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BAe & Saudi Arabian Prince Bandar bankrolling terror
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insidejob
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 8:34 pm    Post subject: BAe & Saudi Arabian Prince Bandar bankrolling terror Reply with quote

Is the British arms industry, of which BAE Systems is the biggest single business, the enemy within?

Why would BAE give Prince Bandar £1bn for doing nothing?

And why would Blair stop the investigation into arms corruption and Saudi Arabia on the basis that it threatens the security work the Saudis do against terrorists, when we’re always being told that Saudi Arabia finances Islamic extremism?

Well, perhaps, we now know of one method of financing for Al Qaeda.

That’s right, a hefty chunk of that £1bn helped was, no doubt, used to finance them.




http://thinkprogress.org/2007/02/25/hersh-qaeda/
HERSH: U.S. FUNDS BEING SECRETLY FUNNELED TO VIOLENT AL QAEDA-LINKED GROUPS
New Yorker columnist Sy Hersh says the “single most explosive” element of his latest article involves an effort by the Bush administration to stem the growth of Shiite influence in the Middle East (specifically the Iranian government and Hezbollah in Lebanon) by funding violent Sunni groups.

Hersh says the U.S. has been “pumping money, a great deal of money, without congressional authority, without any congressional oversight” for covert operations in the Middle East where it wants to “stop the Shiite spread or the Shiite influence.” Hersh says these funds have ended up in the hands of “three Sunni jihadist groups” who are “connected to al Qaeda” but “want to take on Hezbollah.”

Hersh summed up his scoop in stark terms: “We are simply in a situation where this president is really taking his notion of executive privilege to the absolute limit here, running covert operations, using money that was not authorized by Congress, supporting groups indirectly that are involved with the same people that did 9/11.” Watch it:


Hersh added, “All of this should be investigated by Congress, by the way, and I trust it will be. In my talking to membership — members there, they are very upset that they know nothing about this. And they have great many suspicions.”

Digg It!

Transcript:

BLITZER: Near the end of your article, you have this explosive point in there about John Negroponte, who is now going to be the deputy secretary of state, as opposed to the head of U.S. intelligence.

You write this: “I was subsequently told by the two government consultants and the former senior intelligence officials that the echoes of Iran-Contra were a factor in Negroponte’s decision to resign from the National Intelligence directorship and accept the position of deputy secretary of state.”

Explain what you were hearing, because that is obviously a very explosive charge.

HERSH: Yes. It is probably the single most explosive, if you will, or depressing — or distressing sort of thing I discovered in the last few months, which is simply this. This administration has made a policy change, a decision that they are going to put all of the pressure they can on the Shiites, that is the Shiite regime in Iran, the Shiite — and they are also doing everything they can to stop Hezbollah — which is Shiite, the Hezbollah organization from getting any control or any more of a political foothold in Lebanon.

So they essentially, I quote the — I saw Nasrallah, the head of Hezbollah, and he described it this way, as “fitna (ph),” the Arab word for “civil war.” As far as he is concerned, we are interested in recreating what is happening in Iraq in Lebanon, that is Sunni versus Shia. And in looking into that story, and I saw him in December, I found this. THAT WE HAVE BEEN PUMPING MONEY, A GREAT DEAL OF MONEY, WITHOUT CONGRESSIONAL AUTHORITY, WITHOUT ANY CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT, PRINCE BANDAR OF SAUDI ARABIA IS PUTTING UP SOME OF THIS MONEY, FOR COVERT OPERATIONS IN MANY AREAS OF THE MIDDLE EAST WHERE WE THINK THAT THE — WE WANT TO STOP THE SHIITE SPREAD OR THE SHIITE INFLUENCE.

They call it the “Shiite Crescent.” And a lot of this money, and I can’t tell you with absolute certainty how — exactly when and how, but this money has gotten into the hands — among other places, in Lebanon, into the hands of three — at least three jihadist groups. There are three Sunni jihadist groups whose main claim to fame inside Lebanon right now is that they are very tough. These are people connected to al Qaeda who want to take on Hezbollah. So this government, at the minimum, we may not directly be funneling money to them, but we certainly know that these groups exist.

My government, which arrests al Qaeda every place it can find them and send — some of them are in Guantanamo and other places, is sitting back while the Lebanese government we support, the government of Prime Minister Siniora, is providing arms and sustenance to three jihadist groups whose sole function, seems to me and to the people that talk to me in our government, to be there in case there is a real shoot-’em-up with Hezbollah and we really get into some sort of serious major conflict between the Sunni government and Hezbollah, which is largely Shia, who are basically — or as you know, there is a coalition headed by Hezbollah that is challenging the government right now, demonstrations, sit-ins.

There has been some violence. So America, my country, without telling Congress, using funds not appropriated, I don’t know where, by my sources believe much of the money obviously came from Iraq where there is all kinds of piles of loose money, pools of cash that could be used for covert operations.

All of this should be investigated by Congress, by the way, and I trust it will be. In my talking to membership — members there, they are very upset that they know nothing about this. And they have great many suspicions.

We are simply in a situation where this president is really taking his notion of executive privilege to the absolute limit here, running covert operations, using money that was not authorized by Congress, supporting groups indirectly that are involved with the same people that did 9/11, and we should be arresting these people rather than looking the other way…

BLITZER: And your bottom line, Sy…

HERSH: … and could lead to a real mess…
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 11:44 pm    Post subject: Re: Bandar and financing terror Reply with quote

insidejob wrote:
Why would BAE give Prince Bandar £1bn for doing b* all?

And why would Blair stop the investigation into arms corruption and Saudi Arabia on the basis that it threatens the security work the Saudis do against terrorist, when we’re always being told that Saudi Arabia finances Islamic extremism?

Well, perhaps, we now know of one method of financing for Al Qaeda.

That’s right, a hefty chunk of that £1bn helped was, no doubt, used to finance them.




http://thinkprogress.org/2007/02/25/hersh-qaeda/
HERSH: U.S. FUNDS BEING SECRETLY FUNNELED TO VIOLENT AL QAEDA-LINKED GROUPS
New Yorker columnist Sy Hersh says the “single most explosive” element of his latest article involves an effort by the Bush administration to stem the growth of Shiite influence in the Middle East (specifically the Iranian government and Hezbollah in Lebanon) by funding violent Sunni groups.

Hersh says the U.S. has been “pumping money, a great deal of money, without congressional authority, without any congressional oversight” for covert operations in the Middle East where it wants to “stop the Shiite spread or the Shiite influence.” Hersh says these funds have ended up in the hands of “three Sunni jihadist groups” who are “connected to al Qaeda” but “want to take on Hezbollah.”

Hersh summed up his scoop in stark terms: “We are simply in a situation where this president is really taking his notion of executive privilege to the absolute limit here, running covert operations, using money that was not authorized by Congress, supporting groups indirectly that are involved with the same people that did 9/11.” Watch it:


Hersh added, “All of this should be investigated by Congress, by the way, and I trust it will be. In my talking to membership — members there, they are very upset that they know nothing about this. And they have great many suspicions.”

Digg It!

Transcript:

BLITZER: Near the end of your article, you have this explosive point in there about John Negroponte, who is now going to be the deputy secretary of state, as opposed to the head of U.S. intelligence.

You write this: “I was subsequently told by the two government consultants and the former senior intelligence officials that the echoes of Iran-Contra were a factor in Negroponte’s decision to resign from the National Intelligence directorship and accept the position of deputy secretary of state.”

Explain what you were hearing, because that is obviously a very explosive charge.

HERSH: Yes. It is probably the single most explosive, if you will, or depressing — or distressing sort of thing I discovered in the last few months, which is simply this. This administration has made a policy change, a decision that they are going to put all of the pressure they can on the Shiites, that is the Shiite regime in Iran, the Shiite — and they are also doing everything they can to stop Hezbollah — which is Shiite, the Hezbollah organization from getting any control or any more of a political foothold in Lebanon.

So they essentially, I quote the — I saw Nasrallah, the head of Hezbollah, and he described it this way, as “fitna (ph),” the Arab word for “civil war.” As far as he is concerned, we are interested in recreating what is happening in Iraq in Lebanon, that is Sunni versus Shia. And in looking into that story, and I saw him in December, I found this. THAT WE HAVE BEEN PUMPING MONEY, A GREAT DEAL OF MONEY, WITHOUT CONGRESSIONAL AUTHORITY, WITHOUT ANY CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT, PRINCE BANDAR OF SAUDI ARABIA IS PUTTING UP SOME OF THIS MONEY, FOR COVERT OPERATIONS IN MANY AREAS OF THE MIDDLE EAST WHERE WE THINK THAT THE — WE WANT TO STOP THE SHIITE SPREAD OR THE SHIITE INFLUENCE.

They call it the “Shiite Crescent.” And a lot of this money, and I can’t tell you with absolute certainty how — exactly when and how, but this money has gotten into the hands — among other places, in Lebanon, into the hands of three — at least three jihadist groups. There are three Sunni jihadist groups whose main claim to fame inside Lebanon right now is that they are very tough. These are people connected to al Qaeda who want to take on Hezbollah. So this government, at the minimum, we may not directly be funneling money to them, but we certainly know that these groups exist.

My government, which arrests al Qaeda every place it can find them and send — some of them are in Guantanamo and other places, is sitting back while the Lebanese government we support, the government of Prime Minister Siniora, is providing arms and sustenance to three jihadist groups whose sole function, seems to me and to the people that talk to me in our government, to be there in case there is a real shoot-’em-up with Hezbollah and we really get into some sort of serious major conflict between the Sunni government and Hezbollah, which is largely Shia, who are basically — or as you know, there is a coalition headed by Hezbollah that is challenging the government right now, demonstrations, sit-ins.

There has been some violence. So America, my country, without telling Congress, using funds not appropriated, I don’t know where, by my sources believe much of the money obviously came from Iraq where there is all kinds of piles of loose money, pools of cash that could be used for covert operations.

All of this should be investigated by Congress, by the way, and I trust it will be. In my talking to membership — members there, they are very upset that they know nothing about this. And they have great many suspicions.

We are simply in a situation where this president is really taking his notion of executive privilege to the absolute limit here, running covert operations, using money that was not authorized by Congress, supporting groups indirectly that are involved with the same people that did 9/11, and we should be arresting these people rather than looking the other way…

BLITZER: And your bottom line, Sy…

HERSH: … and could lead to a real mess…


How can you fund a mythical entity thats referred to as the al qaedas?

that article is a lot of bull, until theres a proper enquiry we dont know who did 9/11 right?
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bandar is the same character highlighted in michael moores farenheit 911 as "BANDAR BUSH" because of his close relationship with the Bush family.
Bush himself refers to him as Bandar the Bandit.

Bush and Bandar do play world political games like a game of monopoly but the fact is this moey from BAe was a pretty standard kickback and i dont see why everyone is getting their Alan Whickers in a twist for.
Every single saudi is on the take from the very beginning, when we put that family in charge to run saudi arabia we deliberately made sure they were the most crooked and the most immoral candidates we could have chosen.

Do you honestly not think that every UK contract does not also involve kickbacks? Ofcourse they do. When the NHS contracts have been awarded to United Healthcare, when the London Underground was given to metronet, every single deal has a bribe paid. Since Blair came to power there has been an epidemic.

Forget the saudi deal, that was good for britain, it gave our economy £45billion in revenue, i would pay a billion in bribes for that. Good bit of business on the part of the then trade minister. Now it would be the other way round because now the ministers are only looking to line there own pockets. Today it is blair, prescot, brown, mandelsohn, byers, harman, jowell, blunkett, etc taking the bungs and selling british interests to foreign companies.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


Link

Link

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

stelios wrote:

Forget the saudi deal, that was good for britain, it gave our economy £45billion in revenue, i would pay a billion in bribes for that. Good bit of business on the part of the then trade minister. Now it would be the other way round because now the ministers are only looking to line there own pockets. Today it is blair, prescot, brown, mandelsohn, byers, harman, jowell, blunkett, etc taking the bungs and selling british interests to foreign companies.


If money is pouring in to make produce and sell weapons this does of course beneift shareholders in the short term. The concept of 'our' economy is as relevant as me knowing the Queen. She is 'my' Queen but I get none of the benefits. but I have to fork out subsidies to keep them in the life they are accustomed to-permanent parasitism.

Bomb making inevitably means they have to be used for wars and chaos which leads to losses for 'our' economy.
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The war industry primarily exists because we have been conditioned to see our interests in terms of national interest and not what's in the interest of people, society and the world regardless of national borders.

In case it has escaped people's attention, the war industry (aka the defense industry in doublespeak) is all about killing people, usually innocent civilians and it costs us all: both financially and spiritually.

If 911 and iraq teach us anything it is war is one gigantic confidence trick run by a global mafia. The fact that bae/HMG 'won' this business on the back of bribes is just further proof, but ultimately war is by its very nature a corrupt and criminal enterprise regardless of whether bribes help to secure the deal
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 2:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ian neal wrote:
The war industry primarily exists because we have been conditioned to see our interests in terms of national interest and not what's in the interest of people, society and the world regardless of national borders.

In case it has escaped people's attention, the war industry (aka the defense industry in doublespeak) is all about killing people, usually innocent civilians and it costs us all: both financially and spiritually.

If 911 and iraq teach us anything it is war is one gigantic confidence trick run by a global mafia. The fact that bae/HMG 'won' this business on the back of bribes is just further proof, but ultimately war is by its very nature a corrupt and criminal enterprise regardless of whether bribes help to secure the deal


Well said, Ian.

The highlighted bit is one of the key deceptions of the modern age. So many people buy the myth that the Government has our interests at heart when taking decisions, for example, that "our" armies are fighting on our behalf. The truth is that the state is used as a tool by the elite 1% to do their bidding, to manipulate scenarios to benefit the super-rich, the Multi-National Corporations and the Miltary-Industrial Complex. The interests of the vast bulk of the population do not come into the equation for one second.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 4:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How Saudi slush kept UK aero biz afloat
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/06/08/bae_uk_saudi/
By Lewis Page
Published Friday 8th June 2007 12:33 GMT

Analysis The long-smouldering debate around allegations of corrupt British arms deals with Saudi Arabia reignited yesterday, as both the Guardian and the Beeb published the results of new investigations.

To recap: back in 1986, the Saudis agreed with the British government to buy a large amount of military hardware from UK firms under a long-term deal called al-Yamamah ("the dove").

The majority of the kit consisted of Tornado combat jets from the company then known as British Aerospace plc: both low-level strike versions intended to deliver the JP233 runway-denial landmine system, and the F3 fighter variant.

The JP233 and low-level runway attack doctrine are now widely viewed as suicidal, after RAF Tornados were decimated while using such tactics against Saddam Hussein's airbases in 1991. The RAF has since binned JP233 and re-equipped its Tornado bombers for higher-altitude work.

The Tornado F3 fighter was a laughing-stock from the moment it entered RAF service. Nonetheless, the RAF was forced to buy far more F3s than it wanted. As of 2004 the RAF had fewer than 90 F3s flying: 170 were bought during the 1980s and 1990s. The defective jets only reached a reasonable level of serviceability in the early to mid-90s according to some analyses (pdf) (http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/ebooks/Foxhunter.pdf), when their ever-troublesome Foxhunter targeting radars finally acquired Non-cooperative Target Recognition (NCTR) capability - lack of which, among other things, had kept British F3s out of the air fighting in 1991. The Tornado F3 started retiring from RAF service in 2005, scarcely 10 years after it had been brought to a somewhat combat-worthy state.

(The original F2 airframes first delivered to the RAF were even worse, in that they had no radar at all; just cement ballast in their empty nose cones. This was wryly dubbed "Blue Circle radar," in an allusion to the Sea Harrier's Blue Fox and Blue Vixen sets - and the well-known cement company.)

Despite the poor performance and reputation of the Tornados, the Saudis have continued to pay huge sums under al-Yamamah right up until the present day - more than £40bn to British Aerospace. The firm is nowadays known as BAE Systems, as it is no longer very British (only a third of its employees are today in the UK) nor does it only deal in sky weaponry, having moved into warships, submarines, armour, artillery etc etc.

Allegations of corruption surrounding the al-Yamamah deal surfaced almost immediately, and in 1989 the UK National Audit Office investigated. Uniquely, the report of the investigation remains secret to this day; a fact which may not be unconnected to the second stage of al-Yamamah having been signed the year before. By this point the British civil aircraft industry (which still existed at that date, and was owned by BAE) was only being kept in existence by al-Yamamah.*

Despite the suppression of the NAO report, the stink around the British arms industry and the Saudis never really went away. The Minister for Defence Procurement and later chief secretary to the Treasury, Jonathan Aitken, unwisely resigned from government in 1995 to bring a libel action against the Guardian and Granada TV for exposing his involvement in the UK-Saudi arms trade. He was cuffed and jailed in 1999 for repeatedly lying on oath during the failed libel case.

In 2001, the Guardian began taking the fight to BAE and the UK government, wheeling out whistleblowers and detailed investigations. Roman-Empire levels of excess were revealed, with BAE having picked up the tab for cargo planes full of Bond Street shopping, companionship from lingerie models and actresses (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article1599694.ece), and lord knows what else. In 2002, the UK passed laws against corrupt payments to overseas officials.

Finally, in 2004, the UK Serious Fraud Office launched a new investigation. The Ministry of Defence (MoD), however, had full access to the investigation via the participation of the MoD police force.

By the summer of 2006, it was thought that the SFO/MoD-plod/Guardian probe might be getting somewhere, with Swiss authorities reportedly on the verge of yielding access to key bank information.

Meanwhile, the UK government had got itself into another nightmare fighter-jet deal, mirroring the situation with the Tornado F3. The long-awaited Eurofighter is finally being delivered, and the UK is committed to buying no less than 232 of these colossally expensive machines. The RAF wants no more than 140.

Then the Saudis stepped in again, ordering 72 Eurofighters. It has been strongly hinted by BAE that the UK government might be able to resell some of its excess jets to fulfil this order, thus avoiding another embarrassing acquisition of eight-figure white elephants. And, of course, the £6bn of Saudi money might do the British balance of payments a bit of good (not all that much, though; UK exports for 2006 alone are estimated at £235bn. £6bn spread over years barely signifies).

Strangely enough, at this point the SFO investigation was binned. It was strongly hinted that this was at the behest of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS, aka MI6), who were said to be heavily reliant on intel furnished by the Saudis.

It's true that's a large element of what the spooks do - act as a channel for under-the-counter info from other governments. It's also true that BAE has a close relationship with the secret service (exiled SIS officer Richard Tomlinson says the company has an in-house MI6 liaison who sees secret intel reports). Even so, it's said (http://www.guardian.co.uk/armstrade/story/0,,1991281,00.html) that SIS doesn't fancy taking the rap for another suspect government decision so soon after the dodgy dossier/Iraq WMD business.

It seems hugely more plausible that the SFO investigation was deep-sixed to protect the weapons deal du jour, just like the NAO report of 1992 - for all that everyone involved denies this.

The denials haven't convinced many. The OECD international watchdog, for instance, has rebuked Britain over the move and launched its own probe. The US has also expressed its displeasure, which might cause trouble for BAE's ongoing push (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/05/14/bae_media_push_going_well/) to buy US weaponsmaker Armor.

Meanwhile, those relatively unbothered about possible corruption overseas but concerned about the defence of the UK have also criticised the Saudi Eurofighter buy. Some might say that selling rubbish such as the Tornado F3 to the Saudis for a lot of money is one thing; but selling them the Eurofighter is quite another. Reports thus far suggest that the Eurofighter, for all its horrifying expense and delays, is actually a fairly cutting-edge piece of kit. Furthermore, the export deal is to be "Saudi-ised," potentially meaning that the desert princes will actually gain access to the technology rather than merely the use of the hardware.

It's possible to suggest that it isn't actually in the interests of western democracy to release such tech out into the wider world. The Saudis probably can't use it, but they wouldn't have any real reason to keep it to themselves.

All of which brings us up to yesterday, with the Guardian revealing (http://www.guardian.co.uk/baefiles/story/0,,2097149,00.html?gusrc=rss &feed=networkfront) that Prince Bandar of the house al-Saud was paid more than £1bn over 10 years by BAE, which drew the cash from "a special Ministry of Defence account". The paper reported:
"According to legal sources familiar with the records, BAE Systems made cash transfers to Prince Bandar every three months for 10 years or more.

"The payments are alleged to have continued for at least 10 years and beyond 2002, when Britain outlawed corrupt payments to overseas officials.

"SFO investigators led by assistant director Helen Garlick first stumbled on the alleged payments, according to legal sources, when they unearthed highly classified documents at the MoD during their three-year investigation."

There isn't much doubt that the legal sources in question have had access to the SFO's now-closed files. When contacted by the Reg, an SFO spokesman said he couldn't comment on how the documents had reached the public domain.

"If I have a conversation with you, that's private to you and me," he said. "I wouldn't then give another journalist the details."

The SFO also pointed out that the Guardian in particular had been intimately involved in the investigation from the beginning. Indeed, the paper had supplied the information which led the SFO to move in the first place.

It's understood that the head of the SFO, in an interview to be broadcast on Panorama next Monday, has expressed the view that the details of the payments are not sufficient to win convictions even though some transactions date since the anti-corruption legislation of 2002.

This is thought to be because the payments were fully authorised by the British government and laid down in the al-Yamamah agreements; also because of the difficulty of distinguishing between corrupt payments to overseas individuals and legitimate ones into foreign government accounts.

The BBC quotes (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/6728773.stm) David Caruso, an investigator who worked for the American bank where the accounts were held:

"There wasn't a distinction between the accounts of the embassy, or official government accounts as we would call them, and the accounts of the royal family." Unsurprisingly, as the al-Saud family really are the government: it's Saudi Arabia, after all. The situation is as if Britain were called "Windsor Europe," and the Queen's family - rather than being junior army officers, theatrical types, polo players etc - held all important government jobs.

Prince Bandar's lawyers told the Guardian that the payments via the Washington embassy accounts in no way "represented improper secret commissions or 'backhanders'".

The Prince's position is that the cash went to Saudi government accounts of which he was a signatory. "Any monies paid out of those accounts were exclusively for purposes approved by [the Saudi defence ministry]."

Prince Bandar's reps insisted that all the payments were "pursuant to the al-Yamamah contracts."

When contacted by the Reg defence desk, BAE Systems' rep rather worryingly said: "We know who you are." But this turned out to be because of this book (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lions-Donkeys-Dinosaurs-Blundering-Military/d p/0099484420) rather than any corporate spies (http://news.independent.co.uk/business/news/article2461489.ece) at the Reg.

The company then offered the following comment: "All the information regarding the Al Yamamah contract in our possession has been made available to the Serious Fraud Office over the last two and a half years and, after an exhaustive investigation, it was concluded, over and above the interests of national security, that there was and is no case to answer.

"A spokesman for the Attorney General has confirmed that nothing in this week’s media reports alters this position.

"The Al Yamamah programme is a government-to-government agreement and all such payments made under those agreements were made with the express approval of both the Saudi and the UK governments.

"We deny all allegations of wrongdoing in relation to this important and strategic programme."

In other words, sure, Saudi princes were paid off; the UK government promised they would be in the original al-Yamamah treaty. Don't blame us: nothing to see here.

BAE reps also expressed the view that the ongoing media revelations would have no effect on US legislators' decision as to whether the company would be allowed to acquire Armor Group. That at least remains to be seen.

So does the effect on the reputation of the UK government, not least with respect to the ongoing OECD probe. The more so as it now appears that UK officials have been economical with the truth (http://www.guardian.co.uk/baefiles/story/0,,2098232,00.html?gusrc=rss &feed=networkfront) in discussions with OECD investigators.

Bootnote

*From 1988-90 your correspondent was an undergraduate management trainee at BAE's Hatfield civil-aircraft factory, now the site of the Ocado web-groceries warehouse; and from 1988-91 an RAF university-reservist cadet pilot.

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay Rusbridger (he's the Guardian's editor), then stop being sumissive yersself and let's have the 9/11 exposee! - ed.

Latest allegations ignored by a submissive media

Ian Black, Middle East editor
Friday June 8, 2007

The latest instalment of the BAE arms saga was followed up by British television, radio, newspapers and on the international wires yesterday, but the Saudi press was certain to ignore the episode completely. In the wider Arab media, only the Qatar-based al-Jazeera TV channel - extensively watched inside the kingdom - gave it air time. Its only serious rival, al-Arabiyya, which is majority-owned by a Saudi shareholder, ignored it. The only Arabic newspaper planning to cover the story in today's editions was the London-based al-Quds al-Arabi.

"We didn't even bother to try to get any reaction," its editor, Abdel-Bari Atwan, told the Guardian. "It is an absolute taboo. No-one can open their mouth about it because the Saudis control so much of the Arab media." Al-Hayat, another leading pan-Arab paper published abroad, is owned by Prince Khaled, Prince Bandar's brother. "If it is mentioned at all in a Saudi paper it will talk about a conspiracy, probably attributed to Zionists, to weaken the kingdom," said Dr Madawi al-Rasheed, a political scientist at London University's King's College.

Several Arabic-language websites reproduced the story as reported by the BBC Arabic Service. But any political discussion - "plundering our billions for their private greed" is the sort of language used - was likely to be limited to members-only internet talkboards out of the reach of Saudi censorship.

The sense that Prince Bandar is unassailable is reinforced by his role in some of the kingdom's most delicate diplomatic business, negotiating with Iran and reportedly meeting secretly in Jordan with the Israeli prime minister, Ehud Olmert.

Saudi internal opposition has been muted since a flurry of activity by constitutional and political reformers in 2004. Twenty-two people whom the king pardoned in August 2005 after they had received lengthy prison sentences for their writings, are subject to travel bans.

The only other opposition in Osama bin Laden's native land is from al-Qaida and other jihadists, who have long written off the royal family as corrupt and apostate lackeys of the west. Last November, King Abdullah issued a circular prohibiting government employees from "opposing the policies of the state ... by participating in any discussion through media channels or through domestic or foreign communications". Beleaguered reformers are disappointed that the US has ended efforts to promote democracy in the aftermath of the war in Iraq, now that stability rather than change is the watchword of Washington's Middle East policy.

Several Saudis speculated that the emergence of new information about al-Yamamah may be part of a western effort to undermine Crown Prince Sultan, Prince Bandar's father, so that the next king is instead the modernising Prince Salman, now the governor of the capital, Riyadh.

King Abdullah, 82, had a reputation for fighting corruption when he came to power in 2005, but he is said to have made little progress. Neither he nor his brother speak or read English, and take their holidays in Morocco and Tunisia or elsewhere in the Arab world.

"Ordinary Saudis are far too preoccupied with making ends meet to be aware of this sort of thing," said a veteran foreign resident of Riyadh. "Yes they are aware of corruption at the local level ... but that is far beyond their experience. Technocrats who speak English or have lived in the west are better informed, but they say that these sort of things have been going on all over the Middle East for the past 30 years."

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay Rushbridger (he's the Guardian's editor), then stop being sumissive yersself and let's have the 9/11 exposee! - ed.

Latest allegations ignored by a submissive media
http://www.guardian.co.uk/baefiles/story/0,,2098265,00.html
Ian Black, Middle East editor
Friday June 8, 2007

The latest instalment of the BAE arms saga was followed up by British television, radio, newspapers and on the international wires yesterday, but the Saudi press was certain to ignore the episode completely. In the wider Arab media, only the Qatar-based al-Jazeera TV channel - extensively watched inside the kingdom - gave it air time. Its only serious rival, al-Arabiyya, which is majority-owned by a Saudi shareholder, ignored it. The only Arabic newspaper planning to cover the story in today's editions was the London-based al-Quds al-Arabi.

"We didn't even bother to try to get any reaction," its editor, Abdel-Bari Atwan, told the Guardian. "It is an absolute taboo. No-one can open their mouth about it because the Saudis control so much of the Arab media." Al-Hayat, another leading pan-Arab paper published abroad, is owned by Prince Khaled, Prince Bandar's brother. "If it is mentioned at all in a Saudi paper it will talk about a conspiracy, probably attributed to Zionists, to weaken the kingdom," said Dr Madawi al-Rasheed, a political scientist at London University's King's College.

Several Arabic-language websites reproduced the story as reported by the BBC Arabic Service. But any political discussion - "plundering our billions for their private greed" is the sort of language used - was likely to be limited to members-only internet talkboards out of the reach of Saudi censorship.

The sense that Prince Bandar is unassailable is reinforced by his role in some of the kingdom's most delicate diplomatic business, negotiating with Iran and reportedly meeting secretly in Jordan with the Israeli prime minister, Ehud Olmert.

Saudi internal opposition has been muted since a flurry of activity by constitutional and political reformers in 2004. Twenty-two people whom the king pardoned in August 2005 after they had received lengthy prison sentences for their writings, are subject to travel bans.

The only other opposition in Osama bin Laden's native land is from al-Qaida and other jihadists, who have long written off the royal family as corrupt and apostate lackeys of the west. Last November, King Abdullah issued a circular prohibiting government employees from "opposing the policies of the state ... by participating in any discussion through media channels or through domestic or foreign communications". Beleaguered reformers are disappointed that the US has ended efforts to promote democracy in the aftermath of the war in Iraq, now that stability rather than change is the watchword of Washington's Middle East policy.

Several Saudis speculated that the emergence of new information about al-Yamamah may be part of a western effort to undermine Crown Prince Sultan, Prince Bandar's father, so that the next king is instead the modernising Prince Salman, now the governor of the capital, Riyadh.

King Abdullah, 82, had a reputation for fighting corruption when he came to power in 2005, but he is said to have made little progress. Neither he nor his brother speak or read English, and take their holidays in Morocco and Tunisia or elsewhere in the Arab world.

"Ordinary Saudis are far too preoccupied with making ends meet to be aware of this sort of thing," said a veteran foreign resident of Riyadh. "Yes they are aware of corruption at the local level ... but that is far beyond their experience. Technocrats who speak English or have lived in the west are better informed, but they say that these sort of things have been going on all over the Middle East for the past 30 years."

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www.rl911truth.org
www.stj911.org
www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
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www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ian neal wrote:
The war industry primarily exists because we have been conditioned to see our interests in terms of national interest and not what's in the interest of people, society and the world regardless of national borders.

In case it has escaped people's attention, the war industry (aka the defense industry in doublespeak) is all about killing people, usually innocent civilians and it costs us all: both financially and spiritually.

If 911 and iraq teach us anything it is war is one gigantic confidence trick run by a global mafia. The fact that bae/HMG 'won' this business on the back of bribes is just further proof, but ultimately war is by its very nature a corrupt and criminal enterprise regardless of whether bribes help to secure the deal


Its a win,win,win situation for them. they create wars for mythical reasons, thereby winning some geo political advantage, they win by using up the munitions for mass murder, using the tax to buy up ever more, and the icing on the cake, reconstruction, bomb it, then rebuild it.

Its no wonder this scam never gets to go mainstream, too busy talking about pennies saved on the NHS, immigrants taking a couple more pennies in benefits, while billions and billions of funding for the scam goes under the radar.

Close the post offices, to save a couple of million, merge the hospitals to save a couple more etc etc, now raise them taxes because theres more wars to start, and more rebuilding to do. Ministry of defense my arse, ministry of attack etc.
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2007 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

conspirator wrote:

If money is pouring in to make produce and sell weapons this does of course beneift shareholders in the short term. The concept of 'our' economy is as relevant as me knowing the Queen. She is 'my' Queen but I get none of the benefits. but I have to fork out subsidies to keep them in the life they are accustomed to-permanent parasitism.

Bomb making inevitably means they have to be used for wars and chaos which leads to losses for 'our' economy.


Quote:
ian neal wrote:
The war industry primarily exists because we have been conditioned to see our interests in terms of national interest and not what's in the interest of people, society and the world regardless of national borders.

In case it has escaped people's attention, the war industry (aka the defense industry in doublespeak) is all about killing people, usually innocent civilians and it costs us all: both financially and spiritually.

If 911 and iraq teach us anything it is war is one gigantic confidence trick run by a global mafia. The fact that bae/HMG 'won' this business on the back of bribes is just further proof, but ultimately war is by its very nature a corrupt and criminal enterprise regardless of whether bribes help to secure the deal


I hear what you guys are saying but it really was a good bit of business. The Saudi's have not used the £45 billion weapons to attack anyone. They are probably too stupid to even know how to use them. I can even say that all the beheadings and torture and assasinations that happen on a daily basis in saudi arabia would still happen with or without these fighter jets and other arms.
It is a different thing to give billions of pounds worth of weapons to Israel who you know will murder people with them straight away.
And it is different to sell these weapons to a bankrupt african country to start wars against it's neighbours.
But selling to Saudi and sultan of brunei and other such places is a fairly safe bet that they will never use the weapons. The same way that the arabs buy fleets of rolls royces and solid gold toilets and build tall skyscrapers in the desert whilst most of the population is still barefoot and illiterate.
Who knows one day saudi arabia might pluck up the balls to use them against Israel.

Is is wrong to make and sell land mines and depleted uranium bombs to warmongering nations like Israel. But i dont see the harm in flogging some overpriced jets to a bunch of thick princes who just want something that looks good. I bet the pilots are non saudis and when the time comes to use the weapons BAe will pull the launch codes and the planes will be obselete.

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2007 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

stelios wrote:


Is is wrong to make and sell land mines and depleted uranium bombs to warmongering nations like Israel. But i dont see the harm in flogging some overpriced jets to a bunch of thick princes who just want something that looks good. I bet the pilots are non saudis and when the time comes to use the weapons BAe will pull the launch codes and the planes will be obselete.


During the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq the Kuwaiti airforce with the latest fighter jets was used just to ferry people out to safety. Whilst Saudi Arabia doesn't have a capable military or anyone willing to fight it does play a role in the Arab world through its slush funds. It props up all pro-american Palestinian groupings in Palestine, it supported the US invasion of Iraq, it acts geopolitically as an arm of US imperialism in the Middle East. Its corruption is an extension of being allied with 'us'...
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2007 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Forget the saudi deal, that was good for britain, it gave our economy £45billion in revenue, i would pay a billion in bribes for that. Good bit of business on the part of the then trade minister. Now it would be the other way round because now the ministers are only looking to line there own pockets. Today it is blair, prescot, brown, mandelsohn, byers, harman, jowell, blunkett, etc taking the bungs and selling british interests to foreign companies.

When it was the Tories it was good but now it is different Tories it is bad. You are all over this forum having a laugh aren't you Stelios? Wouldn't paying bribes be immmoral Stelios, and contrary to your religious sentiments? For the record I am utterly against the paying of any bribes or exporting arms to anyone.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2007 1:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forget the saudi deal, that was good for britain, it gave our economy £45billion in revenue, i would pay a billion in bribes for that. Good bit of business on the part of the then trade minister. Now it would be the other way round because now the ministers are only looking to line there own pockets. Today it is blair, prescot, brown, mandelsohn, byers, harman, jowell, blunkett, etc taking the bungs and selling british interests to foreign companies.[/quote]
9/11 Truth Campaigners should inhabit the Moral High Ground. When I was campaigning for East Timor, and against export of Hawk aircraft and other arms sales, one of my placard points was: 'Are British jobs worth more than Timorese lives?' 'Blood Money' is good for no one, except Satan's followers.
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:30 pm    Post subject: Bent Bandar funds 911, accidentally Reply with quote

No doubt, Bandar actually pocketed some of that £1bn for his own use. I doubt whether he pocketed it all and much of the payments were not intended as a bribe to secure business but for use in other criminal purposes. For those who knew about the £1bn, it could be understood as a personal bribe.

Other anomilies in the Blair position are:

a) We had to stop the investigation because Saudis would otherwise not play ball with us over the War on Terrorism?
Yet, Blair tells us that Al Qaeda is a threat to the Saudi Arabian government, so why would they cut their nose off to spite their face?

b) It saves jobs.
Yet, they're not interested in spending money to save other jobs that are at risk.

c) Why would Saudi Arabia spend £43bn on a useless defence systems?
As pointed out elsewhere, when the US lied to them about Iraq wanting to invade them before the first Gulf War, they didn't use their own expensive defence, they ran to the Pentagon for protection. (And Pentagon troops in Saudia Arabia, we are supposed to believe, made Bin Laden so mad he wanted to destroy Western civilization.)

Real reasons? Saudis wanted the Anglo-American Establishment to contribute to their own Al Qaeda false flag. Blair is worried that investigators in OECD not from UK or US may stumble on some very embarassing details of what Bandar did with his bribe money.

What did The Guardian, 9 June 2007, p4, say about how Bandar spent money?

“Prince Bandar has spoken himself of his unorthodox methods with cash. He is quoted in a recent biography saying that he personally flew $100m in a suitcase to Rome and gave it to a priest at the Vatican Bank, in order to covertly fund the Christian Democrats against the Communists in the 1983 Italian elections.

He is quoted saying he did this at the request of the Pope, Lady Thatcher and then head of the CIA, Bill Casey. They wanted him to shift the cash so no western fingerprints would be on it.

American investigations into Prince Bandar’s bank accounts began in 2002 because of an apparent receipt of charitable funds by one of the 911 hijackers. The FBI were called in. The link to a donation made by Prince Bandar’s wife proved to be entirely innocent and he and his family were completely exonerated.” Oh, yes. And what's 'an apparant receipt'?


There ought to be an international investigation into those countries that are Western allies but have the most advanced Al Qaeda networks, i.e. Saudi Arabia, Pakistan. It should be dressed up as looking into the best way that those countries, with international support, can combat violent or other Islamic extremism. Such an investigation could shine a light on those countries support for terrorism. Such an investigation would be supported by US senators and congressmen not in on the false flag loop. Of course, the US government should not be the lead in such an investigation.
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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2007 5:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

blackcat wrote:
When it was the Tories it was good but now it is different Tories it is bad. You are all over this forum having a laugh aren't you Stelios? Wouldn't paying bribes be immmoral Stelios, and contrary to your religious sentiments? For the record I am utterly against the paying of any bribes or exporting arms to anyone.


The only person who is having a laugh is you, over a thousand posts and you have yet to post a single worthwhile reply. in fact there is no point even involving you in any discussion because you seem to be on a different planet from everyone else.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2007 5:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

conspirator wrote:

During the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq the Kuwaiti airforce with the latest fighter jets was used just to ferry people out to safety. Whilst Saudi Arabia doesn't have a capable military or anyone willing to fight it does play a role in the Arab world through its slush funds. It props up all pro-american Palestinian groupings in Palestine, it supported the US invasion of Iraq, it acts geopolitically as an arm of US imperialism in the Middle East. Its corruption is an extension of being allied with 'us'...


Saudi Arabia exists to funnel back all the money into the western economies. The Saudi princes are basically a puppet regime installed by the british to work as gatekeepers.
Once we admit and recognise this reality then we can see other realities.
Such as saudi money paid to the pro Israel Fatah party and it's leader Yasser Arafat enabled the palestinian millions to remain in tented citites and refugee camps while Arafat pocketed hundreds of millions of saudi 'aid' money. Arafat was Israel's number one employee and gatekeeper and did more to hold back the palestinian cause than even the British Labour party.
Saudi Arabia supported all US actions and invasions anywhere in the world, because the saudi princes are effectively american employees paid to look after the oil wealth and funnel it back to the western economies.

I sincerely hope one day that the public executions and the most brutal regime in the world - Saudi Arabia will be toppled and replaced by a genuine democracy. The best example of a democracy is India. The only democracy in the whole of the middle east is in fact Iran. Saudi Arabia is a very crooked and brutal dictatorship run for the sole purpose of spending it's money in the usa and europe.
Tell me when you ever heard of a saudi prince opening a factory in Bangladesh?

Never call Saudi princes muslims because they are as close to being muslims as George Bush himself. The saudi princes have a symbiotic relationship with the Bush family both watching each other's backs.

Back to the subject, if BAe had not won the contract then the £45 billion would have simply gone to Lockheed Martin. whatever the rights and wrongs it really was a good bit of business. The saudi money burns a hole in their barefoot pockets and needs to find a home. That is why they waste it over here. If britain did not want to accept it france, germany USA would happily take up the slack.

Instead of past sins of BAe why not look at current sins of the current governement and the wholesale privatisation of most of the UK economy and state sector to american and swiss and european as well as Israeli companies. What about the huge kickbacks that labour ministers have recieved? Lets investigate that while they are still in power.

Bandar is an evil man and sponsors terrorism only on the orders of and with the approval of his Bush family symbiots.

Better for us to oppose the saudi regime and expose the thousands of beheadings and tortured prisoners. Forget the BAe deal.
Cure the disease not the used tissue paper

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2007 5:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Instead of past sins of BAe why not look at current sins of the current governement and the wholesale privatisation of most of the UK economy and state sector to american and swiss and european as well as Israeli companies. What about the huge kickbacks that labour ministers have recieved? Lets investigate that while they are still in power.

Well I am happy to conced that I live on a different planet from you anyway, along with all the other Earthlings here. You bang on about the privatization of the UK economy by THIS government as it continues with the dregs left by the Thatcher/Major governments. You are most definitely having a laugh - nobody is that dumb!
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:24 am    Post subject: Re: Bent Bandar funds 911, accidentally Reply with quote

insidejob wrote:
Prince Bandar has spoken himself of his unorthodox methods with cash. He is quoted in a recent biography saying that he personally flew $100m in a suitcase to Rome and gave it to a priest at the Vatican Bank, in order to covertly fund the Christian Democrats against the Communists in the 1983 Italian elections.


His cash or his American symbiots?

Quote:

There ought to be an international investigation into those countries that are Western allies but have the most advanced Al Qaeda networks, i.e. Saudi Arabia, Pakistan. It should be dressed up as looking into the best way that those countries, with international support, can combat violent or other Islamic extremism. Such an investigation could shine a light on those countries support for terrorism.


Have we missed something? America and Britain are the number one and number two worldwide sponsors of terrorism.
So who would carry out this investigation?
Al-Qaeda was created by the CIA and is financed heavily. Rember Saudi Arabia is a dictatorship where we put them in power to look after OUR interests. If they sponsor terror it is because we tell them to. If they prop up the dollar or bail out fox news or bail out euro disney it is because we tell them to.

Bandar as seen on bbc tv this week is simply a cog in the bush family wheel. Him and his fellow saudis have been the most brutal and evil dictatorship on earth. But nobody opposes them because they are our (britain and america's) employees. Bandar the Bandit said in his CNN interview. "Everyone is crooked look at adam and eve, they were in heaven then there was all that hanky panky"
And people describe him as a 'muslim'
he is as muslim as George Bush

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

outsider wrote:

9/11 Truth Campaigners should inhabit the Moral High Ground. When I was campaigning for East Timor, and against export of Hawk aircraft and other arms sales, one of my placard points was: 'Are British jobs worth more than Timorese lives?' 'Blood Money' is good for no one, except Satan's followers.


When you were campaigning for East Timor i hope you were also campaigning for palestine and chechnya and Tibet.
Because many people consider money spent in Marks & Spencers to be blood money too.

There are examples of Blood Money.
Land mines.
Depleted Uranium
For some reason people only seem concerned with oil/gas producing places. I would like to ask you why you chose the small population of East Timor as your chosen campaign?

Quote:

One promising long-term project is the joint development with Australia of petroleum and natural gas resources in the waters southeast of Timor.The agreement gave 82% of revenues to Australia and only 18% to East Timor
The Portuguese colonial administration granted a concession to Oceanic Exploration Corporation, of Denver, Colorado, to develop the petroleum deposits of the Timor Sea. Before the concession could begin to be developed, the Indonesian invasion made it impossible.
Timor Sea petroleum resources were divided between Indonesia and Australia by the Timor Gap Treaty in 1989 which established guidelines for joint exploitation of seabed resources in the area of the "gap" left by then-Portuguese Timor in the maritime boundary agreed between the two countries in 1972. Revenues from the "joint" area were to be divided 50%-50%. Woodside Petroleum and ConocoPhillips began development of some resources in the Timor Gap on behalf of the two governments in 1992.


Portugal, America, Indonesia and Australia want the oil.
That is why you saw it on the news and that is why the campaign was well funded probably by a rival oil company like SINOOC and got alot of media coverage. If that province had no oil or gas you would have never heard about it

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7086997.stm

Quote:
Pressure groups win BAE challenge

Two pressure groups have won a High Court challenge on the legality of the decision to end investigations into BAE Systems' dealings with Saudi Arabia.

Corner House Research and the Campaign Against the Arms Trade had asked for permission to seek a judicial review.

They want to contest the Serious Fraud Office's decision last year to stop investigations into whether BAE gave money to Saudi officials in the 1980s.

BAE, the UK's largest defence group, has always said it acted lawfully.

Lord Justice Moses, sitting with Mr Justice Irwin, said "matters of concern and public importance" had been raised and the challenge "cries out for a hearing".

'Slush fund'

The allegation investigated by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) centred on BAE's £43bn Al-Yamamah arms deal to Saudi Arabia in 1985, which provided Tornado and Hawk jets plus other military equipment.

BAE was accused of operating a slush fund to help it secure the contract.

The SFO inquiry into the Al Yamamah deal was stopped in December 2006 by the government, with attorney general Lord Goldsmith announcing that it was threatening the UK's national security.

BAE has since secured a giant new order from Saudi Arabia.

Announced in September, Saudi Arabia is buying 72 Eurofighter Typhoon jets for about £4.4bn.

Corner House, a group that campaigns for enforcement of the law in overseas corruption offences, said even if national security was at risk, there was still not legal justification for ending the investigation.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2007 12:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The actual facts, history and legal position driving the judicial review.

All of which proves yet again that all of the laws and conventions in the world mean not a jot unless the decisions taken by our "democratic" governments, which contravene those conventions, can be challenged in spite of earlier High Court obstinance.

http://www.thecornerhouse.org.uk/item.shtml?x=558380

Quote:
Oral hearing

BAE-Saudi arms deals investigation legal challenge

by The Corner House and CAAT

first published 8th November 2007 | summary

Oral hearing

Royal Courts of Justice, The Strand, London

Friday 9 November 2007, 10.30am

At an oral hearing in the UK High Court on Friday 9 November, lawyers for Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) and The Corner House will argue that permission should be granted for a full judicial review hearing against the UK Government's decision to cut short an investigation by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO) into alleged corruption by BAE Systems in recent arms deals with Saudi Arabia.

The two groups contend that the decision is unlawful under the OECD's Anti-Bribery Convention, which the UK signed in 1997. The Government has denied any breach of the Convention - but has declared that it would have taken the decision to terminate the investigation, regardless of international law, on the grounds of "national security".

The campaigners' lawyers will argue that the SFO decision failed to take into account the national security implications of not proceeding with the investigation. They will contend that the UK Government's willingness to turn a blind eye to corruption within Saudi Arabia has the potential to encourage more international resentment towards the UK.

The legal challenge process began last year, when the UK Government's Serious Fraud Office (SFO) suspended its investigation on 14th December 2006 into BAE's arms deals with Saudi Arabia. The Serious Fraud Office is a government department that investigates and prosecutes complex fraud.

On 18th December 2006, The Corner House and CAAT wrote to the UK Government arguing that the SFO decision was unlawful and should be reversed.

It was not until 23rd February 2007 that the groups were able to begin the formal judicial review process, and on 18th April 2007 filed papers at the High Court in a judicial review against the UK Government's decision to terminate the SFO investigation.

A month later, on 29th May 2007, the High Court refused to grant permission for a judicial review hearing on the grounds that "national security must always prevail". The oral hearing this Friday is in response to that decision.

The basis for our legal challenge hinges on Article 5 of the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention. The SFO decision was purportedly based on considerations of potential damage to relations with Saudi Arabia, and thus to the UK's national security, if the BAE-Saudi arms deals investigation continued. This is expressly forbidden under Article 5, which rules out the termination of corruption investigations on grounds other than the merits of the case. Signatory governments specifically undertake not to be influenced "by the potential effect [of an investigation] upon relations with another State . . . .".

The groups' lawyers will further argue at the oral hearing that the then Prime Minister, Tony Blair, in his advice to the Attorney General and the SFO, improperly took into account considerations of damage to diplomatic relations. His advice amounted to a direction to discontinue the investigation, which is an unlawful interference with the independence of prosecutors under domestic and international law.

Since the Serious Fraud Office terminated its investigation in December last year, the Department of Justice in the United States has launched a criminal inquiry into alleged corruption in BAE Systems' deals with Saudi Arabia and the company's compliance with US anti-corruption laws. The Department made an official request for 'mutual legal assistance' to the Home Office, which has delayed passing the request to the Serious Fraud Office. The SFO has important documentation relevant to an investigation gained from its inquiry into payments made to members of the Saudi royal family.

In addition, a US pension fund and BAE shareholder started to sue past and present directors of BAE Systems in September this year over allegations that the company spent more than $2 billion bribing Saudi Arabian officials to win business. The fund charges the company officers with breaching their fiduciary duties.

For more background information, go to Subjects/ Corruption on this website.

For the latest news on the court case, go to the Control BAE website.

And look at the BAE files documented by The Guardian newspaper.

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PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 12:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

FBI serves subpoenas on BAE chief and US colleagues
Attempts by BAE to escape allegations of corruption in Saudi arms deals seemed to have failed last night as the arms company admitted that FBI agents had picked up its chief executive, Mike Turner, and served subpoenas on him and US colleagues.
The details of the justice department raids were passed to the Serious Fraud Office in London as a "courtesy", sources said yesterday, but British authorities had not been notified in advance. The SFO is being prevented from continuing its own corruption inquiry by UK ministers, who have also repeatedly refused to cooperate with US official requests for assistance.
So far, British ministers have sought to preserve relations with the arms company and Saudi Arabia, even at the expense of irritating their most powerful ally........
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/may/19/bae.baesystemsbusiness

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 28, 2010 12:38 am    Post subject: Saudi Prince Bandar Missing? Reply with quote

Saudi prince still missing
Mon Sep 27, 2010 7:12PM
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http://edition.presstv.ir/detail/144257.html

Saudi Arabia's former Ambassador to the US Prince Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdul Aziz
The whereabouts of Saudi Arabia's former US envoy Prince Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdul Aziz remains unknown nearly two years after his mysterious disappearance.


He was last spotted following a meeting with King Abdullah in Jeddah on December 10, 2008.

The prince was appointed secretary general of the National Security Council by Saudi Arabia's sixth monarch King Abdullah in October 2005.

In September 2009, he was reappointed to the post, but he failed to arrive for the official pledge of allegiance to the king. Surprisingly Prince Bandar's absence did not garner much media attention.

Known as "Bandar Bush" because of his close relations with former US president George W. Bush, the 61-year-old was born in the western city of Ta'if, in Mecca Province.

He is the son of Crown Prince Sultan bin Abdul Aziz.

Dr. Sabri Anousheh, an expert on Middle East and Saudi affairs, links the disappearance of Prince Bandar with Saudi arms deals.

The prince's father played a crucial role in Saudi arms acquisition and was previously in charge of overseeing the country's military expenditure and arms deals, Anousheh notes.

He was elected as the Saudi ambassador to Washington in 1983, and held the position for over two decades. Prince Bandar became so intimated with US government officials that he was deemed an insider.

Bob Woodward, the renowned US journalist who played a key role in revealing the Watergate scandal, demonstrates Bandar's influence in his book Plan of Attack.

Woodward says Bush informed his Secretary of State Colin Powell of his plans for launching the 2003 invasion of Iraq only after discussing the scenario with Prince Bandar.

Iraq's Buratha News Agency has recently said it has evidence proving that that the Saudi national security chief was responsible for arming terrorist organizations in the Middle East.

The agency claims Prince Bandar has assumed leadership of al-Qaeda in Iraq, financing and equipping the terrorist group.

In August 2009, Saad al-Faqih, the head of the opposition group Islamic Reform Movement, told Arab-language Al-Alam channel that Prince Bandar was placed under house arrest after his plot to stage a coup against King Abdullah was discovered and foiled.

In September 2009, British daily the Independent reported that the prince, who was staying in Britain at the time, had not appeared in public for several weeks.

The report triggered rumors that Prince Bandar is seeking to ascend to the Saudi throne.

Semi-official reports say the prince is running secret underground operations in France, while other repots say he has been spotted several times across the European country.

Speculation about his whereabouts may differ, but all analysts agree that regardless of his current location, Prince Bandar is enjoying the US government's full support and is running, equipping and financing terror organizations in Iraq, Lebanon and Pakistan.

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade by Andrew Feinstein: review
'The Shadow World' is an incisive exposé of the weapons trade

By Justin Marozzi

8:00AM GMT 01 Nov 2011
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/8848716/The-Shadow-World-Inside-the Global-Arms-Trade-by-Andrew-Feinstein-review.html
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shadow-World-Inside-Global-Trade/dp/0241144418  /
kindle: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shadow-World-Inside-Global-ebook/dp/B005MJF9Q4  /

If there is one book unlikely to appear on the Christmas reading lists of the former defence secretary Liam Fox and his self-professed adviser Adam Werritty, one suspects that this is it. The sorry case of Dr Fox and the mystery chum-cum-lobbyist amplifies what critics of the defence procurement industry – Feinstein prefers the racier “global arms trade” – have long argued. To put it mildly, and in a nutshell, it is not known for its transparency. Nor, for that matter, its ethics and integrity.

“I hope that you might ask whether we, the bankrollers, should not know more, far more, of this shadow world that affects the lives of us all,” Feinstein challenges the reader at the outset. “Whether we shouldn’t demand greater transparency and accountability from politicians, the military, intelligence agencies, investigators and prosecutors, manufacturers and dealers, who people this parallel universe.”

It is a measure of his incisive reporting, admirable research across several continents and sustained sense of outrage that by the end of this gripping volume many readers will agree with his central argument that a stiff dose of sunlight is the best disinfectant for this shadowy world.

There is an impressive historical sweep to the narrative. Feinstein, founder of Corruption Watch and one-time ANC Member of Parliament, gives an absorbing portrait of Basil Zaharoff, the world’s first flamboyantly high-living arms dealer, “godfather of the modern BAE”, a man who once boasted of starting wars in Africa so he could sell weapons to both sides.

Zaharoff was the model for George Bernard Shaw’s Andrew Undershaft, “a profiteer in mutilation and murder” in Major Barbara, and was famed both for the ubiquity and size of the bribes he paid to secure business.

Bribes are a depressingly constant feature of The Shadow World, whether it is the £40 billion Al Yamamah arms deal between BAE and Saudi Arabia, “arguably the most corrupt transaction in trading history”, or the illegal payments made by arms dealers like Ukrainian-Israeli Leonid Minin, who supplied Liberia with weapons worth millions of dollars in return for diamond and timber concessions. The cast of arms dealers like Minin is unsavoury but thoroughly riveting. They range from the superficially glamorous (Adnan Khashoggi) to the downright callous (Yoshio Kodama, “The Monster”, a Japanese war criminal) and the opportunistic (Viktor Bout, the “Merchant of Death”).

The United States and Britain occupy centre stage in this exposé, joined by the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the author’s native South Africa, Sierra Leone, Iraq and Afghanistan. BAE Systems is the arch-villain of the piece, although the American giant Lockheed Martin, together with those US companies like KBR, Halliburton and Blackwater that work closely with the arms industry, run it close.

Feinstein is tough on Washington’s notorious “revolving door” of people and money between the public and private sector. He notes that, within a year of taking office, President George W Bush had given more than 30 arms industry executives and lobbyists senior positions in his administration.

Feinstein has little time for those who argue that the arms business plays a vital economic role. He claims the numbers of those who work in it are routinely exaggerated and that their jobs require significant state subsidies. The issue of corruption, which is never far from the surface and is able to flourish under the cover of national security, further dents the industry’s credentials. He cites one study that estimates that the arms trade accounts for over 40 per cent of corruption in all world trade.

If the US and Britain come in for swingeing attacks, the less developed world, where checks on the arms trade are weaker, does not emerge with great credit either. Feinstein notes that in the early days of South African democracy, the country spent $6 billion on weapons at a time when the president said it was too poor to purchase antiretroviral drugs required to keep almost six million living with HIV and Aids alive. Over 355,000 died, apparently needlessly, over the next five years. One could blame this on poor governance writ large rather than the arms industry per se. India, the developing world’s largest arms purchaser, is currently seeking to buy weapons worth $42 billion.

Occasionally, Feinstein lays it on a little thick, for instance when he refers to Margaret Thatcher’s “fundamentalist free market ideology”, undermining a powerful thesis with a criticism worthy of an angry teenager.

He holds out little hope for the forthcoming international Arms Trade Treaty. For the foreseeable future at least, his desire for a “coherently regulated, legitimately financed, effectively policed and transparent” arms industry seems a distant prospect indeed.

The Shadow World: Inside the Global Arms Trade

Andrew Feinstein

Hamish Hamilton, £25, 541pp

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2012 12:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Saudi Arabia May Be Tied to 9/11, 2 Ex-Senators Say
By ERIC LICHTBLAU - Published: February 29, 2012
WASHINGTON — For more than a decade, questions have lingered about the possible role of the Saudi government in the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, even as the royal kingdom has made itself a crucial counterterrorism partner in the eyes of American diplomats.

Now, in sworn statements that seem likely to reignite the debate, two former senators who were privy to top secret information on the Saudis’ activities say they believe that the Saudi government might have played a direct role in the terrorist attacks.

“I am convinced that there was a direct line between at least some of the terrorists who carried out the September 11th attacks and the government of Saudi Arabia,” former Senator Bob Graham, Democrat of Florida, said in an affidavit filed as part of a lawsuit brought against the Saudi government and dozens of institutions in the country by families of Sept. 11 victims and others. Mr. Graham led a joint 2002 Congressional inquiry into the attacks.

His former Senate colleague, Bob Kerrey of Nebraska, a Democrat who served on the separate 9/11 Commission, said in a sworn affidavit of his own in the case that “significant questions remain unanswered” about the role of Saudi institutions. “Evidence relating to the plausible involvement of possible Saudi government agents in the September 11th attacks has never been fully pursued,” Mr. Kerrey said.

Their affidavits, which were filed on Friday and have not previously been disclosed, are part of a multibillion-dollar lawsuit that has wound its way through federal courts since 2002. An appellate court, reversing an earlier decision, said in November that foreign nations were not immune to lawsuits under certain terrorism claims, clearing the way for parts of the Saudi case to be reheard in United States District Court in Manhattan.

Lawyers for the Saudis, who have already moved to have the affidavits thrown out of court, declined to comment on the assertions by Mr. Graham and Mr. Kerrey. “The case is in active litigation, and I can’t say anything,” said Michael K. Kellogg, a Washington lawyer for the Saudis.

Officials at the Saudi Embassy in Washington, who have emphatically denied any connection to the attacks in the past, did not respond Wednesday to requests for comment.

The Saudis are seeking to have the case dismissed in part because they say American inquiries — including those in which Mr. Graham and Mr. Kerrey took part — have essentially exonerated them. A recent court filing by the Saudis prominently cited the 9/11 Commission’s “exhaustive” final report, which “found no evidence that the Saudi government as an institution or senior Saudi individuals funded” Al Qaeda.

But Mr. Kerrey and Mr. Graham said that the findings should not be seen as an exoneration and that many important questions about the Saudis’ role had never been fully examined, partly because their panels simply did not have the time or resources given their wider scope.

Terry Strada of New Vernon, N.J., whose husband died in the World Trade Center, said it was “so absurd that it’s laughable” for the Saudis to claim that the federal inquiries had exonerated them.

Unanswered questions include the work of a number of Saudi-sponsored charities with financial links to Al Qaeda, as well as the role of a Saudi citizen living in San Diego at the time of the attacks, Omar al-Bayoumi, who had ties to two of the hijackers and to Saudi officials, Mr. Graham said in his affidavit.

Still, Washington has continued to stand behind Saudi Arabia publicly, with the Justice Department joining the kingdom in trying to have the lawsuits thrown out of court on the grounds that the Saudis are protected by international immunity.

State Department officials did not respond to requests for comment on Wednesday on the impact of the court declarations.

The senators’ assertions “might inject some temporary strain or awkwardness at a diplomatic level,” said Kenneth L. Wainstein, a senior national security official in the George W. Bush administration. Even so, he said, “the United States and the Saudis have developed strong counterterrorism cooperation over the last decade, and that relationship will not be undermined.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/01/us/graham-and-kerrey-see-possible-sa udi-9-11-link.html

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Billions wasted as MoD police fraud squad turn a blind eye to procurement crime
http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2012/03/493343.html
29:00 - Systematic fraud at the MoD as the government plans to privatise procurement. Cost plus contract fraud report by former Radar, Sonar, Communications Command and Control and Tactical Data Systems software engineer Robert McCartney. MoD police fraud squad work for MoD so will not prosecute even when there is clear evidence of fraud saying that what MoD chiefs and other ‘important people’ say ‘must be true’. Former BAe Chief Executive Admiral Sir Raymond Lygo told BBC Radio 5 in January 2004 that BAe routinely used changes to contract specification which doubled or tripled costs to taxpayers without any competition. Some of those to blame for endangering our armed forces and national security. James Arbuthnot, Michael Portillo, Greg Simpson and current LibDem Minister for Defence Procurement Nick Harvey all alleged as complicity in fraud. Is present chair of the Public Accounts Committee Margaret Hodge succeeding in cutting this fraud down? Mainstream newspapers afraid to publish known facts about MoD procurement fraud.
http://www.radio4all.net/index.php/program/58333

UK government arms contract fraud and corruption
My name is Robert McCartney. I worked in the defence industry between 1979 and 2000, when I resigned. I then reported a whole series of frauds to the MoD Police. Most of these were from 1995-2000. In 2003 I met with Lawrence Cockroft and another member of TI to explain how:
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/r.a.mccartney/ti/ti2007agm.html

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 25, 2012 12:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey guess what - this super-crook criminal just got a promotion

Former ambassador to U.S. known as ‘Bandar Bush’ is new Saudi intel chief
By Agence France-Presse - Sunday, July 22, 2012 16:30 EDT
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2012/07/22/new-saudi-intel-chief-is-former- ambassador-to-u-s-nicknamed-bandar-bush/?
RIYADH — The appointment of Saudi Arabia’s longtime envoy to the United States as intelligence chief marks an attempt to give the service a diplomatic edge at a time of turmoil in the region, analysts say.

Prince Bandar bin Sultan, who served in Washington from 1983 to 2005 and was named intelligence chief on Thursday, has the ability “to think outside the box, overcome obstacles, make decisions and work in an innovative way,” international relations analyst Abdullah al-Shummari told AFP.

He could play a key role in helping the kingdom “re-evaluate its strategies in foreign policy… (as) major geostrategic changes across the Arab world will rearrange the roles of Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Iran in the Middle East,” Shummari said.

Saudi Arabia has “an opportunity to regain its leading role” in the region after it “subsided in favour of Iran and Turkey following the September 11, 2001 attacks and the US invasion of Iraq” in 2003, he said.

Abdulaziz Sager, chairman of the Gulf Research Centre, believes that “the current situation requires greater coordination, not only on a regional level but also internationally.”

The kingdom, which had traditionally focused on maintaining strong ties with Western powers, had in recent years tried to “establish good relations with Russia and exchanged visits on the highest levels,” said Sager.

But relations with Moscow have taken a series of hits since the Arab Spring uprisings swept the region last year, notably over Russia’s support for its longtime ally Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

While Saudi Arabia has openly called for the arming of rebels fighting Assad’s regime, Russia has joined China in repeatedly using its veto to block tough action at the UN Security Council over the 16-month revolt.

The situation “requires someone accustomed to the game of interests” of international powers, Sager said, noting that Prince Bandar had achieved “several” major successes on the world stage over the years.

For instance he managed to convince Russia not to oppose UN resolutions to expel now executed Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein’s troops from Kuwait following his invasion of the emirate in 1990.

Bandar was also heavily involved in diplomatic contacts over the crisis in Lebanon that followed the 2005 assassination of former prime minister Rafiq Hariri, a key Saudi ally.

The outcry that followed the killing resulted in Syria’s withdrawal of troops and intelligence agents from its smaller neighbour, ending a three-decade presence in a boost to Saudi interests.

In 2005, Bandar also took charge of the newly created National Security Council to oversee the kingdom’s battle against Al-Qaeda following a string of deadly attacks.

The prince will retain that position even after his appointment as intelligence chief but his new posting is expected to bring him back to the limelight after a nearly five-year absence.

Born in 1949, he is son of the late crown prince Sultan bin Abdul Aziz, who died last year, and enjoyed close ties with both US president George Bush and his son, president George W. Bush.

He “is among the people who best understood US policies and managed to deal well with the decision-makers,” said Anwar Eshki, president of the Saudi-based Middle East Centre for Strategic and Legal Studies.

He “will be able to achieve better understanding between Americans and Arabs” as the Middle East faces persistent upheaval from the Arab Spring uprisings that erupted at the end of 2010, said Eshki, who worked with Bandar in Washington.

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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2013 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As the smoke clears after Saudi Arabia's latest mass execution by firing squad... Charles and Camilla fly in
The Prince isn't expected to raise the issue of human rights with his hosts. Perhaps he should, wonders Jerome Taylor
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/as-the-smoke-clear s-after-saudi-arabias-latest-mass-execution-by-firing-squad-charles-an d-camilla-fly-in-8533382.html
Jerome Taylor Wednesday 13 March 2013

Above: photograph appears to show preparations for the execution of seven men in Saudi Arabia;
Below: Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall, visit the Roman ruins in Jaresh, Jordan

They were led out at dawn today, one by one, to the public killing grounds. The Seven Saudi Arabian men had been sentenced to death following what human rights groups and the UN said were deeply flawed trials conducted under Sharia law. Some of them were juveniles when they were charged with being part of a gang of thieves in the Saudi town of Abha. But that didn’t save them from the firing squad.
A few hours later, just over 1,000 miles to the north, Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall were visiting the victims of another brutal Middle Eastern dictatorship. At a refugee camp in northern Jordan they met some of the one million people who have had to flee the death and destruction now enveloping Bashar al-Assad’s Syria. Charles described the scene he saw as an “unbelievable and heartbreaking situation” while Camilla hailed the “strength of spirit” shown by the women she encountered.
But anyone expecting the Royal couple to show equivalent sympathy for the victims of Saudi Arabia’s authoritarianism when they visit the Kingdom on Friday as part of their Middle Eastern tour will be disappointed. Human rights are off the agenda. Instead, according to the press release put out by Clarence House, the themes of the visit are “military collaboration, opportunities for women in society, inter-faith dialogue, education and environmental sustainability”.
For the struggling human rights activists and reformists in the Kingdom, visits from the US and Britain are a consistent source of disappointment. While London and Washington berate Moscow for its ongoing support of the Assad regime, they rarely if ever go public with criticisms of the Al Sauds – their closest ally in the Gulf. Last week, both the US Secretary of State, John Kerry, and the Attorney General, Eric Holder, returned from separate trips to the Kingdom. Between their visits, the Saudi regime was emboldened enough to press ahead with the jailing of Mohammed Fahd al-Qahtani and Abdullah al-Hamed – two of the country’s most prominent non-violent reform advocates. In the few days between the US delegations and Prince Charles’ arrival, the King also found time to reject clemency for the Abha Seven, despite documented evidence that confessions were extracted under torture, that the men were not appointed adequate legal representation and that most of them were juveniles when they committed their alleged crimes.
Although the Prince is officially apolitical, human rights advocates have expressed dismay that while he is happy to talk about Britain’s military and commercial links to Saudi Arabia, he avoids topics such as the highest execution rates per capita in the world or something as fundamental as a woman’s right to drive.
“Prince Charles has always had the tip of his well-polished brogues in the political world and he should use his influence to tell the royal House of Saud a few home truths about the country’s dreadful human rights record,” said Kate Allen, Amnesty International’s UK Director. “Surely, arriving in the wake of controversial executions and the jailing of human rights activists Charles will want to at least broach these matters?”
Eric Goldstein, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Middle East section, said Saudi Arabia’s allies had to do more to confront the regime over its human rights abuses. “There is no public discourse on human rights from Saudi Arabia’s allies,” he said. “We think it’s critical to raise these issues publicly.” Asked whether Prince Charles should speak out he said: “We think everyone, every government, every third party that visits Saudi Arabia should make human rights a central part of the discussions with that country.”
The Independent asked a spokesman from Clarence House whether the Prince would be bringing up human rights during the visit, but was told: “The themes and agenda of the visit... are those that have been announced already.”
There is an emphasis on the role of women in the Middle East, but both Camilla and Charles are steering clear of anything remotely controversial. In Jordan, Qatar, Oman and Saudi Arabia the focus is on visiting schools and universities for women.
Saudi Arabia has some of the highest female enrolment rates in the Gulf even if the opportunities to use their degrees is massively curtailed. But there are no plans to meet any of the women who risk jail in car-driving protests, or highlight the dozens of women detained after demonstrating for the release of political prisoners.
Instead, the royal couple will meet newly appointed female members of the Shura Council, an advisory body of technocrats appointed by King Abdullah. Critics say the recent appointment of women to the council is a purely symbolic move to appease the West and will have no palpable impact on improving the lives of women in one of the most repressive countries in the world for gender equality.
“All dictators in the past and present have used women to seek international legitimacy given the prominence of global gender equality talk,” Professor Madawi al-Rasheed, an expert on Saudia Arabia at King’s College London, told The Independent. “Such visits do more damage to the human rights cause because they give recognition to a regime that continues to oppress women and men.”

Hardline regime: Saudi Arabia’s record

Executions
Saudi Arabia has the highest execution rate per capita in the world. It still executes minors and has put 23 people to death this year compared to 76 in 2012 and 79 the year before. Public beheadings and firing squads are common.

Suppression of dissent
While the West turns a blind eye to Saudi excesses against violent Islamists, it also stays silent when peaceful reformists are imprisoned. In the last few weeks the Saudis have jailed three prominent peaceful activists, including a judge.

Women
The country remains one of the harshest places in the world to be a woman. Female Saudis cannot drive, leave their house or travel abroad without a male chaperone.

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www.v911t.org
www.thisweek.org.uk
www.abolishwar.org.uk
www.elementary.org.uk
www.radio4all.net/index.php/contributor/2149
http://utangente.free.fr/2003/media2003.pdf
"The maintenance of secrets acts like a psychic poison which alienates the possessor from the community" Carl Jung
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