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Jeremy Corbyn will be replaced by whom as Labour leader?

 
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Whitehall_Bin_Men
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 12, 2019 8:28 pm    Post subject: Jeremy Corbyn will be replaced by whom as Labour leader? Reply with quote

Who takes over from Jeremy Corbyn?
Will back Israel's war on Iran...!
May break out sooner than we think once the threat of pro Palestine Corbyn has been eliminated.


Via email...

It is no mean coincidence that Emily Thornberry was 'The One' at the eleventh hour by putting JC on the contenders list, she did it and her reward WILL come, she has been my local MP for 14 years and I have had many dealings with her, she mostly plays the long game.

The gratitude of the left will be shown and I expect Kier Starmer and John McDonnell to also be close runners. It is a fact however that JCs local support group were looking to get shot of her knowing her true intentions, however as events unfolded with the antisemite push to remove JC they kept their mits off Thornberry who as any good journo knows strikes a perculiar balance of supporting certain Palestinian concerns yet 'enjoys' her husbands family tree legacy that connects him to the infamous Lord Balfour, no less!

and lo, the most suitable candidate appears, of course, I COULD be wrong about my predictions but I was privvy to the worried discussions in a North London pub just days prior to his successful bid to be leader and I note how Thornbury has, along with JC, refused to respond to the Palestine Solidarity Campaigns regular questionaire that is sent to all contenders to garner their thoughts on the key subjects they cater for...

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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony Blair and the Blairites: The neoliberal tribute band who still have the Labour Party dancing to their tune
Neil Clark
https://www.rt.com/op-ed/472118-tony-blair-corbyn-brexit-labour/

is a journalist, writer, broadcaster and blogger. His award winning blog can be found at www.neilclark66.blogspot.com. He tweets on politics and world affairs @NeilClark66
29 Oct, 2019 16:22
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Tony Blair and the Blairites: The neoliberal tribute band who still have the Labour Party dancing to their tune
Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair (L) and the leader of the opposition Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, London, Britain, November 13, 2016 © Reuters / Toby Melville
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By failing to move against Tony Blair and his disciples in the Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn has become their prisoner. He is now basically the leader in name only, as the party’s recent Brexit/general election U-turns show.
Question: Who is the current leader of the Labour Party? Well, if you answer ‘Jeremy Corbyn,’ you’d be technically correct, but that’s as far as it goes. The man who is really calling the shots is Tony Blair, despite stepping down as party leader, and prime minister, 12 years ago. The truth is that Corbyn is now no more than a figurehead, reduced to echoing Blair’s own utterances.

Back in 2015, Labour supporters had valid grounds for believing that things were really going to change. During his successful campaign to become Labour leader that year, the 100-1 shot Jeremy Corbyn, a veteran anti-war leftist, said he was convinced that the Iraq War was illegal and that Tony Blair, if he had committed a war crime, should be put on trial. Labour members, desperate for a clean break with Blairism and all it represented, took great heart that they were getting their party back. Corbyn was still prepared to call for an investigation into Blair as late as May 2016. But since then, it’s all gone very quiet on the anti-war front.

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When, in November 2016, the SNP’s Alex Salmond tabled a motion calling for Blair to be held to account for allegedly misleading parliament over the Iraq War, it was defeated by 439 votes to 70. Jeremy Corbyn, the one-time chair of Stop the War, didn’t turn up. The reason given was that he had a ‘longstanding engagement in his constituency.’ The Guardian noted that several of Corbyn’s “key allies” including Diane Abbott and John McDonnell didn’t show up either. The message to Blair and the Blairites was clear: ‘We’re not going to pursue you on this one. It’s over.’

Instead of moving against Blair and his acolytes in the Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP), Corbyn and his ‘key allies’ backed off and sought to accommodate them in the interests of ‘party unity.’ Members who voted overwhelmingly for Corbyn in two leadership elections no doubt hoped that his victories would mark an end to establishment-friendly Blairism. In fact, Blair and the Blairites have regrouped and now have Corbyn exactly where they want him. Which is in a terribly weak position. Corbyn is in a box, but as someone on Twitter said yesterday, he’s been handing his enemies the hammer and the nails.

A key turning point was Corbyn’s failure to act swiftly and decisively against his enemies following the 2017 general election. That election was supposed to mark the end of Corbynism, but the party did extremely well, recording its highest increase in the share of the popular vote since 1945.

The Blairites, who had done so much to undermine Corbyn from 2015, knew they were in a weak position the morning after the night before, so urged ‘party unity’ on the grounds that a new general election was “just around the corner.” Corbyn fell for it, showing remarkable clemency when he should have been ruthless. The idea of mandatory reselections was dropped and in its place came ‘trigger ballots’ which have actually helped to maintain the status quo.

As Sienna Rodgers noted in the Guardian, “the reality is that, far from facilitating a Corbynite takeover, the trigger-ballot battles taking place across the country have allowed the Labour leader’s critics to come out largely unscathed and better organized than ever.”

Instead of Blairites being purged, it’s been left-wing supporters of Jeremy Corbyn like Chris Williamson who have been purged, and Corbyn has done little or nothing to help them. In fact, left-wingers have had a more stressful time at the hands of the Kafkaesque party disciplinary machinery under Corbyn’s leadership than they had under Blair and Brown!

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‘Tony Blair can f**k off & die’: Lib Dems party like it’s 2003 with controversial singalong (VIDEO)
In 2017, one of the reasons why Labour did so well was their pledge to respect the 2016 EU Referendum results. Labour managed to hold on to key pro-Leave seats in the North and Midlands and even make 28 gains from the Tories. But the Blairites were determined to get the party to shift to a more pro-EU position and they have succeeded, with the People’s Vote campaign playing a key role.

In 2017, John McDonnell quite rightly slammed Tony Blair’s criticism of Labour’s Brexit policy. Stressing that the result of the referendum had to be respected, the shadow chancellor said “To be frank, Mr Blair hasn’t really listened to the nature of the debate that is going on in the pubs, the clubs and school gates.”

Yet two years on, McDonnell and Corbyn are literally echoing Blair’s line.

Take the party’s opposition to an early general election. For over two years, the line was ‘Bring it on, we want an election now.’ Then, on September 1, Guru Tony spoke, and since then Labour – to the increasing frustration of its members – has blocked an election three times.


Neil Clark

@NeilClark66
The Leader of the Labour Party. https://twitter.com/InstituteGC/status/1188538710373163008

Tony Blair Institute

@InstituteGC
Tony Blair: An extension doesn’t stop No Deal because Brexit is a tale of two deals. The second negotiation on the future relationship between Britain and the EU means No Deal remains on the table

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Today, we learn that Labour will now back a December election (having voted against it only yesterday), but only after the SNP and Liberal Democrats said they would vote for it, meaning it would have gone through anyway. Yet, Blairite opposition to a December poll continues.

READ MORE: Putting off the inevitable? UK lawmakers reject BoJo’s snap election proposal

The U-turns of the Labour leadership have been spectacular. In September 2016, John McDonnell received loud applause from the BBC Question Time audience when he told Alastair Campbell, Blair’s former communications chief, that he was the “person above all else, who actually created a political environment where no one believed a word a politician said.” Yet in October 2019, McDonnell, in a very friendly interview with Campbell, said he did not support his interlocutor’s expulsion from the party. Campbell, like Blair, has been pushing for a second referendum – with Remain as an option – to come before any general election.

Labour’s shift to a ‘Remain in all but name’ position has, quite predictably, seen it plummet in the polls.


Britain Elects
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Opinium (Con +16), Deltapoll (Con +13) and YouGov (Con +15) all showing Conservative leads in excess of 10pts.

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Adopting a Brexit-blocking/delaying stance makes no sense electorally, given that most of the key marginals the party must win in England and Wales to achieve victory are Tory-held, pro-Leave ones.

It’s hard to escape the conclusion that in urging such a suicidal course of action on him, the Blairites want Corbyn to fail, so that any subsequent election defeat can be blamed on ‘the left,’ whereas in fact it was the left trying to appease and accommodate pro-EU Blairites which is largely behind Labour’s abysmal poll ratings.

Looking at the wider picture, what’s happened to Jeremy Corbyn should make socialists very sceptical of the notion that real, meaningful change can be achieved through the parliamentary system alone in an era of neoliberal globalization. As Labour activist Josh Jackson tweeted yesterday: “A major problem of the left in Britain is that we don’t have leadership outside of parliament.”


Josh Jackson
@JoshuaYJackson
A major problem of the Left in Britain is we don’t have leadership outside of parliament. All of our leaders are rooted in parliamentarianism as opposed to having genuine popular power among the working class. Thus our fortune is dependent on parliamentary games and not workers.

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To keep Corbyn and McDonnell honest, there needed to be extra-parliamentary pressure on them from a UK Gilets-Jaunes-style movement.

But instead, all the pressure has come from the faux-left and the right.

Faced with the choice of upsetting socialists, or upsetting their opponents, the Labour leadership has chosen to upset socialists – perhaps in the belief that they’ll still vote for the party anyway. Thus Labour will go into the next election with the uber-Blairite Dame Margaret Hodge, the most vehement critic of Corbyn, as a parliamentary candidate, but not the re-suspended Chris Williamson, Corbyn’s most loyal supporter – and just about the only MP to have spoken up for Julian Assange.


George Galloway

@georgegalloway
First @jeremycorbyn you betrayed me. Then Ken, Marc, Jackie and @DerbyChrisW and thousands of others. You preferred the company of those whose dearest wish and whose every waking hour was dedicated to destroying you. You have made your bed and now you must lie in it. #Vaz #Hodge

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The truth is that even if Corbyn were to defy the polls once again and lead Labour to an against-the-odds election ‘victory’ in December (if an election then is confirmed), the pro-status-quo PLP would either prevent him becoming PM or else act as a brake on anything too radical being enacted.

At the moment, it’s looking like game, set and match to Tony Blair, the Labour leader who never really went away. We shouldn’t be too surprised at the way things have turned out. At Oxford in the 1970s, Blair co-founded a band called Ugly Rumours, for whom he sang and played guitar. So you could say he’s got rather used to people dancing to his tune.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 2:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Destroyed by appeasing his enemies: The Shakespearean tragedy of Jeremy Corbyn
appeasing his enemies: The Shakespearean tragedy of Jeremy Corbyn
https://www.rt.com/op-ed/475891-corbyn-general-election-destroyed/

Neil Clark is a journalist, writer, broadcaster and blogger. His award winning blog can be found at www.neilclark66.blogspot.com. He tweets on politics and world affairs @NeilClark66
14 Dec, 2019 11:50

The Jeremy Corbyn project has ended in tears with an utterly demoralising general election defeat for Labour, but it could – and should – have been very different if only Corbyn had trusted his own instincts.
There is a distinctly Shakespearean air to the political demise of UK Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, which took place, appropriately enough, on Friday the 13th of December 2019 (or you could say 15 March would have been even more appropriate).

“There is a tide in the affairs of men, which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and miseries,” the great bard wrote in ‘Julius Caesar’.

Jeremy Corbyn was never in a stronger position than on the morning of the day after the general election of June 2017. Against all the odds and punditocracy predictions, he had taken Labour to the brink of a stunning victory. The 40 percent of the vote Labour attained in that election represented the biggest increase in the share of the popular vote the party had achieved in over 70 years. But fatally, Corbyn didn’t take the tide at the flood. He should have used the moment to move swiftly and decisively against his ‘centrist’ enemies in the party who had done so much to undermine him. Instead, he held out an olive branch to them. They repaid his magnanimity by plotting the downfall which came to a head so spectacularly this week.


Matt Kennard
@DCKennard
52% of voters—17.4 million people— voted to leave the EU in 2016, many of them Labour voters.

They had absolutely no idea why they were being asked by Labour to vote again. And they were right.

2nd ref was always an establishment stitch up to reverse a result they didn’t like.

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Phase One of the plan was to get Labour to sign up to an electorally suicidal shift on Brexit. Labour did so well in 2017 largely because it gave a clear manifesto commitment to respect the result of the 2016 referendum. But great pressure was exerted on Corbyn to agree to a change in policy and pledge Labour to support a second referendum. Years earlier, Corbyn had, quite rightly, attacked the EU for making the Irish vote again after they had rejected the Lisbon Treaty. But asking Labour Leavers to vote again on whether to leave the EU is precisely what Corbyn was doing in the 2019 general election. It’s true that others were constructing his political coffin, but it’s also true that Corbyn handed them the nails.


Tris Stock
@Tris_Stock
The irony lost on most Right-leaning commenters, that identify Labour as the hard-Left, is that it is the Right-wing of the party that supported Remain. If Labour were actually hard-Left, it would have backed Leave.

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Phase Two of the plan to ‘Get Corbyn’ was to promote a narrative that Labour under his leadership was absolutely awash with anti-Semitism. Corbyn’s enemies wanted us to believe that Labour, a party which always prided itself on its anti-racist credentials, and which had a Jewish leader as recently as 2015, was in fact a racist party. Incredibly, this audacious campaign succeeded because Corbyn failed to call it out. The level of actual anti-Semitism in Labour was tiny, but the Labour leader accepted the narrative that there was a big problem to deal with. The result of his continually going on the back-foot was that he and his party were denounced as ‘anti-Semitic’ on an almost hourly basis. Chris Williamson, a loyal Corbyn ally, was thrown under the bus on trumped-up charges. But this appeasement only led to the campaign being ratcheted up still further.

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Labour’s failure to realise this was a 2nd Brexit referendum hands Britain to Boris
Corbyn paid a very heavy price for the mistakes he made in the period 2017-19. The party’s backtracking on Brexit saw them haemorrhage support in their traditional pro-Leave Northern heartlands and lose working-class seats in the election that they had held for generations. Labour lost Blyth Valley for the first time ever. Wrexham in North Wales went Conservative for the first time ever. Great Grimsby was lost by Labour for the first time in 74 years. 71 percent of voters there had voted Leave in 2016. Yet Labour was asking them to vote again, next year. How absurd.


Albert Trigg
@alberttrigg
I see phase 2 of the coup against Corbyn is already in full swing aided by the complicit media

The right of the party vociferous in playing down Brexit as the main factor for defeat and are championing a "centrist" direction in policy & leader

Lol

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Bearing in mind all the hope of real, meaningful change that Corbyn had inspired in the first years of his Labour leadership, it is shattering to contemplate how it all went horribly wrong.

How Shakespearean that Corbyn, a lifelong Eurosceptic, should be politically destroyed by agreeing a pivot towards Remain – which he must have known was quite crazy. How Shakespearean that Corbyn, a veteran supporter of Palestinian rights, should be so submissive in the face of what the great Israeli journalist Gideon Levy described as a ‘contract’ taken out on him by the ‘Israeli propaganda machine’.

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Corbyn’s failure to hit back forcefully – or indeed hit back at all – against the smear campaigns of his enemies was praised by some as signs of his Zen-like calm, but to millions of others it looked like weakness. In last week’s leaders’ debate, Boris Johnson labelled Corbyn a supporter of the IRA. Corbyn said nothing in response.

For all his decency, it’s undeniable that Corbyn – when he got to the brink of power – treated his enemies much better than he did his friends. That, sadly, will be his epitaph. A golden opportunity for the left in Britain has been squandered.

“Men at some times are masters of their fates. The fault, Dear Brutus, is not in our stars, but in ourselves, that we are underlings.”

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‘Disappointed’ Corbyn vows to lead Labour party through ‘process of reflection’ but not into next election
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Last edited by TonyGosling on Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:24 am; edited 1 time in total
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 14, 2019 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Peter Mandelson: I try to undermine Jeremy Corbyn 'every single day'
Ex-minister speaks out against Labour leader as Blairite peers express fury about Corbyn’s position on Brexit in Lords debate

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/21/peter-mandelson-i-try- to-undermine-jeremy-corbyn-every-day

Peter Mandelson, close friend of Jacob Rothschild and the architect of New Labour, has said he is working every day to undermine Jeremy Corbyn, as Blairite peers stood up in the House of Lords to lambast their party’s leadership for backing Brexit.

Mandelson, a former cabinet minister under Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, told an event for the Jewish Chronicle that he was actively working to bring an end to Corbyn’s leadership.

His comments will be inflammatory at a time when Labour MPs have toned down their public opposition to Corbyn, after his second leadership election by a huge margin in the autumn.

Mandelson, who has made no secret of his antipathy to Corbyn’s leadership, told the newspaper’s editor, Stephen Pollard: “The problem with Jeremy is not that he is a sort of maniac – it’s not as though he is a nasty person. It’s that he literally has no idea in the 21st century how to conduct himself as a leader of a party putting itself forward in a democratic election to become the government of our country.”

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He added: “Why do you want to just walk away and pass the title deeds of this great party over to someone like Jeremy Corbyn? I don’t want to, I resent it, and I work every single day in some small way to bring forward the end of his tenure in office.

“Something, however small it may be – an email, a phone call or a meeting I convene – every day I try to do something to save the Labour party from his leadership.”

In response, a Labour source hit back at the peer, suggesting Mandelson was part of the establishment. “The idea of Jeremy Corbyn being prime minister and implementing policies that actually benefit the people terrifies the establishment, so it’s no surprise Peter Mandelson has found time in his busy schedule of spending time on oligarch’s yachts to attempt to undermine him,” the source said.


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There is little appetite for another challenge to Corbyn among MPs, but a number of peers expressed fury about the leadership’s position on Brexit on the second day of debate on the Brexit bill in the House of Lords.

In defiance of the shadow cabinet’s collective support for triggering article 50, Roger Liddle, a former special adviser on Europe to Blair and now a peer, said Corbyn had failed to fight plans for a hard Brexit and instead marched his MPs through the division lobbies to vote for it.

Echoing the intervention of Blair on Friday, he said: “Let’s be frank, and I do say this with terrible sadness, the debilitation of our own party contributed to Brexit. We have a leader who, unlike the vast majority of Labour members including many of those who joined up in order to support him, has never been a European true believer.

“And in the referendum he failed the key test of democratic politics, which is to cut through media cynicism and the mass of seething public discontents with a compelling and positive case for Europe which forced voters to listen.

“And now I see no clarion call for the fight, only a three-line whip in the Commons to force Labour MPs to troop through the lobbies alongside a rightwing Tory government dancing to Iain Duncan Smith’s tune.”

Another peer, David Triesman, a former Labour minister, said: “Keir Starmer [the shadow Brexit secretary] has done a fine job, a heroic job in many ways, but I don’t think anybody could say that opposition has been shown fully. I think, for example, the prime minister probably came here yesterday in order to seek a nostalgic reminder of what opposition was like.”

Spencer Livermore, a Labour peer and former adviser to Ed Miliband, also criticised his own party for backing Brexit.

“I have great humility about the outcome of the referendum and about the unelected nature of this house, but if we sincerely believe the course we are on will do untold damage to our country we have a duty whether elected or unelected to say so, to oppose it and to tell the truth,” he said. “I believe that working people’s lives will be made worse by this bill.”

The discontent in the House of Lords comes amid jitters within Labour about the party’s prospects of holding the Copeland seat - one of the two byelections on Thursday.

Gale-force winds and heavy rain could have a dramatic effect on turnout in the contests in both Copeland and Stoke, Labour sources have said, with some fearing any negative effect could hand victory to the Conservatives in Cumbria.

Some Labour MPs said they were increasingly concerned about the effects of Storm Doris on turnout and those that had visited the seats said the Tory campaigns were growing in confidence.

“Turnout is going to be the problem for us. I think people on a cold day in February will think: ‘Oh, why should I bother?’” one Labour MP said. “The Tories were only a handful of votes behind Ukip and I think they could even win in Stoke. If you’re an anti-Labour voter, and they are the majority in Stoke, you could decide to vote Tory. It could happen with a low turnout.”

However, another Labour source said a low turnout did not necessarily mean there would be a Conservative victory in Cumbria.

“The Tories need people to turn out just as much as we do,” the source said. “We have a very strong ground operation up there. It is genuinely impressive and disciplined considering the geography. The messaging is simply: we are committed to nuclear power and focused on saving the maternity services.”

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Another Labour backbencher said they believed the party’s relentless focus on the NHS would see them clinch Copeland. “I am getting the sense that the NHS has really punched through, as indeed it should. Campaign issues-wise, this is almost the perfect byelection for us.”

The exact timing and course of Storm Doris remains uncertain, the Met Office said, but it is forecasting gale-force winds late on Thursday morning. The warning added: “There is potential for a short-lived core of very strong winds to develop. While some disruption is expected outside of this stronger swath of winds, the amber area looks most likely to see more significant disruption.”

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 17, 2019 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leaked to the i-paper!
Next Labour leader: Rebecca Long-Bailey emerges as chosen candidate of Jeremy Corbyn supporters
https://inews.co.uk/news/politics/rebecca-long-bailey-next-labour-lead er-election-jeremy-corbyn-1342011
John McDonnell called for a female leader and a 'non-metropolitan candidate'

By Nigel Morris
Monday, 16th December 2019, 9:59 am

Rebecca Long-Bailey, the shadow Business Secretary, is emerging as anointed leadership candidate of Jeremy Corbyn’s allies on the Labour left.

The MP for Salford and Eccles was given a high profile during the election campaign, filling in for Mr Corbyn in a seven-way televised debate.

John McDonnell, the shadow Chancellor, said Labour’s next leader should be a woman and told BBC1’s Andrew Marr Show that it was “most probably time for a non-metropolitan” candidate with a “northern voice”.

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Other potential candidates include Angela Rayner, Emily Thornberry, Sir Keir Starmer and David Lammy.

Centrist MPs could swing behind the former frontbencher, Lisa Nandy, who said she was “seriously thinking” about running for the leadership.

Corbyn to blame

The Wigan MP said it was “undoubtedly true” that Mr Corbyn was to blame for the devastating defeat, but argued the party’s policy platform was popular.

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Jess Phillips, the MP for Birmingham Yardley, who has been a fierce critic of the Corbyn leadership, is also considering a leadership bid.

In an article for the Observer, she said Labour faced an “existential problem” that working-class voters do not believe the party is “better than the Tories”.


Among the potential candidates to take over Jeremy Corbyn as Labour party leader is Birmingham Yardley MP Jess Phillips(Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire)
She wrote: “It’s time to try something different. The truth is, there are corners of our party that have become too intolerant of challenge and debate.”

Mr McDonnell described her as “really talented”, but said he “prefers others” to her for the top job.

Labour also faces a contest for the deputy leadership after Tom Watson stood down from Parliament at the election.

Burgon and Butler

Shadow Cabinet members Richard Burgon, who is backing Ms Long-Bailey for the leadership, and Dawn Butler are among early candidates.

Ms Rayner could run for the deputy leadership and give her support to her friend Ms Long-Bailey. The two women met at the weekend to discuss the position.

Len McCluskey, the general secretary of Unite, said Ms Long-Bailey and Ms Rayner would “carry on the tradition” and deliver “a radical alternative to the misery that is being caused for 10 years by a Tory government”.

Mr Corbyn has asked for his successor to be elected by the end of March. It is expected that the contest will get underway on 7 January.

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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 18, 2019 1:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tony Blair and Peter Mandelson secretly ‘pulling the strings’ in plot to sabotage Brexit
TONY BLAIR and Peter Mandelson are said to be secretly “pulling the strings” in the Labour Party and Lib Dems Remainer alliance, by giving proxy advice.
By RACHEL RUSSELL
PUBLISHED: 14:46, Wed, Sep 11, 2019 | UPDATED: 15:12, Wed, Sep 11, 2019

https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1176689/brexit-news-latest-no- deal-election-remain-blair-mandelson-boris-johnson-corbyn-labour

Theresa May laughs with Ken Clarke during Boris answer

The former Labour Prime Minister and the ex-EU commissioner are believed to have been at the centre of MPs’ plot to block a no deal Brexit on October 31 through a change in the law last week. A source said: “Blair and Mandelson are pulling the strings.

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“Mandelson is the puppet master, he has had meetings via proxy with all the parties involved in the Remain alliance and sends emails with ideas.

“Blair’s people have been speaking to Jo Swinson’s people.”

A source within the Remain camp told The Telegraph Lord Mandelson has been an “outspoken supporter of the People’s Vote”.

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He sent representatives every week to the Tuesday meetings of the Remain alliance at the EU Commission building in Westminster’s Smith Square.

Tony Blair was said to be part of a remainer plot
Tony Blair was said to be part of a remainer plot (Image: GETTY)
Peter Mandelson is also said to be helping

Peter Mandelson is also said to be helping "pull the strings" (Image: GETTY)
Another source also claimed Mr Blair’s former special adviser Lance Price held meetings with Ms Swinson’s staff, even though the Lib Dem leader was not there in person.

Mr Price said yesterday he was “not directly involved” with the Remain alliance.

He said: “I’m just an interested observer”.

The Lib Dems announced this week they would campaign for Article 50 to be revoked at the next election.

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Jeremy Corbyn was reportedly advised to not back an election

Jeremy Corbyn was reportedly advised to not back an election (Image: GETTY)
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A Lib Dem source said: “She’s trying to create clear yellow water between her and Labour now that Labour are backing Remain.

“She wants to be seen as the paramilitary wing of Remain because internal polling and focus groups have shown that the Lib Dems are losing a bit of ground to Labour on the issue.

“She doesn’t want the party to be squeezed out by the two main parties.

“She thinks that a Corbyn’s unelectability, the uncertainty around Brexit and the current parliamentary arithmetic could result in it all falling into her lap.

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Mr Mandelson strongly backed remain during the 2016 EU referendum

Mr Mandelson strongly backed remain during the 2016 EU referendum (Image: GETTY)
“She thinks there’s a small chance she could end up being Prime Minister.”

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has called for a general election 50 times this year, the Telegraph reported.

But he voted against motions to hold a snap election on October 15 last week and on Monday.

This was because he wanted to support the motion once the Benn bill had received royal assent.

Mr Blair warned Mr Corbyn of falling into an

Mr Blair warned Mr Corbyn of falling into an "elephant trap" (Image: GETTY)
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But he may have been pressured by former shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer and other Blairites to not support an election until after the Prime Minister was forced to seek a delay to Article 50 until January 31.

Mr Blair warned Mr Corbyn that an election before October 31 would be “an elephant trap”.

He said: “Boris Johnson knows that if a no-deal Brexit stands on its own as a proposition, it might well fail.

“But if he mixes it up with the Brexit pledge and the Corbyn question together in a general election, he could succeed, despite a majority being against a no-deal Brexit because some may fear a Corbyn premiership more.

“If the government tries to force an election now, Labour should vote against it.”


TonyGosling wrote:
Peter Mandelson: I try to undermine Jeremy Corbyn 'every single day'
Ex-minister speaks out against Labour leader as Blairite peers express fury about Corbyn’s position on Brexit in Lords debate

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/feb/21/peter-mandelson-i-try- to-undermine-jeremy-corbyn-every-day

Peter Mandelson, close friend of Jacob Rothschild and the architect of New Labour, has said he is working every day to undermine Jeremy Corbyn, as Blairite peers stood up in the House of Lords to lambast their party’s leadership for backing Brexit.

Mandelson, a former cabinet minister under Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, told an event for the Jewish Chronicle that he was actively working to bring an end to Corbyn’s leadership.

His comments will be inflammatory at a time when Labour MPs have toned down their public opposition to Corbyn, after his second leadership election by a huge margin in the autumn.

Mandelson, who has made no secret of his antipathy to Corbyn’s leadership, told the newspaper’s editor, Stephen Pollard: “The problem with Jeremy is not that he is a sort of maniac – it’s not as though he is a nasty person. It’s that he literally has no idea in the 21st century how to conduct himself as a leader of a party putting itself forward in a democratic election to become the government of our country.”

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He added: “Why do you want to just walk away and pass the title deeds of this great party over to someone like Jeremy Corbyn? I don’t want to, I resent it, and I work every single day in some small way to bring forward the end of his tenure in office.

“Something, however small it may be – an email, a phone call or a meeting I convene – every day I try to do something to save the Labour party from his leadership.”

In response, a Labour source hit back at the peer, suggesting Mandelson was part of the establishment. “The idea of Jeremy Corbyn being prime minister and implementing policies that actually benefit the people terrifies the establishment, so it’s no surprise Peter Mandelson has found time in his busy schedule of spending time on oligarch’s yachts to attempt to undermine him,” the source said.


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There is little appetite for another challenge to Corbyn among MPs, but a number of peers expressed fury about the leadership’s position on Brexit on the second day of debate on the Brexit bill in the House of Lords.

In defiance of the shadow cabinet’s collective support for triggering article 50, Roger Liddle, a former special adviser on Europe to Blair and now a peer, said Corbyn had failed to fight plans for a hard Brexit and instead marched his MPs through the division lobbies to vote for it.

Echoing the intervention of Blair on Friday, he said: “Let’s be frank, and I do say this with terrible sadness, the debilitation of our own party contributed to Brexit. We have a leader who, unlike the vast majority of Labour members including many of those who joined up in order to support him, has never been a European true believer.

“And in the referendum he failed the key test of democratic politics, which is to cut through media cynicism and the mass of seething public discontents with a compelling and positive case for Europe which forced voters to listen.

“And now I see no clarion call for the fight, only a three-line whip in the Commons to force Labour MPs to troop through the lobbies alongside a rightwing Tory government dancing to Iain Duncan Smith’s tune.”

Another peer, David Triesman, a former Labour minister, said: “Keir Starmer [the shadow Brexit secretary] has done a fine job, a heroic job in many ways, but I don’t think anybody could say that opposition has been shown fully. I think, for example, the prime minister probably came here yesterday in order to seek a nostalgic reminder of what opposition was like.”

Spencer Livermore, a Labour peer and former adviser to Ed Miliband, also criticised his own party for backing Brexit.

“I have great humility about the outcome of the referendum and about the unelected nature of this house, but if we sincerely believe the course we are on will do untold damage to our country we have a duty whether elected or unelected to say so, to oppose it and to tell the truth,” he said. “I believe that working people’s lives will be made worse by this bill.”

The discontent in the House of Lords comes amid jitters within Labour about the party’s prospects of holding the Copeland seat - one of the two byelections on Thursday.

Gale-force winds and heavy rain could have a dramatic effect on turnout in the contests in both Copeland and Stoke, Labour sources have said, with some fearing any negative effect could hand victory to the Conservatives in Cumbria.

Some Labour MPs said they were increasingly concerned about the effects of Storm Doris on turnout and those that had visited the seats said the Tory campaigns were growing in confidence.

“Turnout is going to be the problem for us. I think people on a cold day in February will think: ‘Oh, why should I bother?’” one Labour MP said. “The Tories were only a handful of votes behind Ukip and I think they could even win in Stoke. If you’re an anti-Labour voter, and they are the majority in Stoke, you could decide to vote Tory. It could happen with a low turnout.”

However, another Labour source said a low turnout did not necessarily mean there would be a Conservative victory in Cumbria.

“The Tories need people to turn out just as much as we do,” the source said. “We have a very strong ground operation up there. It is genuinely impressive and disciplined considering the geography. The messaging is simply: we are committed to nuclear power and focused on saving the maternity services.”

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Another Labour backbencher said they believed the party’s relentless focus on the NHS would see them clinch Copeland. “I am getting the sense that the NHS has really punched through, as indeed it should. Campaign issues-wise, this is almost the perfect byelection for us.”

The exact timing and course of Storm Doris remains uncertain, the Met Office said, but it is forecasting gale-force winds late on Thursday morning. The warning added: “There is potential for a short-lived core of very strong winds to develop. While some disruption is expected outside of this stronger swath of winds, the amber area looks most likely to see more significant disruption.”

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 21, 2019 10:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Le Cochon Bleu wrote:

I don't think it's a good idea to blame the awful omission Labour manifesto which ignored and would reverse Brexit on Jeremy Corbyn.
I think what's really likely is that Corbyn had to put up with it, along with the faithful who actually voted Labour.
All the private sources I've heard suggest strongly that Jeremy abhors the EU and would be out of it fully tomorrow if he could manage it.
I think there are three huge issues.
1. Jeremy had literally no chance of getting any support for any Brexit policy from not only the higher-ups in political Labour but also the majority of MPs. (Who are mostly light years away from reflecting the Labour votership's attitudes on Brexit.)
2. There was also no way the political Labour Party would consider anything kind of Brexit but the very lightest of BriNOs possible - Customs Union, single market, the tightest alignment to Brussels.
Jeremy wasn't given a choice. If supporting a hard Brexit, he'd be in a minority of around 25 to 35 Labour MPs in all of Westminster's Labour lot, and basically NONE of the higher-ups.
Think of massive Remainers such as Starmer and Thornberry - two of the biggest Remainers in the world, and that's not far from par for the course within any of around 50 or 60 more senior MPs who could hold a shadow cabinet position. The Commons party is MASSIVELY devoted to Brussels.
Corbyn simply had no choice. His opinion as one person in this huge sea of the strongest Europhiles was absolutely irrelevant.
Starmer, Thornberry and some others would still do anything to stop Brexit. Anything. Regardless of what Labour voters have demonstrated about Brexit, which Starmer etc wish to blame on Corbyn.
3. Labour only did as well as it did for one reason. That single reason is Jeremy Corbyn. No question.
Corbyn has been hiding from the public the most unelectable bunch of self-obsessed, space cadet losers any major political party has ever seen.
The truth is that when Corbyn goes, their support will plummet. In constituency after constituency after constituency there will be thousands of fence sitting voters who don't much like the Conservatives but will vote for them, will vote Lib Dem, Green, SNP, Reform Party, anyone but these Blairite, Islington orientated, champagne quaffing nonces.
https://www.facebook.com/gavanconnolly

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 22, 2019 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Labour humiliation: Secret dossier reveals shocking extent of Corbyn delusion
JEREMY CORBYN’S Labour Party carried out a bizarre campaign strategy during the 2019 general election, which saw the party target Tory Leave areas and ignore polling data to the detriment of 59 Labour MPs.
By EMILY FERGUSON
11:52, Sun, Dec 22, 2019 | UPDATED: 14:29, Sun, Dec 22, 2019
https://www.express.co.uk/news/politics/1220137/labour-party-news-Jere my-Corbyn-general-election-campaign-strategy-election-2019

Labour Party is ‘one mistake away from oblivion’ says ex-MP
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A secret dossier, published by The Sunday Times, has revealed Labour’s electoral strategy, which saw the party target almost 100 key constituencies - including several “deep blue” seats that overwhelmingly backed Brexit in the 2016 EU referendum. Strategists channelled millions of pounds into target areas, which critics dubbed an attempt to overcome Labour’s pro-EU wing. The election plot, which was hidden from the shadow cabinet and key staff throughout the campaign, also appeared to select seats on the basis of vindictive internal politics.

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The dossier, leaked by an internal critic, was drafted by two of Mr Corbyn’s closest aides: Karie Murphy and Seumas Milne, who have been reluctant to step down following Labour’s worst defeat in almost a century.

The document of target seats was last updated several weeks before the nationwide vote, on November 15, and evidenced Ms Murphy’s claim she would ignore polling data and conventional strategy throughout the campaign.

Strategists split the 86 target seats into “offensive” and “defensive” seats, the former saw the party attempt to win the seat from rival parties, while the latter were Labour marginals it wanted to hold onto.

The majority of the 60 offensive seats were Leave-voting Tory seats in the Midlands, the north of England and Wales - which saw the biggest swings against Mr Corbyn’s party, according to BBC analysis.

Jeremy Corbyn news
Jeremy Corbyn's election strategy has been revealed (Image: Getty)
Labour Party election strategy
Karie Murphy helped devise Labour's 2019 election strategy (Image: Getty)
For example, the party attempted to win eurosceptic areas such as Stourbridge, Dover and Gloucester - which all had a majority of over 5,000.

Despite Labour’s attempts to win over voters, the Tories increased their majority to more than 10,000.

The bold strategy to target the “deep blue” seats highlights the huge flaws in Labour’s campaign.

One critic dubbed it “deranged optimism” - a desire to fight a bold campaign after Labour’s near miss in the 2017 general election.

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Labour Party Remain
One insider claims the strategy was a plot to overcome Labour's pro-EU wing (Image: Getty)
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But another party insider argued the strategy was party of a plot to rid the party of its pro-EU wing once and for all.

They claimed that Ms Murphy and her close friend Len McCluskey, the general secretary of Unite, imposed the strategy to “prove wrong” Remainers such as Sir Heir Starmer and Emily Thornberry, who had long argued that Labour should back Remain.

Other target seats suggest the strategists selected constituencies on the basis of vindictive internal politics, such as trying to oust Luciana Berger, who quit the Labour Party over its handling of antisemitism allegations.

Labour invested significant resources into Finchley and Golders Green, where she was campaigning to stand as a the Lib Dem candidate.

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Ruth Smeeth
Ruth Smeeth said the document highlight's Labour's 'incompetence' (Image: Stoke Sentinel)
Neither party ended up winning the seat, with the Tory incumbent Mike Freer increasing his majority threefold.

Strategists also appeared to turn their backs on Labour MPs who were sceptical of Mr Corbyn’s leadership.

This included Ruth Smeeth, Mary Creagh and Melanie Onn - who all lost their seats in the election.

The party also failed to target Workington in Cumbria as a defensive seat, despite warnings from a Tory think tank the constituency could be a key battleground.

Brexit news
Britain is due to leave the EU on January 31 (Image: Express)
Labour lost the seat to the Tories, as it lost a whopping 12 percent of the voting share since the 2017 election.

In response to the leaked document, Ms Smeeth said: “This dossier just further confirms the incompetence at the highest levels of the Labour Party — not only have they failed to recognise the challenges that we face in terms of leadership, racism in the party and our Brexit policy, they also had no idea how to run the campaign.

“Good colleagues lost by hundreds of votes because seemingly no one in head office was prepared to look at data — they should be ashamed of themselves.”

A party insider said the campaign was given the flexibility to work “around” the list and marshal resources as circumstances required.

Luciana Berger
The strategy appeared to target Luciana Berger's seat (Image: PA)
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The source who leaked the document said lessons need to be learned from Labour’s colossal defeat.

They said: “We need to know that Corbyn’s successors won’t repeat past mistakes and prioritise winning stupid ideological battles over winning power.

“That applies to both our next leader and their team.”

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Martin Van Creveld: Let me quote General Moshe Dayan: "Israel must be like a mad dog, too dangerous to bother."
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 13, 2020 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Whoever signs up to this poison


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 18, 2020 12:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 09, 2020 3:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Starmer and Assange!
The case against Keir Starmer
https://www.versobooks.com/blogs/4555-the-case-against-keir-starmer

Keir Starmer has made his pitch for the Labour leadership on a promise to retain the party's left-wing policies, whilst also being pragmatic and electable. Yet, as Oliver Eagleton writes, a look at his chequered career to date puts his left credentials in severe doubt.
5d6f658f240000ba027362ff-
Sir Keir Starmer’s campaign for the Labour leadership has somewhat glossed over his recent parliamentary record. That’s hardly surprising given that his tenure as shadow Brexit secretary is not his strongest selling point. The MP for Holborn and St Pancras devised a Remain policy that courted People’s Voters at the expense of red wall seats. While Corbyn tried to map out a viable Brexit plan after the 2016 referendum, inveighing against EU state-aid rules and competition directives, Sir Keir broke with the leadership, refused to formulate a Leave programme (aside from his deliberately unworkable ‘six tests’), and steered the party towards a second referendum. As many have argued, this was the perhaps the single biggest reason for the disastrous general election result that followed.
Sensing that this legacy might harm his leadership prospects, Sir Keir has tried to shift the focus onto his pre-frontbench career. In a stirring campaign video released in early January, he set out his achievements: he defended striking dockers and environmental activists; gave free legal advice to poll tax protesters; represented Helen Steele and David Morris in the Mclibel trial; and helped convict the murderers of Stephen Lawrence. As Director of Public Prosecutions, he grappled with MPs over the expenses scandal, prosecuted the energy secretary for perverting the course of justice, and brought cases against Murdoch-hired phone hackers. ‘I’ve spent my life fighting for justice’, he says, ‘standing up for the powerless and against the powerful’.

Sir Keir’s record is impressive, even if this summary leaves out certain qualifying details (for example, Starmer may have been assigned some of his most noteworthy cases, rather than choosing to take them on; he was found by a select committee to have restricted the scope of the phone hacking investigation; and his estimated net worth of £1–5 million makes it somewhat less remarkable that he occasionally works pro bono). Still, there’s no doubt that the Labour leadership frontrunner – once voted ‘Britain’s fairest man’ – has done some admirable things, and that his statesmanlike persona is better at rebuffing media smears than Corbyn’s admixture of defensiveness and piety. Yet, a closer look at Sir Kier’s past casts some doubt on his self-presentation as a champion of the oppressed.

Starmer’s campaign video touts his respect for human rights and civil liberties, foregrounding his opposition to the Iraq war and the NSA presence at Menwith Hill. It cites his Guardian op-ed, published in 2003, which dismantles Blair’s use of resolution 1441 as a pretext for invading and suggests that the government’s official justification lacks ‘credibility’. Yet when the SNP proposed an investigation into Blair’s apparent lying in the run up to the war – bolstered by findings from the Chilcot report – Sir Keir voted against it. He also voted for Trident in 2016, and worked tirelessly to secure Labour’s support for the Investigatory Power Bill, which expanded state surveillance and authorised the bulk collection of digital communications. As DPP, Sir Keir tempered his love of liberty by fast-tracking the extradition of Julian Assange (a process now making its way through the courts). He flouted legal precedents by advising Swedish lawyers not to question Assange in Britain: a decision that prolonged the latter’s legal purgatory, denied closure to his accusers in Sweden, and sealed his fate before a US show trial. Leaked emails from August 2012 show that, when the Swedish legal team expressed hesitancy about keeping Assange’s case open, Sir Keir’s office replied: ‘Don’t you dare get cold feet’.

Sound judgement on resolution 1441, then; but a demonstrable conviction that people who expose war crimes should face prosecution, while people who perpetrate them should not. These aren’t the only groups that Sir Keir has been particularly keen to quash over the course of his career. As head of the Crown Prosecution Service, he altered legal guidelines so that those improperly claiming benefits could be charged under the Fraud Act, which carries a maximum sentence of ten years (Emily Thornberry argued it should be increased to fourteen). Sir Keir also removed the financial threshold for such cases, allowing the government to waste endless resources arresting and incarcerating people who had claimed minimal amounts of money. ‘It is vital that we take a tough stance on this type of fraud’, he said, ‘and I am determined to see a clampdown on those who flout the system’. Never mind that fraud was estimated to account for only 0.7% of the welfare budget; that the dizzyingly complex bureaucracy instated by the Tories increased the likelihood of accidentally over-claiming; and that no ‘tough stance’ was taken on the £12 billion lost annually to corporate tax avoidance. This hostility to scroungers evidently stayed in place until 2015, when Sir Keir decided to abstain on the Tory Welfare Bill: a series of drastic cuts to social spending that disproportionately affected women, children and the disabled.

Despite his beneficence towards poll tax protesters, the barrister has generally erred on the side of ‘law and order’, reserving a particular antipathy for left-wing activists. He drew up rules that gave police officers more power to arrest demonstrators, in an attempt to crack down on ‘significant disruption’ after the 2010 student protests. Officers were encouraged to arrest those ‘equipped with clothes or masks to prevent identification, items that could be considered body protection, or an item that can be used as a weapon’. Appended to these instructions was a warning: ‘criminals bent on disruption and disorder…will not get an easy ride’. As commentators noted at the time, the vagueness of these guidelines equipped police with the authority to jail anyone wearing a scarf (since it could be used to ‘prevent identification’) or carrying a placard (which has on various occasions been classified as ‘weapon’), while the ban on body protection criminalised attempts to defend oneself from police violence. Sir Keir’s stern treatment of protesters tallied with his response to the London riots, when he stressed the necessity of rapid sentencing, and made a personal appearance in court to praise the judges who were handing down harsh penalties. His predecessor as DPP meanwhile reflected that the punishments marked a ‘collective loss of proportion’, and an abnegation of ‘humanity or justice’.

As well as taking ‘tough stances’ in the courtroom, Sir Keir’s CPS advised undercover police officers on how to infiltrate left-wing campaign groups via a ‘domestic extremism’ specialist. When it was alleged that, as part of this operation, numerous undercover agents had broken the law, given false evidence in court, and formed sexual relationships with activists in order to spy on them, the CPS launched an investigation into covert policing that was widely considered to be a whitewash. It admitted no systemic failings on the part of the CPS, offered no apology to the victims, and declined to re-open cases in which undercover policework may have led to wrongful convictions. There was no redress for the countless miscarriages of justice caused by this ‘anti-extremism’ crusade – which focused primarily on environmentalists and animal rights advocates – nor did he bring charges against officers who had manipulated women into sex. This is a far cry from the feminist credentials talked up in his campaign video; though it would be unreasonable to expect more from a man who, in 2010, dismissed the concerns of Women Against Rape, a group that met with him to discuss the treatment of women who are pressured into withdrawing sexual assault allegations and then subsequently prosecuted for lying (as in the recent Cyprus trial). To his credit, Sir Keir pledged to personally review future indictments of this kind; but the campaigners’ requests – that he overturn the sentences of women jailed for retracting rape claims and place a moratorium on such convictions – were summarily thrown out.

Reluctance to re-open cases is one thing. But the decorated QC’s aversion to prosecuting law enforcers – and preference for legitimising their brutality – was most evident when he refused to indict the policemen who killed Jean Charles de Menendez, a Brazilian immigrant mistaken for terror suspect and gunned down in Stockwell tube station. Sir Keir issued the same verdict in the case of Ian Tomlinson, who was killed by police in an unprovoked attack during the G20 protests. Both charges were dropped due to ‘insufficient evidence’ – a judgement that may have been correct given the biases of the British judicial system (Tomlinson’s killer was eventually tried and acquitted, despite the DPP’s initial ruling), but one that jars with the undaunted ‘fight for justice’ to which Sir Keir is supposedly dedicated. Indeed, a comprehensive view of his record reveals more contradictions than his leadership pitch will acknowledge – broadly progressive and deeply establishment, concerned with social justice and suspicious of social movements, bane of corrupt politicians and of peaceful protesters. Competent? Perhaps. But ‘for the powerless and against the powerful’? No, Sir.

Oliver Eagleton is an editorial intern at New Left Review.

_________________
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'Suppression of truth, human spirit and the holy chord of justice never works long-term. Something the suppressors never get.' David Southwell
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TonyGosling
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 04, 2020 12:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Policies: where do Labour leadership candidates stand?
Keir Starmer would bring back EU freedom of movement
Lisa Nandy would scrap Local Enterprise Partnerships & hand more cash to councils
Rebecca Long-Bailey would renationalise rail, mail, energy & water https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/labour-leadership-candidates-st and-brexit-21497170

Defence

KEIR STARMER

Have a Prevention of Military Intervention Act to 'stop illegal wars'
Review' all UK arms sales. 2019 manifesto called for suspension
Voted against UK military action in Syria but for replacing Trident

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Would be prepared to use nuclear weapons, but 'isn't a warmonger'
Would keep Corbyn's pledge to suspend arms sales
Refused to back Burgon's 'peace pledge' letting members vote on war

LISA NANDY

Would be prepared to press the 'nuclear button'
Would back Trident renewal but only when tied to multilateral disarmament
Opposes Burgon's 'peace pledge' letting members vote on war
Supports military intervention in some instances but voted against Syria strikes

Democracy

KEIR STARMER

Would scrap the Lords and have an elected chamber of regions and nations
Pledges a 'federal UK' with overhaul of the constitution
Has signalled support for a more proportional voting system

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Would scrap the Lords and have a PR-elected Senate based outside London
Would not appoint any new peers
Wants to consult members on using PR for general and local elections
Wants more devolution to regions and nations

LISA NANDY

Backs House of Lords reform but not as first priority
Wants more Citizens' Assemblies e.g. on climate and Brexit way forward
Would scrap Local Enterprise Partnerships to hand more money to councils

Tax and benefits

KEIR STARMER

Would scrap Universal Credit and replace with 'system fit for the 21st Century'
Vows to introduce split payments by default under Universal Credit
Would hike Income Tax on top 5% - but stops short of repeating pledge exactly
Reverse Tory cuts to Corporation Tax and make health as important as GDP

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Would scrap Universal Credit which she brands 'beyond repair'
Points out her vote against Tory welfare cuts in 2015
Vows to end benefit sanctions and establish a new social security system
Would stick to Labour's specific 2019 pledges on tax hike for the richest 5%

LISA NANDY

Would scrap Universal Credit and overhaul the system, designed by claimants
Opposed the Tories' welfare cuts and was on maternity leave during a key vote
Bring Capital Gains Tax in line with Income Tax and raise Corporation Tax
Would focus more on taxing wealth than currently, not just earnings

Read More
Latest Labour leadership news

Burgon invites Blair to politics school
Nandy and Starmer clash
Where they stand on the key policies
Profiles of candidates for leader

Education

KEIR STARMER

Would keep Labour's pledge to scrap university tuition fees
Says he wants more money for early years education

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Would keep Labour's pledge to scrap university tuition fees
Sticks to Labour's pledge of free adult education & National Education Service

LISA NANDY

Commits to scrapping tuition fees as in Labour's manifesto
But first priority would be to bring back EMA for 16-18-year-olds
Has not committed to fulfil Labour members' policy to scrap private schools

Nationalisation

KEIR STARMER

Nationalisation of the railways - but other services could go public through co-operatives etc, not top-down nationalisation
Backs 'common ownership' of mail, energy and water

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Pledges 'modern democratic public ownership' including of the railways
Saus this would mean full nationalisation of rail, mail, energy and water
Presided over nationalised free broadband policy

LISA NANDY

Backs nationalisation of railways and Royal Mail
But would opt for community ownership of energy/water not full nationalisation
Spoke out against manifesto policy to nationalise broadband
Says councils should be able to run bus companies

Workers

KEIR STARMER

Repeal the Tories' 'malicious' Trade Union Act which limited right to strike
Says the bond between Labour and unions 'cannot be weakened'

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Would bring in a legal right to switch off your phone outside work
Pledges to back all strikes 'no questions asked'
Would repeal the Tories' Trade Union Act
Would repeal all anti-trade union laws going back to Thatcher era

LISA NANDY

Would repeal the Tories' Trade Union Act
Backs the manifesto pledge on giving all workers over 16 the same min wage

Environment

KEIR STARMER

Back Labour's Green New Deal at the heart of 'everything we do'
Wouldn't achieve everything in four years - but work with councils to start

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Helped write Labour's Green New Deal with thousands of low-carbon jobs
Backs manifesto pledge of getting towards net zero emissions by 2030

LISA NANDY

Backs Green New Deal but wants focus on home insultation, jobs, transport
Would put taxes on polluters and back community energy projects
Wouldn't sign a trade deal with any nation not part of Paris agreement - e.g. US

Equalities

KEIR STARMER

Says 'trans rights are human rights' and Gender Recognition Act needs reform
Backs all-women shortlists and would change law to have all-BAME shortlists
Has not signed the LCTR pledge card signed by the other two

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Backed 12 LCTR pledges on trans rights to expel 'transphobic' members
Backs all-women shortlists and all-BAME shortlists

LISA NANDY

Backed 12 LCTR pledges on trans rights to expel 'transphobic' members
Backs all-women shortlists

Royal Family

KEIR STARMER

Would 'downsize ' the Royal family but not back scrapping it
Says the issue didn't come up on the doorstep in the election

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Wouldn't scrap monarchy, saying we've 'more important things to worry about'

LISA NANDY

"I'm a democrat so I would vote to scrap it" if there was a referendum
But says it's not a priority for the country

Jeremy Corbyn

KEIR STARMER

Refuses to say whether he'd have Jeremy Corbyn in his shadow cabinet

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Said she'd 'like to' offer Mr Corbyn a place in her top team

Housing

KEIR STARMER

Promises indefinite tenancies and rent controls
Insist on new builds being zero-carbon to help the climate crisis
Says there must be a 'new generation of council and social homes'
But stopped short of backing Labour Campaign for Council Housing pledge

REBECCA LONG-BAILEY

Backs Labour Campaign for Council Housing vow - 100k council homes a year
Would also end right to buy and commit £75bn infrastructure fund over 5 years

LISA NANDY

Backs Labour Campaign for Council Housing vow - 100k council homes a year

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