. It’s part-bacchanal, part-orgy and the rules are simple — there are none.’

Nigella Lawson pictured as a student enjoying herself at the Piers Gaveston Ball at the Park Lane Hotel +8
Nigella Lawson pictured as a student enjoying herself at the Piers Gaveston Ball at the Park Lane Hotel
Piers Gaveston parties have been attended by many young students who went on to achieve prominence in industry, the media, finance, law and politics.

They range from Nigella Lawson and Private Eye editor Ian Hislop to actresses Liz Hurley and Emily Mortimer — and Tom Parker Bowles, stepson of Prince Charles.

While not all these former guests have admitted to (or been accused of indulging in) immoral or illegal behaviour, their celebrity status has been enough to ensure the Piers Gaveston Society’s enduring notoriety among the metropolitan chattering classes.

This week, however, this once secretive dining club suddenly found itself more widely known than ever before.

In fact, it became an international talking point.

To blame was an extraordinary claim — aired in Lord Ashcroft’s new biography of David Cameron — that the future Prime Minister not only ‘got involved’ with the Society while at Oxford in the late Eighties, but also ‘took part in an outrageous initiation ceremony’, at one of its events, ‘involving a dead pig’.

The book, serialised by the Mail this week, claimed that a ‘distinguished Oxford contemporary’ had watched the young Mr Cameron ‘insert a private part of his anatomy into the animal’s mouth’ during the incident.

What is more, it added, this individual ‘claimed to have seen photographic evidence of this disgusting ritual’.

It should, at this stage, be pointed out that Lord Ashcroft’s claim with regard to the pig has been vigorously disputed by Downing Street sources.

Although the story has dominated the news, the supposed photograph that would prove the incident occurred has yet to materialise. For the Prime Minister’s reputation, it is, perhaps, just as well.

Indeed, take a long, hard look at the Piers Gaveston Society — and its history — and you could be forgiven for concluding that an obscene initiation ritual involving a farmyard animal is one of the organisation’s least appalling traditions.

Consider, for example, the organisation’s famous summer party. While it doubtless sounds like a fabulous night out to some young undergraduates — made all the more exotic by the Latin mottos and references to art and classics on the Society’s literature — the reality of the occasion, I have discovered, is rather less edifying.

Invitations to this year’s event — held in a Cotswold field owned by a scion of a brewing dynasty — carried a quotation from the Marquis de Sade: ‘Lust’s passion will be served; it demands, it militates, it tyrannises.’

This year some wore togas with nothing underneath, while others dressed as scantily clad centurions carrying leather whips in place of swords +8
This year some wore togas with nothing underneath, while others dressed as scantily clad centurions carrying leather whips in place of swords
In keeping with this theme, guests were escorted on arrival into a large marquee containing a bar, red suede sofas and glass-topped coffee tables — designed, they were told, to aid drug-taking.

They were greeted by one of the Society’s 12 members — an old boy of Marlborough College, the £34,000-a-year boarding school once attended by the Duchess of Cambridge.

‘He was standing on a table, welcoming everyone to the party,’ recalls the English student.

‘Then all of a sudden, two men got on their knees in front of him, lifted up his toga and began performing a sex act while he was still speaking.

‘There must have been 60 or 70 people in the room and most of them were pretty shocked. You could hear some of them saying: “Oh my God!”

‘It brought home the reality of what we’d actually signed up for.’

After this welcome, revellers explored the rural party venue, which consisted of four marquees.

Aside from the drinks tent, there was a rave tent, which boasted strobe lighting and a DJ playing dance music, and the VIP tent, which contained a lavishly decorated lounge for Society members and their special guests.

The fourth tent was slightly removed from the others. ‘It was completely empty,’ recalls a 21-year-old male law student who attended.

‘We were told that it was where people could go if they didn’t want to be in public. It was described, quite simply, as the sex tent.’

In some nearby woods, meanwhile, was a clearing littered with carpets, rugs and cushions and lit by candles. In the centre were naked fire-eaters and burlesque dancers and a large man who organisers had invited to be the party’s ‘official’ drug dealer.

‘He was selling two products: cocaine and MDMA powder,’ adds the law student. ‘People began buying and taking quite silly amounts, snorting huge lines of powder openly from the tables, from the floor and from each other’s bodies.

‘A friend of mine spoke to the security guys. They are trusted to turn a blind eye to all the drugs and keep it completely secret.

‘In fact, if anybody gets dangerously drunk or overdoses, they drive them 20 minutes away before calling the police.’

One of the Society’s original founders was Valentine Guinness, a brewing heir whose father was Lord Moyne and whose mother was Diana Mitford. Pictured is Pembroke College, Oxford +8
One of the Society’s original founders was Valentine Guinness, a brewing heir whose father was Lord Moyne and whose mother was Diana Mitford. Pictured is Pembroke College, Oxford
Quite how this dovetails with ensuring the health and safety of attendees is anyone’s guess.

But vast quantities of drugs certainly help loosen inhibitions — indeed, within a few hours, the party had degenerated into what one guest describes as ‘essentially, a mass orgy’.

He recalls: ‘People began having sex with complete strangers. It got progressively wilder, thanks to the social lubricant of alcohol and all the drugs in the world.

‘In the tents there were whole piles of people, writhing around on top of each other.

‘The next day, a male friend of mine admitted to having sex with 27 different people.’

Outside, things were barely different. ‘By the early hours of the morning, the sex tent was full and you could hardly move without tripping over groups of boys and girls fumbling, hallucinating and just drifting around,’ recalls another guest.

‘I saw couples pouring bags of drugs into each other’s mouths during sex, girls being led around by nipple clamps, completely naked. It just went on and on.

‘Eventually, coaches turned up at about 5am to take people home. But mine was delayed by a load of posh girls who kept saying that they’d “lost Finbar’s ketamine” which was “wrapped up in a copy of the Daily Telegraph”.

‘They refused to let the driver leave before they’d found it.’

All of which was, if nothing else, squarely in keeping with the Piers Gaveston’s upper-class tradition.

One of the Society’s original founders was Valentine Guinness, a brewing heir whose father was Lord Moyne and whose mother was Blackshirts political leader Oswald Mosley’s former wife Diana Mitford.

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David Cameron gives the Inaugural Duke of Gloucester Lecture, about his life, career and influences at the Blenheim Palace Literary Festival at Blenheim Palace in Woodstock yesterday +8
David Cameron gives the Inaugural Duke of Gloucester Lecture, about his life, career and influences at the Blenheim Palace Literary Festival at Blenheim Palace in Woodstock yesterday
It was initially conceived as a vehicle for helping male undergraduates to hook up with their female peers.

‘The idea was to throw these really high camp fancy-dress parties to get all the girls to dress in very little,’ Guinness later recalled. ‘Even though it pretended to be very camp, it was really heterosexual.’ From the outset, the Society had six principal members, known as ‘masters’, who assumed titles such as Poker, Dispenser and (more recently) Britney Tears.

Each master has a ‘minion’ — a younger student — who moves up in rank once he graduates. In the meantime, they are supposed to pick up tips on party organising.

They are almost always male, though a few years ago the Society ‘tapped up’, or elected, its first female member: an undergraduate called Jess Ruben.

Though initially unknown outside of Oxbridge circles, the wider public became aware of the Piers Gaveston Society in 1983, when a young photographer called Dafydd Jones won a prestigious prize for a collection of striking black-and-white images of Oxford dining clubs.

It included several shots of the young Hugh Grant wearing a leopardskin vest and hotpants at a Piers Gaveston Society ball at the Park Lane hotel in 1983. Also there was Nigella Lawson.

‘Piers Gaveston now has a reputation for being debauched, but at the time its events were quite civilised,’ Jones now recalls.

‘There was never any music, it was instead a lot of excited, young university students in fancy dress.

‘There was no open sex or anything like that, and while people did get quite drunk, they stayed pretty respectable.’

The Society’s first brush with notoriety was not, as it happened, until the summer of 1986, when its high-profile member Count Gottfried von Bismarck — the 22-year-old great-great-grandson of Prince Otto, Prussia’s famous Iron Chancellor — awoke one morning to find the body of a female student in his room at Christ Church.

She was Olivia Channon, a 22-year-old socialite whose father, Paul, was a member of Margaret Thatcher’s Cabinet.

David Cameron smiles as he leaves after an emergency EU heads of state summit on the migrant crisis at the EU Council building in Brussels on Thursday +8
David Cameron smiles as he leaves after an emergency EU heads of state summit on the migrant crisis at the EU Council building in Brussels on Thursday
A post-mortem examination revealed that she had choked on her own vomit, having overdosed on heroin.

Newspaper coverage of the scandal was illustrated with pictures of Gottfried — who would die of an overdose in 2007 — dressed as a nun at a Piers Gaveston party.

It also included group photos with his close university friend Viscount Althorp (now Earl Spencer) the brother of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Over the ensuing years (coincidentally, the time David Cameron was at Oxford) the Society remained below the radar.

But by the early Nineties, its increasingly lavish events had once more become a fixture of the gossip columns.

In 1993, for example, the Evening Standard reported that ‘200 giddy youths — many of them brandishing such necessary accessories as bullwhips and chains’ had attended its summer party at Sir Francis Dashwood’s West Wycombe estate.

Guests included Toby Rowland, son of the entrepreneur Tiny, who was wearing a studded dog collar and a skirt, wrote the newspaper.

As to the party? ‘It’s a cross between the Bacchic orgies of ancient Greece and a Caracas brothel,’ its correspondent reported, adding that: ‘Toby helped entertain a ripe young woman teasingly clad in leopardskin hotpants.’

These days, Rowland is a well-known technology entrepreneur who co-founded the firm that invented the hugely successful Candy Crush smartphone game.

The following year, the Evening Standard reported that ‘Lord Rothschild’s boy Nat led the way’ at the bash, ‘giving an exemplary performance as the High Priest of Pain, in so doing delighting Emily Mortimer [daughter of Rumpole author John and now a Hollywood actress]’.

Today, Rothschild is a billionaire famed for being thrashed with birch twigs while sharing a sauna with the then EU commissioner Lord Mandelson during a 2005 trip to Russia. Perhaps he got the idea from one of the Piers Gaveston bashes.

Other guests during the mid-Nineties included the future Tory MP Rory Stewart.

In 1998, meanwhile, the event was infiltrated by two undercover reporters from the News of the World. ‘Depraved, drunk, some half-naked, others squeezed into rubber bondage gear, many drugged to the eyeballs — the nation’s future leaders showed their true colours,’ read its report, describing ‘an orgy of kinky sex’ fuelled by ‘cocaine, ecstasy and booze’.

At the turn of the century, tickets for the event cost £30. Today, it’s three times as much.

Guests this year were required to wire £90 to an unnamed organiser’s bank account in order to secure a place at the party.

In recent years, money from ticket sales has been spent securing the services of a troupe of burlesque dancers from Torture Garden — a London nightspot that dubs itself ‘the world’s leading fetish club’.

It has also helped ensure ever-more lavish decoration of the marquees. To this end, a recent Piers Gaveston party had the theme ‘banquet of chestnuts’, after an ancient Roman feast.

‘The whole venue, including paths leading to the marquees, was decorated with severed pigs’ heads,’ says one of the hired staff who helped to set it up.

‘Some were on spikes, others just left on the ground.

‘Given this week’s events I must stress, however, that I never saw a single guest doing anything unmentionable to one of those pigs’ heads.’

In this, if nothing else, the gilded youths who attend this most debauched of annual events appear to be less adventurous than their illustrious forebears.

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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
Martin Van Creveld: I'll quote Henry Kissinger: "In campaigns like this the antiterror forces lose, because they don't win, and the rebels win by not losing."
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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2015 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

#PigGate

What with meeting Obama and bombing Syria, Vladimir Putin has been very busy lately. Even more so on Facebook. By Nathaniel Tapley.
http://www.thepoke.co.uk/2015/10/01/putins-facebook-page/




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PostPosted: Mon Jan 11, 2016 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow! Churchills, Rothschilds, Kings & Cecil Rhodes
Excellent piece by Nick Mutch


Breaking The Bullingdon Club Omertà: Secret Lives Of The Men Who Run Britain
NICK MUTCH 09Jan16 5:02 AM ET
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/01/09/breaking-the-bullingd on-club-omerta-secret-lives-of-the-men-who-run-britain.html
OXFORD — The tablecloth was drenched in red wine and blood; broken plates littered the floor and a young man in a $5,000 suit lay unconscious.
Strewn across the Tudor room at the luxury Manor hotel in north Oxfordshire was proof that Oxford University’s notorious Bullingdon Club is still raising hell in 2015, despite claims that their excesses had been checked by negative publicity and mortified former members. “They walked in here as if they were the Royal Family”, John Wood, one of the waiters that served them, told The Daily Beast. “One half were drinking themselves silly, the other half smashing up the crockery.”
The 15 students were served 24 bottles of red wine, 24 bottles of white wine, and plenty of champagne. The damage they inflicted ran into hundreds of dollars.

After three years as a student at Oxford, this was my first glimpse of the Bullingdon in action as part of an unprecedented investigation into the drinking society’s past and present, which is based on discoveries from the archives and interviews with recent and former club members.
Three of the most powerful men in Britain today—the prime minister, the chancellor of the Exchequer, and the mayor of London—were all members, joining an illustrious list of alumni that includes ambassadors, countless CEOs, titans of the financial industry, and four kings. Because the members swear a code of silence, or “omertà,” when initiated, the club has been shrouded in mystery until now.
The night at the Manor began at around half past nine on a cold night in February, a beaten up minibus arrived at the hotel in Weston on the Green, north Oxfordshire. They swaggered out, tipsy from the Dom Pérignon they’d enjoyed on the ride. They’d been picked up from a secret location on Walton Street in the Oxford suburb of Jericho wearing their outfits from Oxford tailor Ede and Ravenscroft.

A set of club rules from 1850, found in a small blue booklet with gold embossed letters and yellowed with age, describes the very same outfit they wear to this day. “The Uniform of the club,” it says, “shall consist of a Blue Tie, Blue Coat, Brass Buttons, Buff Waistcoat, Blue Trousers.”
Oxford establishments won’t have them. The Kings Arms, a popular student pub, banned them from entering the building when the Bullingdon boys started a fire in one of the rooms and smashed an antique mirror in 2006. That was just a friendly drink. Their organized events—known as “blinds”—have been banished from the city for more than 100 years. They were ordered not to hold any meetings within 15 miles of central Oxford in 1894 after smashing all 534 windows in Peckwater, a quad in Christ Church, the grandest of Oxford’s colleges.
Among this year’s vintage were the sons of some of Britain’s wealthiest and best-connected men. Based on the club’s history, one of them could well be ruling Britain within the next few decades.

The Manor is an old English country establishment, built in the 11th century as a monastery, before being gifted by Elizabeth I to Sir Henry Norreys in the 16th century. It is now a luxurious hotel with swimming pools and a tennis court. The living room has heavy armchairs and the Polo Times and Four Shires magazines decorate the table while a fire crackles in the background. Under a false name, the club reserved an oak paneled room with emerald colored walls dominated by a massive mahogany table in the center. The room is a good distance from the main dining hall so that the other guests won’t notice a commotion.
As tradition dictates, the plates soon start flying. “A bunch of pissed up toffs, that’s all they were,” said the waiter. “One of the group cut his hand open, another passed out on the floor. Not that much worse than you’d get from another group of young lads their age.” The damage is relatively affordable this time, around five hundred dollars, on top of the food and drinks, they settled the check in cash. By 11 p.m., the minibus is just around the corner to drive them back into Oxford to continue the night.
Thirty years earlier a group of young men in exactly the same outfits, stumbled out into the early hours of a summer’s day. One of them, Ralph Perry-Robinson, would later describe how they decided to play a prank on another student. They started throwing whatever they could find at his window, while one scaled a drainpipe to try and break in. But one of the group fumbled a pot plant, which crashed through the window of a restaurant below. The terrified student called the police and the group scampered off across nearby Magdalen Bridge to hide in the botanical gardens.
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Three of them, including a young David Cameron, now prime minister, and Boris Johnson, the current mayor of London and one of the favorites to replace Cameron who will stand down before 2020, made their getaway down nearby Queens Lane. The others were tracked down by sniffer dogs and spent a night in the cells of Cowley police station. The tale was recorded in a book of essays published the following year, The Oxford Myth (1988). The story’s author Sebastian Shakespeare, now a journalist at the Daily Mail said Ralph Perry-Robinson no longer takes calls about the club. “Ralph got into terrible trouble with his contemporaries for blabbing to me in that book,” Shakespeare said. “It’s not the done thing. Whenever I remind Mayor Boris about his time in the club, he whispers ‘Omertà, Omertà’ under his breath.”
Cameron would later deny being there that night. He was ambushed by a BBC interviewer who drew uncomfortable parallels between his old club and the actions of disaffected young people during the London riots, for whom Cameron was demanding tough justice. He claimed he had gone to bed early that night, which two sources there on the day claim was “rubbish.” “There is no question Cameron witnessed destruction of property,” one former member told The Daily Beast.
Andrew Gimson, Johnsons’ biographer, told me, “The Bullingdon boys wanted to take greater risks. They thought of themselves as elite, proud of its money and its connections.”
It is obvious why Cameron, who also attended Eton—Britain’s most elite boarding school, wants to disassociate himself from such behavior while his government preaches austerity and national belt-tightening. His claim when he came to power was that cuts to public expenditure would affect the whole of society equally. Despite economic analysis to the contrary, you can still buy a Conservative poster that claims, “We’re all in this together.”
The allegation made against the club is that it shows there is one rule for the rich and another for everyone else.
Two young students, who said they were members of the Bullingdon, reinforced the point on the day Cameron was elected prime minister in 2010. Dressed in suits, ties, and top hats while drinking champagne they unfurled a poster on an Oxfordshire polling booth featuring a photo of Cameron that read “BRITONS, KNOW YOUR PLACE. VOTE ETON-VOTE TORY.”
The people duly obeyed; and Cameron is now in his fifth year as prime minister.
The Bullingdon has been an influential social institution for much longer than previously thought. It was founded as a cricket club in 1780. The first written records show that it never took this seriously. A match register from June 1795 shows the club being thrashed by eight wickets by Marylebone Cricket Club, which established the sport of cricket less than a decade earlier. The following year they lost by 200 runs. By 1846, the register records simply that “Bullingdon gave up the match.”
By then the club had already gained a reputation that caused a University proctor to describe it as “a curse and disgrace to a place of Christian education.” The club’s archival records and photographs are meticulously preserved in the records of former members. A membership roll from the 19th century survives and contains a number of individuals, who have not previously been named as members. They include Lord Halifax, the foreign secretary who was passed over for prime minister by Winston Churchill in 1940; Edward Grey, foreign secretary during World War I; King Frederick VII of Denmark, and Lord Dunglass, father of future prime minister Alec Douglas-Home. Over a 50-year period, the club produced a prime minister, a chancellor of the Exchequer, three foreign secretaries, five First Lords of the Admiralty, around 50 members of parliament and over 100 peers of the realm. Dukes of Norfolk, Northumberland, Westminster, Roxburgh, and Buccleah all appear, sitting next to more familiar names such as King Edward VIII; Douglas Haig, Commander of the Allied Forces in World War I; Randolph Churchill, father of Winston Churchill; and imperialist Cecil Rhodes.
The club’s receipts from this period give some idea of how little their lifestyles have changed. For a single dinner in 1868, the accounts show £56, around $8,000 in today’s money, paid to Henry Purdue and Co. Wine and Spirit Merchants for two cases of champagne, £28 pounds to William Hodgkin for the hire of 10 acres of land, and £33 for travel by horse and carriage around Oxford. After the night, £49 and 18 shillings to J Rickets Carpenter for “repairs executed at the most reasonable terms.” Annual receipts for the year come to a staggering £3000, equivalent to around $350,000 in modern money. The first surviving photo of the club, from 1861 features a young Prince of Wales in the center. Another picture from 1867 shows club president Archibald Primrose, later the 5th Earl of Rosebery and prime minister of the United Kingdom, standing in the center with arms folded and a smirk on his face. One hundred and twenty years later, another future prime minister, David Cameron, would take his place.
On the wall of the tailor Ede and Ravenscroft is a blurred photo of the club from 1925. It features members including Lord Longford, Labour leader of the House of Lords, Hugh Lucas-Tooth, then the youngest ever MP at 21, and Roger Lumley, the Grandmaster of the British Freemasons. It was these men who Evelyn Waugh satirized in Decline and Fall as the “Bollinger Club.” He called them “epileptic royalty from their villas of exile; uncouth peers from crumbling country seats; smooth young men of uncertain tastes from embassies and legations; illiterate lairds from wet granite hovels in the Highlands.”
Mike Bignell, an amateur historian who was a member of the Gridiron Club in the 1970s and knew the Bullingdon members well, points out one figure from the 1976 photo. “I knew him at college. He ended up getting kicked out of Christ Church for doing no work. But before that, he missed a tutorial and gave the excuse that he was having lunch with the Queen. Thinking they had him, his tutors phoned up Buckingham Palace, only to find that he was telling them truth.”
The real treasure at Ede and Ravenscroft lies at the back of the shop, behind a low door in the wall. This is the Bullingdon Club’s secret photo archive, which stretches back 80 years, showing dozens of images of young men posing in tie and tailcoat on the stone steps of Christ Church’s Canterbury Quad including many of hitherto unknown members. One photo, from 1951, shows the former provost of Eton and ambassador to the United States, Anthony Acland, as well as the former governor of the Bank of England, Robin Leigh Pemberton. This includes the original copy of a notorious image from 1987, which show a sultry looking Cameron and Johnson posing with eight other young men. The shot was originally printed in James Hanning and Francis Elliot’s 2007 biography of Cameron, but the photography company, Gilman and Soame, quickly prohibited the dissemination—alleging copyright infringement. Many suspect that the Conservative Party had a hand in this. Gilman and Soame had no problem allowing the publication of a photo they own of then Labour leader Ed Miliband in white tie academic dress, which was widely published just before the last election.
Another photo on the wall of the tailor shows an equally notorious image of Chancellor George Osborne, while another previously unpublished photo from 1988 shows David Cameron occupying the position of club president, chest puffed out and a sneering smile on his face. But you can now no longer view these photos. After their existence became known, the tailor told me that it was now a “staff only bathroom.” When I asked whether the photo of the PM in the back had anything to do with this, he winced slightly and replied: “Well, yes and no.”
One of the Bullingdon boys from that era, let’s call him James, agreed to meet me for lunch. He greets me in a gruff antipodean accent in a café down the road from Buckingham Palace. With a slightly open shirt, and a scraggly beard, he says he doesn’t want to be named because “honestly, I regret it deeply.” He believes he is the only member in over 20 years to not have come from a private school.
Over a meal of smoked salmon and black coffee, James tells me about a club dinner in 1986 where the club hired a boat on which they drank 1895 Armagnac as well as innumerable bottles of champagne. He now has serious misgivings about the club, but described this night, also attended by the “witty, charming, and already ferociously ambitious young Boris Johnson” as one of the most spectacular of his life.
The selection process he describes is simple enough. A candidate must be proposed and seconded, but if he is not a “sound enough fellow” he can be black balled.
The initiation rites, which Johnson and Cameron participated in, have become the stuff of legend. One member told me how current members will still “trash” the room of the person they will initiate, spraying the walls with champagne, tearing photographs, and cutting up mattresses. Radek Sikorski, an Oxford classmate of Johnson in the ’80s, and later foreign minister of Poland, told Gimson how he endured the ritual. At the end of it, he shook Johnson’s hand and was told “Congratulations man, you have been chosen.” Despite claims that these rituals were a thing of the past, one member who joined recently returned to find his room trashed and a set of directions to place a certain part of his body into the mouth of a dead pig, inspired by Cameron’s alleged indiscretions.
The number of members varies between around 10 to 20 and includes a president, treasurer, and secretary. They hold three or four major events per year, including the summer dinner and the buller brekker.
The “brekker” is the most licentious event of the year. At the time of Cameron and Johnson’s membership, Perry-Robinson described one of their breakfast events in 1986: “We always hire whores… prostitutes were paid extra by members who wanted to use them.” But, he admitted, “there is not really much point in hiring a prostitute if you consume two bottles of champagne” and “if you have 12 friends standing around, it takes quite an effort of will to go for it.”
After these events is when the notorious room smashing occurs. An old article found in the archives of the Oxford Student newspaper has one member recalling how they took pleasure in inviting a string band to a party before proceeding to destroy all their instruments, including a priceless Stradivarius violin. Another member, at a party at L’Ortolan in Berkshire, ate his wine glass along with his Michelin starred meal. A current member described similar scenes, except that last year’s celebrations took place in a hotel in Amsterdam.
Several of those in the Bullingdon this year agreed to speak off the record. Already, they were worried about the effect of the Bullingdon on their reputations. “Is [the story] a name and shame?” one of them asked me. The most damaging recent allegation claimed that a club member burned a £50 note in front of a tramp. “Can you make clear that this isn’t true… that kind of thing would never happen,” one recent member tells me. While the Bullingdon members have an obvious reason to want to clear their names, I couldn’t find any evidence that this ever took place, and the original article on the Huffington Post has since been retracted and replaced with a note saying it was an “unfounded allegation.”
James has had longer to reflect on the nature of his regrets. “Everyone does stupid stuff when they are young,” he tells me, “but the Bullingdon was different.” He remembered having fond memories of several fellow members, but believed that the destruction was organized and run by a core of members, including Darius Guppy and Gottfried von Bismarck, who he called as a “complete sociopath. One of the scariest people I’ve ever met, with no moral conscience whatsoever.” Bismarck was known in Oxford for dinners in which pig heads were served and became internationally notorious after Olivia Channon, the daughter of a Conservative minister at the time, died after ingesting a lethal cocktail of alcohol, cocaine, and heroin in his Christ Church room.
James recalled one incident where a fellow club member had surreptitiously urinated in a jug of port in a college bar, before calling over a waitress asking why it “tasted off.” “She returned a few minutes later and snarled ‘you people are the most disgusting people I’ve ever met, get out of here now.’ I saw the look of disgust on her face, as well as the smug grin on his, and decided that I’d had enough. I never wanted anyone to look at me like that again. So I got out.”
James tells me about a culture of “institutionalized bad behavior where you are rewarded for getting drunk and doing as much damage as possible.” In almost every case, they suffer no lasting consequences. The Bullingdon trash pubs, start fights, and drink themselves into a coma, before paying everyone off with wads of cash. In 1913, The New York Times reported that after a particularly destructive night, the members were called in front of a proctor and “it was believed they were to be sent down [expelled]… to the surprise of Oxford, the proctor only imposed a fine of £5 each.” This is a recurring theme in the club’s history. In 2001, Tony Clark, a Labour MP told Parliament about “a bunch of drunken toffs who caused mayhem… leaving a marquee covered in broken crockery, splintered tables, and the bodies of Buller men wearing tweed suits” which included Tom Lawson, son of former Chancellor Nigel Lawson. Despite the fact that 30 policemen arrived to deal with the party “they let the rich kids off with a caution.”
In 2004, landlord Ian Rodgers told BBC Radio 4 how a group of Oxford students, which included Princess Diana’s nephew Alexander Fellowes, had trashed his pub during a meal. “I called the police and told them that I wanted them all prosecuted. But when I called the next day, they had let them all go with a fine.” A Bullingdon member who was there described Rodgers as having “no sense of humor.”
In 2011, the Daily Mail reported that the Bullingdon President Nick Green had allegedly assaulted his ex-girlfriend’s new lover so ferociously that he was taken to hospital. Green declined to give an interview. He said: “Nothing good can come from talking about the Bullingdon.” He was not asked about the alleged assault by The Daily Beast, although the Daily Mail reported at the time that his lawyers had declined to comment. He was never arrested or charged.
Perhaps, the most shocking event occurred in 1977. Bartholomew Smith, son of a former Conservative MP, who was pictured next to the future Dukes of Norfolk, Northumberland, and Buccleah caused a three-car pile up while driving his Maserati. An expert witness at his trial claimed that he had been driving at “maniacal” speed and was “considerably intoxicated” after a club dinner. He killed four people, including Chelsea footballer Peter Houseman and his wife. Despite being convicted of dangerous driving causing death and having four previous driving convictions, he got off with a driving ban and a fine.
In 1909, Winston Churchill summed the situation up with characteristic bombast. Lord Winterton, a former member, was opposing clemency for young offenders leaving Churchill to surmise: “7000 lads of the poorer classes are sent to gaol every year for offenses which, if the noble Lord had committed them at college, he would not have been subjected to the slightest degree of inconvenience.”
When Cameron demanded “tough justice” for young criminals after the London riots more than a century later, Churchill was no longer on hand to point out the hypocrisy.
While the club’s political connections are well known, its association with the worlds of banking and international business are even more striking. The Baring banking family has a long association with the club. The first Baring on record is Thomas Baring, Earl of Northbrook, from a register in 1846. He later went on to be Viceroy of India and First Lord of the Admiralty. Mark Francis Baring, son of the former Chair of BP, Lord Ashburton, is the most recent, and can be seen in the 1980 photo. The club records count nine other members of the family. The heads of the Rothschild banking family, Jacob and his son Nathaniel, were both members. For all Winston Churchill’s admonitions about the club’s hypocrisy, his grandson Rupert Soames, now CEO of outsourcing giant Serco, which recently won millions of pounds in government contracts, was also a member, although there is no suggestion that those contracts were not awarded through the correct channels. The amount of wealth and power concentrated in former club members is staggering, with Jacob Rothschild alone estimated to be worth more than $7 billion.
Membership of the Bullingdon gives access to an incomparable alumni network. You can find photos of Boris Johnson posing with recent president Nick Green in 2013, or George Osborne attending a Bullingdon Club event in 1997, while already working for Prime Minister John Major. Thirty years after running from the police together, Jonathan Ford would contribute to a Financial Times editorial endorsing his old Buller friend Cameron in the 2015 general election, after saying Labour were “too preoccupied with inequality.” Although in April 2010, shortly after Ford had joined the FT as Chief Leader writer, the newspaper published an exclusive interview with a member of Cameron’s old club who gave a markedly different view on why Cameron should become prime minister. “We always thought we were going to be running the country,” he said. “We talked of who would be the one to lead the Conservative Party when the time came.”
After Cameron became the chosen one, he appointed his friend from the Buller, George Osborne as his Chancellor—Britain’s second most powerful position. Cameron also welcomed Boris Johnson into the Cabinet in the summer. They had been among six members of the ’87 club who reportedly gathered for a reunion in 2008 to fundraise for Johnson’s earlier successful campaign to be mayor of London. Fellow member Sebastian James, CEO of Dixons Carphone, a tech company worth over £3.8billion, was appointed to head a Government panel overseeing state school spending.
Not every Bullingdon story ends so happily. Von Bismarck was found dead at the age of 44 in his $7.5 million London flat. The post-mortem concluded that he had the highest level of cocaine in his system the coroner had ever seen, along with Hepatitis B and C, liver cirrhosis, and HIV. Darius Guppy ended up in jail for fraud. Another member, Henry Percy, later the Duke of Northumberland, died after an amphetamine overdose in 1995. “That’s why Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited is such a great novel about Oxford. It’s not really about the grandeur. It’s about the disillusionment. Sebastian Flyte ends up drinking himself to oblivion,” said James.
One well-placed Oxford student told me that the club has had a recruiting problem for some time. Because of the huge publicity surrounding the club, the kind of people who want to join are those who want the publicity; an attribute, which in itself, should preclude one from being “sound” enough to be a member. There are other, more respectable societies now, such as the Gridiron, the Stoics or the Frat, which have the Bullingdon parties without the intense scrutiny. The truly ambitious now choose those. One student, well connected in Oxford politics told me that “I can’t understand why so many people I like so much on a personal level get involved with such a nasty institution.” But such is the stigma of the club that he did not want to be named in this piece even on such a tangential level. One young woman remembered with a grimace how a club member took her to a fancy dinner at a country estate, before attempted to court her with the line “you could be Mrs. Buller.”
Jeremy Catto, a retired Oxford history don, believes the more recent Bullingdon members are not living up to their grand history. “They have become lazy,” he said. “In the past they drove sports cars, today they only meet to eat and drink, probably not one of them has learned to sit properly on a horse.”
In modern day Oxford they can be found in a nightclub called the Bridge, close to the train station. One night earlier this year, some friends and I went up the stairs, past a throng of people, and through an entranceway that opens into a VIP room. We sat down at the largest table, which was surrounded by a red rope.
In 2013, Orme Alexander Clarke, a former club member, reportedly let off a firework in this club’s smoking area area, but no charges were ever brought. One witness to the event told me that he had done it because “he knew they would get away with it.”
A few Bullingdon members were sitting around us, some glared but none addressed us, so we poured some champagne and a little Grey Goose. Despite their fearsome reputation, they seemed unsure about what to do when people didn’t scurry out of their way at a second’s notice.
“Hey man, why are we letting them do this?” one grumbled. “I don’t know, why are we?” another snapped back, before turning back to stare at his phone. Eventually, they slink off into the rest of the club.
In Brideshead, Anthony Blanche is disappointed on meeting the club in person and realizing that their reputation is more braggadocio than bravery. “The louder they shouted, the shyer they seemed,” he said. He soon realized that their scrapes as students would be boasted about and exaggerated for decades until “they are all married to scraggy little women like hens and have cretinous porcine sons like themselves getting drunk at the same club dinner in the same coloured coats.”
Harking back to overblown accounts “their barnyard daughters will snigger and think their father was quite a dog in his day, and what a pity he’s grown so dull.”

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2016 11:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

More from Nick Mutch from last September in the Independent
Alternative headline for above article
Blood & Hookers in Britain's Secret Club by Nick ... - The Daily Beast 2016Jan09


What the top Tories really got up to at Oxford

Claims about the PM’s youthful 'debauchery' have raised eyebrows this week, but do they reflect reality?
Nick Mutch Friday 25 September 201519 comments
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/what-the-top-tories-real ly-got-up-to-at-oxford-10517371.html

After delving into a variety of dusty archives and contemporary sources, here is the truth behind the headlines.

Sexual escapades at the Piers Gaveston society

The secretive Piers Gaveston dining club was the setting of the most lurid allegations about David Cameron in Lord Ashcroft’s book. Insight into the club’s debauchery is provided by a chapter in a little-known 1988 book called The Oxford Myth, edited by Boris Johnson’s sister, Rachel.



The chapter, written by Sebastian Shakespeare, now a noted national paper diarist, described how “the Piers Gaveston society… is notorious not only for drunkenness but for its patently homosexual behaviour”.



Balliol-College-Getty.jpg
A woman rides past Balliol College


It continued: “A meeting was recently held at the residence of a rich South African who lives in Oxford. Desperate to be accepted socially, he agreed to host the event ... however, his house was seriously trashed. A guest who jokingly whipped a pile of writhing bodies was chased into the loo where he bolted the door, though it was battered down within minutes and he was debagged.” De-bagging is Oxbridge slang for removing someone’s trousers as a punishment.

“Whenever someone achieved a sexual feat a hunting horn would be sounded,” Shakespeare went on. “A member disclosed that one of the crowning experiences of his Oxford days was having an oyster in cream sauce licked out of his navel, though he could not remember by whom.”

Heroin at the dinner table

Another chapter of The Oxford Myth, by Allegra Mostyn-Owen, then fiancée of Boris Johnson, is candid about the presence of hard drugs at Piers Gaveston parties. “Back in 1981, a surprisingly large number of students seemed to be dabbling in heroin,” she writes. “Decadence was considered fashionable and cool.” Quoting a friend who was a prominent figure in the society, she continued: “You felt that you should exploit your mind, that you were not stuck in prejudice, that you were grasping something beyond the mundane.” And she gives an intriguing hint that some of these heroin users went on to take places at the heart of the Establishment: “Very few of them actually became addicted, and most of them are now comfortably off in the professions.”

Sexual familiarity – and a pig’s head

The allegation that Cameron inserted part of his anatomy into the head of a dead pig generated the most headlines this week. But it also met with some scepticism, with many contemporaries suggesting that it seemed a tale too far. However, Rachel Johnson’s own chapter in her book, titled “Sex”, shows that at least one pig’s head was procured for an undergraduate prank. “The new familiarity between the sexes has bred some contempt,” she recounts. “An Oriel girl came back to her room late one night to find a freshly decapitated pigs head on her desk.”



cameron-reuters.jpg
The majority of the British public believes the Pig Gate claims


Boris Johnson on political tactics and ‘lonely girls’

The future Mayor of London contributed a chapter on student politics to his sister’s book, which makes fascinating reading for admirers of the machinations that helped secure his subsequent rise towards the top of the Conservative Party. Giving advice to would-be presidents of the Oxford Union (a position he held in 1986), Boris stresses the importance of building a “disciplined and deluded collection of stooges” to do the candidate’s bidding.

“When a candidate has accumulated enough stooges from the major voting colleges, he is deemed to have a machine.” On the recruitment of stooges, he says: “A candidate will use a variety of means to knit the loyalty of his stooge. He may take you out to lunch with his mother. He may dangle before you membership of some alluring club. If you are of the opposite sex, the candidate will flirt with grim extravagance.”

But, he added, the “brutal fact” of the relationship is that it is always “founded on duplicity”.

He adds that “lonely girls from the women’s colleges” who “back their largely male candidates with a porky decisiveness” are particularly coveted by student politicians. “For these young women, machine politics offers human friction and warmth.”



Boris-Johnson-young-man.png
A young Boris Johnson


Predicting his own (and Cameron’s) future political success, he adds that the “most natural” politicians come from “the Establishment”. This he describes as a “loosely knit confederation of middle-class undergraduates, invariably public school, who share the same accents and snobberies, and who meet each other at the same parties. If you are a member of the Establishment, you will know it. You cannot be recruited.”

Boris and the incident with the screwdriver

A cryptic diary entry in Cherwell, the Oxford student newspaper, hints at Boris’s passionate nature. It reads: “Drama! Action! Excitement! The Union last Thursday. Boris Johnson, librarian, angered by the jokes of Graham Davies. Davies, ex President of the Cambridge Union, enjoying the company of Emma Henkings. Boris approaching Graham, screwdriver in hand. Glazed fear in Davies’ eyes as he grips his glass. ‘Sorry,’ mutters Johnson. ‘This is all very silly.’”

The future Minister for Universities’ guide to fresher’s week parties (and amphetamines)

An advice column co-written for the student magazine Isis by Jo Johnson, Boris’s younger brother, in 1992 makes for illuminating reading, given his current job of Minister of State for Universities and Science. Much of his guidance is unimpeachable. “Do not drink from what look like unnoticed bottles … they have been used as an ash tray or peed into.”

But current Oxford dons may not take kindly to the minister’s description of their drinks parties. “Outside of tutorial, dons are sincerely uninterested in their pupils ... but sadly they have to get together with their colleagues to host departmental drinks parties for the idiots they have to teach,” he writes. “The heterosexual ones take to paying close attention to their female pupils, offering them extra tutorials.”



greenpaperplans.jpg
Jo Johnson (L) says speaks to PM David Cameron


The article is illustrated with a picture of some amphetamine powder, a recreational drug, with the caption “The solution?”.

Restaurant-trashing and the Assassins Club

An Oxford Mail front page dated 23 September 1982 and headlined “The Bistro Assassins” reported on a group of hell-raising Oxford students who got their kicks out of getting drunk, smashing up restaurants and then trying to pay their way out of trouble after causing £560 worth of damage to Thatchers Bistro in Thame.

They reportedly told police it was “part of a good night’s fun”.

The article says that members of the club were fined for being drunk and disorderly and for obstructing police. Officers at the scene had found “vomit on the carpets … curtains ripped from the rails … food smeared all over the walls …wine bottles smashed against the wall.”

Similarities with the Bullingdon are not exactly a coincidence: a Bullingdon Club photo from 1982 shows several members who had belonged to the Assassins Club.

In The Oxford Myth, writing just six years later, Sebastian Shakespeare lamented: “The Assassins gained considerable publicity in the late 1970s because of their rowdy behaviour and restaurant-wrecking, but their meetings today tend to be rather low-key affairs and last summer they convened in a private house. Smashing up a restaurant has become too predictable and embarrassing, and the presence of women has contributed to the dilution of boyish joie de vivre.”

Michael Gove buys a slave

Senior figures in the Oxford Union, including Boris Johnson and Michael Gove, participated in a mock “slave auction”. Gove, now Secretary of State for Justice, bought the then Union president Jessica Pulay for £6, according to an account of the auction published in a student paper. Boris was sold in his absence, while Gove himself was purchased for £35, after attracting “enthusiastic bidding”.

Jeremy Hunt and the Contras

The Cherwell student newspaper accounts how, while president of the Conservative Association in 1987, Jeremy Hunt, now the Health Secretary, found himself at the centre of a political storm after two of his colleagues on the society’s executive committee organised a dinner for Adolfo Calero, a leading member of the American-backed Contra rebels who fought Nicaragua’s revolutionary Sandinista government. Hunt and his colleagues were publicly accused of harming the Conservative Party by extending “invitations to terrorists” in a resignation letter from a local Tory official, Andrew Foulsham. Responding to Cherwell, Hunt insisted that “the fears attributed to Andrew Foulsham are grossly exaggerated”.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 2016 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pure Theatre
Boris Johnson holding old school pal David Cameron to ransom over EU referendum
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/boris-johnson-holding-old-school-7409677

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2016 10:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Defence procurement minister Philip Dunne is also from Cameron's Bullingdon Club


EXCLUSIVE- "WE SMASHED PLATES AND FURNITURE, BUT AS POLITELY AS POSSIBLE." NEW TOP TORY MINISTER IN THE BULLINGDON CLUB.
Nick Mutch photo Nick MutchLondon, UK04 Jan. 2016
https://www.byline.com/project/30/article/699

EXCLUSIVE- "We smashed plates and furniture, but as politely as possible." New Top Tory Minister in the Bullingdon Club.
Byline reveals another Bullingdon photo, this one featuring Tory Minister Philip Dunne, side by side with aristocrats, bankers and top lawyers. A contemporary describes them as making sure they were always polite as they destroyed other peoples property.
Just before May's General Election, Byline exclusively revealed a never before seen photo of David Cameron at the centre of the Bullingdon Club. Today, we reveal a new photo of a Top Tory in his full regalia. This is the first of a number of photos of club members I will be publishing on Byline over the coming weeks.

On the far left of the front row is Old Etonian Philip Dunne, MP for Ludlow and current Minister for Defence Procurement. Son of the former Lord Lieutenant of Hertfordshire, Dunne was first elected to Parliament in 2005, and was an early supporter of David Cameron's campaign for the Conservative Party leadership.

Mark Baring, a member of this iteration of the club, recently gave an on the record interview to Der Spiegel, where he said the following;
"I suppose you could say it's very unattractive, particularly by people who, you know, had every advantage in their life. … In my experience, it didn't really get horrendously out of hand. Yes, we would sometimes break plates or furniture or whatever, but we tried to be as polite as we could be to the people whose establishments we were in."
The dinners were "riotous," says Baring in his kitchen. Spending one's evenings in this way was not unusual in Oxford, he explains. "Sometimes we hired strippers." He sees nothing wrong with the club's activities and points out that there are probably similar clubs "on the other side of the social divide."
This photos other members include:

Valentine Guinness- Son of the 3rd Baron Moyne and heir to part of the Guinness brewing fortune, Guinness's other Oxford exploits including founding the Piers Gaveston society, well known for it's allegedly drug fuelled raves. A Piers Gaveston party is supposedly the setting for Lord Ashcroft's allegations about David Cameron's indiscretions with a pigs head. He is also the grandson of Sir Oswald Mosley's wife Diana Mitford.
Mark Baring- Son of Lord Ashburton, the former Chair of British Petroleum, and now a trustee of the Baring Foundation. The Baring family has a long history in the Club- Thomas Baring, later Viceroy of India and First Lord of the Admiralty, appears in a club register from 1846.
Jonathan Cavendish- The Hollywood producer is the co-owner of Imaginarium Studios with actor Andy Serkis, best known for playing Gollum in the Lord of the Rings films. Cavendish was previously a producer on the Bridget Jones films, which he worked on with fellow Oxford students Hugh Grant and Richart Curtis.
Patrick Lawrence, 5th Baron Trevethin- A QC and Barrister at 4 New Square, Lawrence was recently elected to the House of Lords as a crossbench peer. His mother was secretary to Poet Laureate John Betjeman, and his father John Oaksey was a celebrated amateur jockey, broadcaster and racing commentatorfor the Sunday Telegraph.
Hylton Murray-Philipson- An Etonian and graduate of Oriel College, Murray-Philipson was the CEO of New York investment bank Henry Ansbacher. He is the founder of investment firm Wingate Ventures. He is also a friend of Prince Charles, serving as a Senior Adviser to the Prince's Rainforest Project.

David John Ogily, Lord Ogilvy- Heir of the 13th Earl of Airlee. His father was previously Lord Chamberlian, whose duties included arranging the funeral of Princess Diana. His mother Virginia Ogilvy is Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Elizabeth II and accompanies her on high profile state visits.

Philip Douglas Astor- The Barrister at Temple Garden Chambers is younger brother of Baron Astor, Under Secretary of State for Defence and the grandson of Field Marshal Douglas Haig. He is married to Justine Picardie, the editor of Harpers Bazaar.

Nicholas Leese- Chairman of Singapore based nutritional supplement company Global Active Ltd. Leese was caught up an alleged bribery scandal in 1996 after an investigation by now defunct retailer Littlewoods. He was charged by the Singapore Foriegn Corrupt Practices Investigation bureau with 250 counds of fraud, but the charges were thrown out by a judge. Leese described them as 'ridiculous.'
Hugo de Ferranti- An art dealer at Hazlitt Holland Hibbert, described by Tatler as 'incredibly well connected' and 'a chap from a long line of chaps'. Son of Sebastian de Ferranti, chairman of electronics giant Ferranti. His former flame Amanda Harlech has also been romantically linked to actor Ralph Fiennes.

James Blount- A former Diplomat with the Foriegn Office who specialized in kidnap and ransom negotiations in Latin America, he was country head for Iraq of private security contractor Control Risks in 2003 after the US invasion. He was then country head for Libya This company provides protection to businessman from corporate clients such as Halliburton and Bechtel.
Robert Murphy- A Classics graduate and now a senior finance professional at Numitas. He is Chief Financial Officer to a number of tech startups, including iRiS Software, AirPortr and Assembley Studio's Ltd.

Charles Cory-Wright- A QC and Barrister with 39 Essex Chambers. He is Chair of the Personal Injuries Bar Association and recently successfully defended Football Club Everton FC against a serious professional negligence case from one of it's youth side.
Mark Hill-Reid- A financial services consultant specializing in the US Equity Bond market and Company Director at Oceanus (Salcombe) Ltd.

Anthony Brockbank- Partner at law firm Field Fisher Waterhouse, specializing in corporate law and mergers and acquisitions.
Richard Posgate- Co-CEO of Aon Benfield EMEA, the global reinsurance arm of Aon Plc.
Roger Lambert- Chair of Corporate Broking at Canaccord Genuity Ltd.

Myles Brockbank- Head of Equity Sales and Director at Evolution Securities China Limited.

D J Morrison- This remains the only name on this list I have been unable to identify.



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Philip Dunne in the Bullingdon Club
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2018 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Life in Whips Office' (1995) featuring Geoffrey Dickins MP

Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-t-iRQOSeQ
Michael Cockerall documentary Life in Whips Office May 1995 featuring Geoffrey Dickens MP

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