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Anti-war Royal British Legion, sponsored by top arms firms

 
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 6:47 pm    Post subject: Anti-war Royal British Legion, sponsored by top arms firms Reply with quote

The arms trade must be kept out of Remembrance Day
http://www.redpepper.org.uk/the-arms-trade-must-be-kept-out-of-remembr ance-day/

See also
http://vfpuk.org/2015/my-name-is-legion/

Andrew Smith and Matthew Burnett-Stuart from Campaign Against Arms Trade look at the role of arms companies in World War One and how they are trying to exploit Remembrance Day.
5 November 2014

thales-poppy-poster-2014
There are few industries with as much to be ashamed of as the arms trade. It is a trade that for generations has profiteered from grotesque human rights abuses and deadly wars and conflicts. Every year its weapons facilitate the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people, as it hands over extortionate profits and dividends to rich businessmen that appear to care little for the damage done by their wars.

As the nation marks Remembrance Day you might expect that if there is one industry that should be keeping a low profile it's the arms trade.

Unfortunately not. Despite its history of war profiteering it has only been too happy to exploit the legacy of those who have died in conflicts and to brazenly associate itself with the annual memorials.

One arms company that has a long and inglorious history of arming some of the world's most brutal dictatorships, Thales, has taken the opportunity to brand the entrance of Westminster underground station with a poppy covered billboard.

Lockheed Martin, the world's biggest arms company, is the main sponsor of the British Legion Young Professionals' Poppy Rocks event. Unfortunately this is far from the first time that the Legion has taken money from the arms trade. The UK's biggest arms company, BAE Systems, has been a long-standing 'supporter'. In the past it has sponsored national poppy appeals and donated to fund-raising drives. It's influence is still there, but now it keep a lower profile. This year they will be sponsoring the annual Poppy Ball white tie dinner, and specific offices and arms factories will be hosting their own local events.

The Legion has been co-opted for the interests of the arms trade before. In 2012 a newspaper investigation forced the then president of the Legion, Lieutenant General Sir John Kiszely, to resign over allegations that former commanders were using their connections to lobby on behalf of arms companies. Kiszely himself told an undercover reporter, who was pretending to work for a South Korean arms company, that the annual Remembrance Day ceremony was a 'tremendous networking opportunity' before boasting of the access it gave him to powerful people.

Arms companies and World War One

All of these companies would rather we ignored the role their industry has played in enabling war, both during World War One and in subsequent conflicts.

The Arming All Sides project exposes the hidden history of World War One. It tells of how a global network of arms companies fuelled war by selling a new generation of advanced weapons to anyone who would pay for them.

It was this drive for profits at all costs that led British arms companies, Armstrong and Vickers - which later merged to become BAE - to sell weapons to the Ottoman Empire that would soon be turned on British soldiers.

Moreover, as international tensions created new business opportunities, some arms companies purposely created war scares in order to increase the arms race. For example, Herbert Mulliner, director of Coventry Ordnance Works, persuaded the British government in 1909, with the support of the Daily Mail, that Germany was secretly accelerating its naval programme. The scare stimulated massive naval expenditure and created an atmosphere of mutual suspicion, making war more likely. Even Winston Churchill later accepted that the claims were entirely false.

World War One was shaped by weapons. It was the first global conflict since the industrial revolution, and the new generation of mechanised arms led to devastating casualties. Attempts had been made to ban Chemical Warfare as early as 1899, but the arms trade persevered, and gas killed 25,000 on the Western front alone.

It's for this reason that the tragedies of the time should never be forgotten, let alone airbrushed over by an arms trade that is trying to give the impression of legitimacy.

The arms trade and public spaces

It is not just Remembrance Day that arms companies seek to exploit, it's also other major civic events. Only last month Guildford Borough Council took the unusual step of suspending its own ethical sponsorship policy in order to allow it to take money from arms companies for Armed Forced Day in 2015. Likewise, this year drone company Selex ES was among the main sponsors of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

Arms companies have also been more than happy to associate themselves with some of the country's best known museums and attractions. The last few years alone have seen the Science Museum, London Transport Museum, National Gallery and Edinburgh Science Festival among those that have taken money from the arms trade.

Arms companies do not do this because they care about the war dead, or because they want to promote art and culture. They do it because it is good for their business. By agreeing to take money from arms companies these organisations are giving practical support and a veneer of credibility to an industry that profits from the same war and repression that they seek to commemorate.

Andrew and Matt are spokespeople for Campaign Against Arms Trade. You can follow CAAT on Twitter at @wwwcaatorguk





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9 COMMENTS


Ben Griffin 6 November 2014, 10.50

The Royal British Legion exists to control remembrance, it is in fact a huge propaganda machine. Without the arms trade money the RBL would still wage an annual campaign that has got little to do with remembrance and everything to do with encouraging the public to support the military and war without question.


Kristin 7 November 2014, 10.13

A great article, and great facts to explain our rage and sadness about arms companies that give to commemorate with one hand while taking money for more of the same war-killing with the other.

Thank you!


David Leach 7 November 2014, 11.48

To think that my great grandfather my Grandfather ( Who lost his left arm in action ) his brothers also my father and his eight brother and one sister all joined the armed forces they all fought in many campaigns across the world at great risk to life and limb . They were all conned and lied to being told they were fighting the WAR TO END ALL WARS ! Creating a better safer and more abundant future was said to be theirs in the future ?That Not being so in my fathers case after being demobbed in 1948 after being recalled in 1938 having previously done his national service as a single young man then being married in the early 1930s being a father to four young children before the outbreak of WWII then two more children during the war and three more boys 1945 -1948-1952 . To find out he had contracted Cancer from dust and chemicals used in these periods of armed forces service to his king and country ? With no know restitution or help from the HOVERMENTALITY of the armed services or government ! They that served for LIES and DECIET of these SELFISH GREEDY SELF SERVING WAR MONGERING PSYCHOPATHS IN POWER !


Hugh Donnelly 9 November 2014, 10.50

I have reading a lot recently about the influence of big business in politics. Not surprising they also use charities to meet their objectives. Charities need to be completely transparent otherwise genuine people will mistrust them and stop giving. Money truly is the root of all evil.


Pat Tamler 10 November 2014, 12.11

Why is the creator of the gun to be blamed for what his customers use it for? And what about all the major research contributions in technology in our everyday lives the research departments of these organisations bring? It is not even mentioned here. Part of this ‘arms trade’ money goes on research that in the past it has been seen to be from The Internet itself, to GPS, to sophisticated technology in our mobile phones. What about our everyday benefits in civilian world that these companies eventually bring? What about the financial help they provide to the country? Wasn’t this worth mentioning in this article?


Ian Saville 11 November 2014, 10.48

Pat, it is absurd to think that the only way one can carry out research into socially useful technology is as a by-product of an industry devoted to finding more and more efficient ways of killing. How about making the socially useful stuff the focus of research, and leaving the arms companies to pick up whatever harmful by-products come from that?


Jeff 12 November 2014, 15.59

Royal British Legion should disassociate itself forthwith from any Company involved in the arms trade.


Owen 21 November 2014, 16.28

The Remembrance Sunday/Help for Heroes movement has nothing do to with preventing war and everything to do with celebrating it

Ironically the current fetishisation of “Our boys” may well make it more difficult for governments to wage war and send them to kill or be killed.


kokociel 5 December 2014, 10.29

Ian, technologies such as GPS are not going to receive investment for the promise that we can send up all these expensive satellites so that people can navigate to the shops a bit more easily. There often needs to be one excellent, well-funded use case to get such projects off the ground: regular people could only ever receive such technology as a spin-off

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 06, 2016 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robert Fisk: Do those who flaunt the poppy on their lapels know that they mock the war dead?
http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/commentators/fisk/robert-fisk-do-t hose-who-flaunt-the-poppy-on-their-lapels-know-that-they-mock-the-war- dead-6257416.html

Robert Fisk @indyvoices Saturday 5 November 2011
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I turned on the television in my Damascus hotel room to witness a dreary sight: all the boys and girls of BBC World wearing their little poppies again.

Bright red they were, with that particularly silly green leaf out of the top – it was never part of the original Lady Haig appeal – and not one dared to appear on screen without it. Do these pathetic men and women know how they mock the dead? I trust that Jon Snow has maintained his dignity by not wearing it.

Now I've mentioned my Dad too many times in The Independent. He died almost 20 years ago so, after today, I think it's time he was allowed to rest in peace, and that readers should in future be spared his sometimes bald wisdom. This is the last time he will make an appearance. But he had strong views about wearing the poppy. He was a soldier of the Great War, Battle of Arras 1918 – often called the Third Battle of the Somme – and the liberation of Cambrai, along with many troops from Canada. The Kaiser Wilhelm's army had charitably set the whole place on fire and he was appalled by the scorched earth policy of the retreating Germans. But of course, year after year, he would go along to the local cenotaph in Birkenhead, and later in Maidstone, where I was born 28 years after the end of his Great War, and he always wore his huge black coat, his regimental tie – 12th Battalion, the King's Liverpool Regiment – and his poppy.

In those days, it was – I recall this accurately, I think – a darker red, blood-red rather than BBC-red, larger than the sorrow-lite version I see on the BBC and without that ridiculous leaf. So my Dad would stand and I would be next to him in my Yardley Court School blazer at 10 years old and later, aged 16, in my Sutton Valence School blazer, with my very own Lady Haig poppy, its long black wire snaking through the material, sprouting from my lapel.

My Dad gave me lots of books about the Great War, so I knew about the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand at Sarajevo before I went to school – and 47 years before I stood, amid real shellfire, in the real Sarajevo and put my feet on the very pavement footprints where Gavrilo Princip fired the fatal shots.

But as the years passed, old Bill Fisk became very ruminative about the Great War. He learned that Haig had lied, that he himself had fought for a world that betrayed him, that 20,000 British dead on the first day of the Somme – which he mercifully avoided because his first regiment, the Cheshires, sent him to Dublin and Cork to deal with another 1916 "problem" – was a trashing of human life. In hospital and recovering from cancer, I asked him once why the Great War was fought. "All I can tell you, fellah," he said, "was that it was a great waste." And he swept his hand from left to right. Then he stopped wearing his poppy. I asked him why, and he said that he didn't want to see "so many damn fools" wearing it – he was a provocative man and, sadly, I fell out with him in his old age. What he meant was that all kinds of people who had no idea of the suffering of the Great War – or the Second, for that matter – were now ostentatiously wearing a poppy for social or work-related reasons, to look patriotic and British when it suited them, to keep in with their friends and betters and employers. These people, he said to me once, had no idea what the trenches of France were like, what it felt like to have your friends die beside you and then to confront their brothers and wives and lovers and parents. At home, I still have a box of photographs of his mates, all of them killed in 1918.

So like my Dad, I stopped wearing the poppy on the week before Remembrance Day, 11 November, when on the 11th hour of the 11 month of 1918, the armistice ended the war called Great. I didn't feel I deserved to wear it and I didn't think it represented my thoughts. The original idea came, of course, from the Toronto military surgeon and poet John McCrae and was inspired by the death of his friend Lieutenant Alexis Helmer, killed on 3 May 1915. "In Flanders fields the poppies blow/Between the crosses, row on row." But it's a propaganda poem, urging readers to "take up the quarrel with the foe". Bill Fisk eventually understood this and turned against it. He was right.I've had my share of wars, and often return to the ancient Western Front. Three years ago, I was honoured to be invited to give the annual Armistice Day Western Front memorial speech at the rebuilt Cloth Hall in Ypres. The ghost of my long-dead 2nd Lieutenant Dad was, of course, in the audience. I quoted all my favourite Great War writers, along with the last words of Nurse Edith Cavell, and received, shortly afterwards, a wonderful and eloquent letter from the daughter of that fine Great War soldier Edmund Blunden. (Read his Undertones of War, if you do nothing else in life.) But I didn't wear a poppy. And I declined to lay a wreath at the Menin Gate. This was something of which I was not worthy. Instead, while they played the last post, I looked at the gravestones on the city walls.

As a young boy, I also went to Ypres with my Dad, stayed at the "Old Tom Hotel" (it is still there, on the same side of the square as the Cloth Hall) and met many other "old soldiers", all now dead. I remember that they wanted to remember their dead comrades. But above all, they wanted an end to war. But now I see these pathetic creatures with their little sand-pit poppies – I notice that our masters in the House of Commons do the same – and I despise them. Heaven be thanked that the soldiers of the Great War cannot return today to discover how their sacrifice has been turned into a fashion appendage.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2016 1:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hedge fund investor 'doubles money' on Tower poppies
Just a third of the money raised by last year's Tower of London display went to charity.
Jennifer Offord By Jen Offord November 6, 2016 11:51 GMT
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/hedge-fund-investor-doubles-money-tower-poppi es-1590115

The Tower of London's Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red Armistice display, which was on display last year, made a significant profit for hedge fund investor who helped finance the project, it was revealed on Sunday.

Ben Whitfield, a former executive of Olympia Capital Management, made between £2m-£3m ($2.5m-$3.76m) while artist Paul Cummins took home almost £7.2m, which would likely have made him a profit The Sunday Times estimated.

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After other costs – such as £1.36m for the Tower's management organisation and 5% VAT to HM Revenue and Customs were deducted – just £8.4m of the total £23m raised from the display was paid to charity. It had been claimed that more than £15m was raised for service charities.

Cummins, who's ceramics company which created the poppies sold to members of the public for £25, told the Sunday Times, "It would not have been possible to create the artwork," without private investment.

A spokesperson added that Whitfield was paid "in line with what would have been expected from any high-risk, large-scale project".

The 888,246 ceramic poppies – one for each of the First World War fallen British and Commonwealth servicemen – which filled the Tower's moat last year would have cost around £2.50 to manufacture. Sources told The Sunday Times that the £7.2m paid to Cummins' company was significantly higher than costs incurred by the artist.

The revelation will do little to instil public confidence in charity donations, as Just Giving netted a 5% fee for each donation. In September, the Sunday Times also cast doubt over the use of Libor fine funds given by the UK government to veterans' charities.

tower of london poppies
Members of the public paid £25 to 'plant' a ceramic poppy at the Tower of London in remembrance of fallen servicemenJohn Stillwell/AFP
The UK government announced this year that funds from fines levied on banks for Libor rate-rigging would go to charities. At the time, then-chancellor George Osborne said: "I am proud to be supporting causes that will make a real difference to those dedicated to serving their country. It is right that funding from those in the banking industry who demonstrated the worst of values goes towards people who display the very best of British values."

Concerns raised by the Times in September ranged from criticisms of techniques used by one of the beneficiaries to questioning the existence of another. The Times said The Warrior Programme, which received almost £1m, used "dangerous" treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder, practised by a trainer who had no formal qualifications.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2017 11:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Red poppies and the arms trade
PAUL ROGERS 12 November 2014
A vast blood-red memorial in London evokes war's victims. Behind it stand the weapon-makers that could create millions more.
https://www.opendemocracy.net/paul-rogers/red-poppies-and-arms-trade

The huge field of ceramic poppies around the moat of the Tower of London has had a profound impact over the past few weeks, representing more than 888,000 people from Britain and its then empire killed in the 1914-18 war. It has taken the red poppy symbol to a much greater prominence, but the very use of this symbol and its link with remembrance has changed over the years.

Until around 2000, the annual experience of remembrance in Britain in early November had marked military overtones, even if it was essentially still being about remembering the military dead. For the best part of a decade the emphasis then seemed to move subtly away from the military dimension and more towards an anti-war sentiment. Perhaps this was the impact of the few very elderly survivors of the war still living, most notably the remarkable Harry Patch, and their evident attitude of regret and even detestation of war. It may also have been affected by the concern across so much of the population at the loss of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and Iraq.

What was unusual but in many ways understandable was that the anti-war element in national culture was directed at the wars and the politicians who ordered them and not at the military. If anything, the popularity of the army actually increased. People were able systematically to draw a distinction between unpopular wars and the people who fought them - some dying and many more maimed for life.

This attitude lay behind a surprisingly wide satisfaction at the coalition government’s failure to gain a parliamentary vote in support of military action against Syria in late August 2013, and it represented a change of mood which was a clear worry for the government. Part of this has been met by a greater emphasis on the soldiers, with parades through towns and cities becoming more common than in recent decades, and it may also lie behind the ministry of defence’s substantial budget for military education in schools.

The gun and the flower

Where the tension comes to the fore, if not currently with great publicity, is one aspect of the annual "poppy appeal" - the ready gaining of sponsorship from some of the world’s largest arms companies. There are a number of examples, including the very striking Red Poppy hoarding at Westminster underground station which is sponsored by Thales, a singularly large French arms company with a substantial branch in the UK. Another is probably the biggest single celebration of the autumn, the Poppy Ball on 30 October 2014, sponsored by BAe Systems, the world’s third largest arms company, behind Boeing and the leader, Lockheed Martin.

Which brings us to Lockheed Martin itself, a primarily United States company with a turnover of $36 billion in 2013. Its British offshoot is Lockheed Martin UK, which sponsors another prestigious event: the Poppy Rocks Ball, held this year at the Honorary Artillery Company in London on 25 October and aimed, if that is the word, at young professionals as part of a process of raising awareness among a younger generation.

So where does Lockheed Martin actually come from and how does it link with the UK defence posture? Its origins lie with the 1994 merger of the Lockheed Corporation with Martin Marietta, the latter being one of the main US arms companies in the 1960s and 1970s with a particular speciality in developing and producing long-range nuclear missiles. These included the Titan 2 intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) the most powerful nuclear missile ever deployed by the United States with a single 9 megaton warhead, over 700 times the explosive force of the Hiroshima bomb.

In the latter part of the cold war, both sides went for multiple smaller warheads on each missile. When Martin Marietta merged with the Lockheed Corporation in 1995, much of the expertise went into Lockheed’s work in producing submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM). The most recent of these is the Trident D5 SLBM deployed by the US navy and the Royal Navy; the latter has four Vanguard-class missile submarines, each capable of carrying and firing sixteen missiles, these constituting Britain’s nuclear force.

For many years now, intercontinental nuclear missiles have typically had multiple warheads, each of which can be aimed at a different target. One of Lockheed’s Trident D5 missiles can theoretically carry twelve warheads in what in the jargon is termed a multiple independently-targetable re-entry vehicle (MIRV); since each boat can carry sixteen missiles, that gives a theoretical total of 192 warheads. In practice, it is believed that the UK system normally operates with eight missiles and a maximum of forty warheads, and some sources suggest just three warheads per missile.

Taking this minimum figure, since each warhead is believed to have a 100 kiloton force (i.e. equivalent to 100,000-tons of conventional high explosive), this means that one missile can target three cities with warheads eight times as powerful as the Hiroshima bomb that killed 100,000 people.

Thus a single missile can easily kill far more than the 888,000 men and women represented by the red poppies encircling the Tower of London. Some may see an irony in Lockheed Martin UK sponsoring the Poppy Rocks Ball, but perhaps the real irony is that neither Lockheed Martin UK nor the Royal British Legion sees the irony of it.



About the author
Paul Rogers is professor in the department of peace studies at Bradford University, northern England. He is openDemocracy's international security adviser, and has been writing a weekly column on global security since 28 September 2001; he also writes a monthly briefing for the Oxford Research Group. His latest book is Irregular War: ISIS and the New Threat from the Margins (IB Tauris, 2016), which follows Why We’re Losing the War on Terror (Polity, 2007), and Losing Control: Global Security in the 21st Century (Pluto Press, 3rd edition, 2010). He is on Twitter at: @ProfPRogers

A lecture by Paul Rogers, delivered to the Food Systems Academy in late 2014, provides an overview of the analysis that underpins his openDemocracy column. The lecture - "The crucial century, 1945-2045: transforming food systems in a global context" - focuses on the central place of food systems in human security worldwide. Paul argues that food is the pivot of humanity's next great transition. It can be accessed here

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 12, 2017 10:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The poppy has become a symbol of racism – I will never wear one again
The Entente Cordiale which sent my father to France is now trash beneath the high heels of Theresa May, yet this wretched woman dares to wear a poppy

Robert Fisk @indyvoices Thursday 3 November 2016 09:30 GMT
http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/poppy-symbol-of-racism-never-worn- one-never-will-robert-fisk-remembrance-day-first-world-war-second-a739 4976.html

The Every Man Remembered sculpture in London, commemorating First World War soldiers Rex
Yes, the boys and girls of the BBC and ITV, and all our lively media and sports personalities and politicians, are at it again. They’re flaunting their silly poppies once more to show their super-correctness in the face of history, as ignorant or forgetful as ever that their tired fashion accessory was inspired by a poem which urged the soldiers of the Great War of 1914-18 to go on killing and slaughtering.

But that’s no longer quite the point, for I fear there are now darker reasons why these TV chumps and their MP interviewees sport their red compassion badges on their clothes.

For who are they commemorating? The dead of Sarajevo? Of Srebrenica? Of Aleppo? Nope. The television bumpkins only shed their crocodile tears for the dead of First and Second World Wars, who were (save for a colonial war or two) the last generation of Britons to get the chop before the new age of “we-bomb-you-die” technology ensured that their chaps – brown-eyed, for the most part, often Muslims, usually dark skinned – got blown to bits while our chaps flew safely home to the mess for breakfast.

Yes, I rage against the poppy disgrace every year. And yes, my father – 12th Battalion The King’s Liverpool Regiment, Third Battle of the Somme, the liberation of burning Cambrai 1918 – finally abandoned the poppy charade when he learned of the hypocrisy and lies behind the war in which he fought. His schoolboy son followed his father’s example and never wore his wretched Flanders flower again.

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0:54

Sky News presenter questions Breitbart editor over poppy
Oddly, the dunderheads who are taking Britain out of the European Union on a carpet of equally deceitful lies – and I include Theresa May and her buffoonery of ministers – are guilty of even greater hypocrisy than the TV presenters whose poppies, for just a few days a year, take over the function of studio make-up artists (poppies distracting viewers from the slabs of paste on their TV faces). For the fields of Flanders, the real mud and faeces and blood which those vile poppies are supposed to symbolise, showed just how European our dead generations were.

British soldiers went off to fight and die in their tens of thousands for little Catholic Belgium, today the seat of the EU where Nigel Farage disgraced his country by telling the grandchildren of those we went to fight for that they’d never done a day’s work in their lives. In France, British (and, of course, Irish) soldiers bled to death in even greater Golgothas – 20,000 alone on the first day of the Somme in 1916 – to save the nation which we are now throwing out of our shiny new insular lives.

The Entente Cordiale which sent my father to France is now trash beneath the high heels of Theresa May – yet this wretched woman dares to wear a poppy.


READ MORE
In the carnage of Aleppo children die on both sides of the city
When Poles fought and died alongside British pilots in the 1940 Battle of Britain to save us from Nazi Germany, we idolised them, lionised them, wrote about their exploits in the RAF, filmed them, fell in love with them. For them, too, we pretend to wear the poppy. But now the poppy wearers want to throw the children of those brave men out of Britain. Shame is the only word I can find to describe our betrayal.

And perhaps I sniff something equally pernicious among the studio boys and girls. On Britain’s international television channels, Christmas was long ago banned (save for news stories on the Pope). There are no Christmas trees any more beside the presenters’ desks, not a sprig of holly. For we live in a multicultural society, in which such manifestations might be offensive to other “cultures” (I use that word advisedly, for culture to me means Beethoven and the poet Hafiz and Monet).

In pictures: 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' poppy installation in London
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And for the same reason, our international screens never show the slightest clue of Eid festivities (save again for news stories) lest this, too, offends another “culture”. Yet the poppy just manages to sneak onto the screen of BBC World; it is permissable, you see, the very last symbol that “our” dead remain more precious than the millions of human beings we have killed, in the Middle East for example, for whom we wear no token of remembrance. Lord Blair of Kut al-Amara will be wearing his poppy this week – but not for those he liquidated in his grotesque invasion of Iraq.

And in this sense, I fear that the wearing of the poppy has become a symbol of racism. In his old-fashioned way (and he read a lot about post-imperial history) I think my father, who was 93 when he died, understood this.

His example was one of great courage. He fought for his country and then, unafraid, he threw his poppy away. Television celebrities do not have to fight for their country – yet they do not even have the guts to break this fake conformity and toss their sordid poppies in the office wastepaper bin.

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